null

Musings

        
{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"16th Sep 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: BELLA THOMAS\r\n\r\n\tIn the second of our \r\n\tMy Secret Australia series, model-artist-photographer Bella Thomas talks effortless beauty and secret hiking trails.\r\n\r\n\r\nAsk Bella Thomas what she does for a living and her answer will likely change depending on the day. “I would describe myself as some kind of artist,” she says. “Some weeks I’m modelling full time, some days I find myself taking photos, creating with clay or have my head deep in photoshop. I don’t like to box myself in, makes me anxious,” she laughs.\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\nBorn and raised by the Sydney shoreline, Thomas grew up with sandy feet and hot salted chips at sunset. “The beauty in simplicity is what I cherish and find most special.” This sense of simplicity in her surrounding environments imbues much of her creative output. “I don’t like to over complicate anything. When I have a project to do I come up with ideas and then keep peeling it back, aiming to always show beauty in the most effortless way,” she reflects. “True beauty is effortless, just like the Australian landscape.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t “Our world, in particular Australia, is so magnificent.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t  “True beauty is\r\n\t effortless”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nThomas’s perception of success, and the industry, reflects her laid-back, intuitive spirit. “Being part of the fashion industry, and coming from how I was raised, I am realising more and more [how] much I need ‘simple’.”\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\nWhen in search of creative inspiration, she turns her gaze to the NSW coastline (“The south coast of NSW has me in awe every time I take the drive down. I love the people and the landscape”), but it’s the WA shoreline that holds a special place in her heart.\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“A few years ago I went to Perth for a job. We drove eight hours from the airport to Esperance, and then another three hours by boat to this natural pink lake on an island. It was so surreal.”\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tThough she holds her secret hideaways close to her chest, she is happy to share her new favourite hiking trail. “One new hiking spot I’ve recently come across is a gem, it’s up in the Bouddi National Park. I think you start at Putty Beach … it’s pretty!” As for where Thomas dreams of exploring next? “I’d love to explore Tasmania more, have heard there is so much beauty to see!”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        In the second of our My Secret Australia series, model-artist-photographer Bella Thomas talks effortless beauty and secret hiking trails.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [497, 295, 217, 743]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Secret Australia: BELLA THOMAS","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/parallax-1-image-3.jpg?t=1600243864"},"title":"Secret Australia: BELLA THOMAS","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/secret-australia-bella-thomas/"}
Secret Australia: BELLA THOMAS

Secret Australia: BELLA THOMAS

read more
        
{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"9th Sep 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: SIR\r\n\r\n\tIn the first of Showroom-X’s \r\n\tMy Secret Australia series, we talk inspiring landscapes with SIR co-founders, Nikki Campbell and Sophie Coote.\r\n\r\n\r\nFor resortwear label SIR’s co-founders, Nikki Campbell and Sophie Coote, the ocean has always held special significance. Campbell, born and raised in Newcastle, credits her coastal childhood for shaping much of who she is today.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            “As a family we grew up on the   \r\n\tbeach\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nsome of my\r\n\t fondest memories were made there.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nAcross the country, Coote spent her formative years amidst the untouched beauty of Perth, Western Australia.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Growing up there was a beautiful experience. My childhood was spent exploring the coastlines of Rottnest Island and the southern coastal regions of Margaret River and Yallingup,” she recalls. “Perth has influenced my relaxed approach toward dressing and minimal femme aesthetic.”\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIt comes as no surprise, then, that the brand finds some of its greatest inspiration in Australian seascapes. “SIR was born along the coast – we have always drawn inspiration from our hometowns and coastal upbringing. It is that … culture, and desire to travel, which shaped the conception of the brand and continues to inspire our designs and collections.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tLaunched in 2014, SIR’s signature aesthetic is quintessentially Australian – separates, intimates and ready-to-wear pieces cut in versatile fabrications, designed to pair back effortlessly with any capsule wardrobe. The collections are feminine, easy-wearing with subtle touches of whimsy, making them favourites of the beach-to-BBQ-to-event lifestyle that Australians have so lovingly cultivated.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“The Australian landscape has an incredible contrast of harsh and soft lines – this inspires a lot of our collections with natural fibres, soft embroidery and feminine florals contrasted with tailored suiting and utilitarian pieces.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tFor the brand’s recent collection, Preface ’20, Campbell and Coote looked again to the ocean – specifically, the NSW South Coast town of Kiama. “It holds this untouched beauty,” the pair describe of the location. “The rugged cliff faces contrasted with soft with green fields are unlike any other coastal landscape we had shot against before. It showcases our incredible Australian coastline in a new lens.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhen it comes to other sources of inspiration, Campbell and Coote cite Uluru as place of special significance. “We have travelled there a few times now and it’s even more amazing each time we visit,” they describe. “The energy is other-worldly; the colours of the landscapes and skies are like no other. It is such a special place and we’re so honoured to have spent such so much time there.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAs for where they’ve got their sights set next? “Lord Howe Island – we’ve never been and it looks so beautiful and serene. We have shifted our travel focused this year to discovering new destinations within our reach. There is so many incredible destinations right in our own backyard.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        In the first of Showroom-X’s My Secret Australia series, we talk inspiring landscapes with SIR co-founders, Nikki Campbell and Sophie Coote.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [821, 819, 822, 497]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Secret Australia: SIR","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/sir-parallax-1-image-1.jpg?t=1599640761"},"title":"Secret Australia: SIR","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/secret-australia-sir/"}
Secret Australia: SIR

Secret Australia: SIR

read more
        
{"author":"Katarina Kroslakova ","date_published":"24th Aug 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Tactile Love\r\n\r\n\tThere’s no sensation quite like being cocooned in a hand-knitted merino jumper - especially one crafted by Wolfgang Scout.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“That’s the whole premise of our brand - we want you to feel special and like you’re wearing a luxury product, but one that’s super easy to wear and throw on.”\r\n\r\n\r\nVery rarely do fashion lovers get to place an order online and see their chosen piece come to life right in front of their eyes. But that is the unique approach of luxury knitwear label Wolfgang Scout. Co-founder Carla Woidt says this direct, honest connection with the buyer is perfectly suited to a material such as wool, with its inherent elements of nostalgia.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            “There’s something   \r\n\temotional  that attaches you to a product such as wool says Woidt.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nWe knit on \r\n\tdemand.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\"With each new personal order, as the garment is being knitted or hand-dyed, we send the customer pictures of it every step of the way. That’s really important. It also emphasises the artisanal nature of knitting and that this form of limited-quantity luxury is worth waiting for.\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“It helps people to understand that this is not a disposable product,” explains Woidt. “We do have a cap on the total number of jumpers we can sell each season. We’re not afraid of that. We can’t just grab some new wool and do it up: we have to work with the grower, the shearer, the knitter. It makes it more authentic. It’s the reality of what we can produce, from our raw material.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\tSpeaking of the raw material, Wolfgang Scout exclusively uses superfine Australian merino wool sourced from the Kia Ora Merino sheep farm in Victoria. Co-founded with fashion mavericks (and keen knitters) Marianne Horton and Natalie Wood, the one-year-old label is a passion project for the trio – in fact Woidt’s father was a sheep shearer.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIn order to achieve the super-soft, wearable finish, they not only specify the grower separates the raw wool at shearing stage according to their length specifications, but they have also developed a revolutionary new spin method to ensure the yarn makes each jumper ultimately durable but also luxurious. The knits are also hand-dyed in Australia using natural, organic materials.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“That’s the whole premise of our brand, we want you to feel special and like you’re wearing a luxury product, but one that’s super easy to wear and throw on,” says Woidt.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIf you haven’t already guessed, Woidt is passionate about promoting the beauty and softness of Australia’s most sustainable fibre. “I think Australian merino is one of the best fibres you can ever use,” she says. “So much or it goes to Italy for fine suiting. Instead of exporting, we should keep it here and create product that celebrates what Australian merino is.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle:  Tactile love\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        There’s no sensation quite like being cocooned in a hand-knitted merino jumper - especially one crafted by Wolfgang Scout.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Katarina Kroslakova\r\n    image: /product_images/import/KK-Head-Shot.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [775, 656, 776, 221]","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Tactile Love","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/wolfgang-scout-010.jpg?t=1591778590"},"title":"Tactile Love","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tactile-love/"}
Tactile Love

Tactile Love

read more
        
{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"22nd Aug 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Art ofthe land\r\n\r\n\tYour first glimpse inside Saint Cloche’s collaborative group show, \r\n\tTerra Australis Incognito, presented by the Art Annex of Showroom-X.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tThere is a place in Australia where the water is pure pink – a hue is so vivid you’d think someone manually altered life’s contrast setting. But it is real; as real as the sand between your toes or the salt sprayed on your arms. You can see it for yourself in Western Australia’s coastal town of Esperance. There are scientific explanations for the natural phenomenon, of course, but something about its presence feels wholly other-worldly, illusory, unreal. It’s a feeling that pervades across all aspects of our vast landscape, and one that artists have longed to capture for years.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            In partnership with the Art Annex of \r\n\tShowroom-X,  \r\n\tSaint Cloche gallery presents\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tTerra Australis Incognito\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t(This Great Unknown Land) – a collaborative group show concept celebrating the mystery and enchantment of our country’s almost-mythical terrain. “As a curator, I am very much drawn to exploring our awe-inspiring and vast Australian terrain and our rich, diverse culture,” explains Saint Cloche’s gallery director, Kitty Clark.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tBringing together some of Australia’s most talented emerging artists, the digital exhibition features works of varying mediums inspired by the landscape. Here, Showroom-X sends postcards from the digital showroom.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tEvi O\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWith a curious eye and mind, Evi O’s art practice was born from a simple desire to express her creativity and stories without boundaries or limitations.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n Through paint, she continues to explore the use of dominant abstract shapes, although the compositions she presents are broadly suggestive of earthly forms – animal, plant or constructed.\r\n\t“Vivid inspirations come from times spent exploring the Australian landscape. The sky that is often clear blue, pink, peach or sometimes grey. The land that is green and red at once, and the beautiful living creatures, be they animals or plants, manoeuvring trees and rocks.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tJustin Scivetti\r\nFloating somewhere between the real and unreal, Melbourne-based Justin Scivetti’s landscape paintings imbue a kind of fantasy, inspired by the natural and built environment, exploring subtleties in colour and light to bring the works to life. “These works reflect upon our historic architecture and explore the unique light found in the Australian landscape that inspires a dream like atmosphere.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tBec Smith  \r\nMelbourne-based artist Bec Smith’s signature geometric shapes reveal her background as a designer. Harnessing muted pastels and deeper tones, Smith’s works evoke an unforgettable sense of place. “[I was] raised amongst the rich waterway nexus that is the Murray-Darling basin, surrounded by river gums, red sand-hills, pink salt lakes, as well as ancient deserts... My work explores the juxtaposition of nature and cultivation that informed my childhood and family heritage.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tNatalie Rosin\r\nA Sydney-based architectural graduate and ceramicist, Rosin’s work involves the intersection, conflict and dialogue between these disciplines, forming both sculptural and functional handmade ceramic objects. “The Opera House has always been a part of my life, from early years of viewing performances, to studying the design and history in first year architecture at university. This series focuses on the structure of the iconic ‘sails’ and their relationship between one another in terms of scale and arrangement. The aim is to also embrace the negative space between each sail, giving as much weight to the void between one another as the pieces themselves.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Your first glimpse inside Saint Cloche’s collaborative group show, 'Terra Australis Incognito', presented by the Art Annex of Showroom-X.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [700, 735, 712, 730]","tags":[{"name":"Postcards","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Postcards"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Art of the land","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/saint-cloche-blog-tile.jpg?t=1595147111"},"title":"Art of the land","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/art-of-the-land/"}
Art of the land

Art of the land

read more
        
{"author":"Kellie Hush ","date_published":"19th Jul 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"PlaceofInfluence\r\n\r\n\tThe Australian landscape plays a central role in the design process of three internationally celebrated brands: Aje, Romance Was Born and KitX.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“We’re proud that our design DNA has an Australian connotation and beating heart.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tVast and inimitable, one of the many things that makes growing up in Australia so unique is the breathtaking and diverse landscape of our homeland. Whether by Sydney’s picturesque harbourside or Melbourne’s cultural centre, fertile rural farmland, red sand hills or impossibly blue beaches, the landscape inevitably has a lifelong impact on who we are and the way we live. And for many of Australia’s most successful fashion creatives, it continues to influence their design process every day.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tFor Aje co-founders, Adrian Norris and Edwina Forest, Queensland has long played the backdrop to their collective creativity. It also proved to be the genesis for their brand: in 2008, the like-minded best friends sensed a need to bridge the divide between coastal and urban Australian style. Thus, Aje was born.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“12 years on, Edwina and I continue to draw inspiration from our mutual love of the arts, the natural landscape around us, and a celebration of traditional artisanal techniques, craftsmanship and quality of design,” says Norris.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“We both grew up on the Sunshine Coast, so naturally we both will always draw from the Australian landscape in our creative process. Though, in recent collections, we’ve been referencing these design elements through artisan details like a handmade button, or Australian insignia onto a hand-painted print. We’re proud that our design DNA has an Australian connotation and beating heart.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tFor Romance Was Born designer, Anna Plunkett, the landscape plays a both an overt and intuitive role in the collections she designs with the brand’s co-founder, Luke Sales.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“The obvious, literal ways are the flora and fauna we love to weave into our collections, but there’s definitely a subconscious working away as well,” describes Plunkett. “The space and landscape is always there in the background. And growing up in regional Australia makes you more open to ideas, creativity and approaching things in different ways. It also comes through in that we don’t follow trends - we are so far away, and feel comfortable doing our own thing. If you were from Paris you may be more formal in your design approach.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tA glimpse into the Romance Was Born archives reveals an intrinsic penchant for collaboration; the duo have previously worked alongside award-winning local artists including Del Kathryn Barton, and Australian designers Jenny Kee and Linda Jackson. Most recently, Romance re-imaged the works of the late May Gibbs, the creator of the iconic illustrated characters Snugglepot and Cuddlepie. “The collection was a huge success, which was really touching because it’s so nostalgic. Overseas people thought Gibbs’ art was adorable,” reflects Plunkett.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIndustry icon and creative director of KitX, Kit Willow, explains it’s Australia’s easy-going functionality that plays influence on her sustainably-minded designs. “It’s that spirit of Australia. We’re happy-go-lucky, and also very lucky to live here.” Willow also credits the weather as a determining factor for textiles and silhouettes. “We like to show skin and wear light-weight fabrics and, for me, so much of what I design starts with materials like linen and silk.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIt’s a formula that works. The KitX dress, season after season, attracts global fandom, and her customers are eager to align with a brand that makes sustainable sourcing a focus of its long-term strategy. “KitX is Australian fashion with integrity,” says Willow. “People also love the free spirit of KitX… that the clothes don’t wear you, you wear the clothes.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        The Australian landscape plays a central role in the design process of three internationally celebrated brands: Aje, Romance Was Born and KitX.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Kellie Hush\r\n    image: /product_images/import/kellie-hush.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [451, 167, 674, 453, 148]","tags":[{"name":"Mood Board","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Mood+Board"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Place of Influence","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/claire-ridley-instagram.jpg?t=1597641723"},"title":"Place of Influence","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/place-of-influence/"}
Place of Influence

Place of Influence

read more
        
{"author":"Katarina Kroslakova","date_published":"8th Jul 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Kym Ellery\r\n\r\nThe head of a global fashion powerhouse hasn’t forgotten where she comes from.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tKym Ellery might be a proud Parisian resident these days, but the cultural and artistic influences from her upbringing in rural Western Australia, and subsequent emergence as a Sydney fashion authority, continue to resound through her Ellery brand.\r\n\r\n\r\nEllery is now an international success story, with global sales and substantial recognition on the runways of the world’s fashion capitals. Even the fashion-savvy French, with whom she now mingles since relocating from Australia in 2016, are major fans of her work.\r\n\r\n\r\n“The fact that I meet girls [in Paris] who know Ellery, and love it, is exciting and says something for all the hard work we have put in over the years,” she says. “French girls are brought up to love and be aware of art and design and fashion. It’s an important part of their lives, so I’m enjoying that, too.”\r\n\r\n\r\nIn spite of closing the brand’s two Sydney boutiques in 2019 and moving production to Italy, Ellery’s thoughts and designs frequently return to her spiritual home.\r\n\r\n\r\n“I am Australian, always will be,” she says. “Being in nature is something that always inspires me, and Australian nature even more so. How profound it is to walk through the bush; there is so much beauty and so much space to think, to be present and to allow yourself to think creatively.\r\n\r\n\r\n“But also that relaxed energy in Australia. Even talking about art isn’t heavy, there’s a lightness to Australia compared to here. We describe France as the dark forest, and Australia as the field of daisies. They’re very contrasting in the way people think, and how things are done. But I’ve been lucky enough to have part of both.”\r\n\r\n\r\nTying together her two worlds, Ellery made her 2017 debut foray into the world-renowned Paris Fashion Week with the assistance of two Australian friends: artist Benjamin Barretto and curator Joseph Allen Shea.\r\n\r\n\r\n“It was a very important moment, and in order to capture something of the work that I had already done and was presenting to a new audience for the first time in Europe, I decided to collaborate with Ben, an artist who was an inspiration to me,” she explains.\r\n\r\n\r\n“He’s an Australian who was making weavings out of abseiling rope and bricklayers’ line. He would make these beautiful weavings and explore the concept of using these very masculine materials to sit and do a very slow, soft process of weaving to create beautiful wall hanging and tapestry-type artworks.\r\n\r\n\r\n“So when I saw those pieces I was really moved and inspired by them and approached him, and the gallery owner, Joseph, and we collaborated on some pieces for the opening Ellery show. He made some panels to the specified size, and I stitched them into corsets that were then on the runway.”\r\n\r\n\r\nGrowing up watching her mother, Debra, become a successful multi-media artist, Ellery wanted to follow in her footsteps before discovering the magnetic pull of fashion.\r\n\r\n\r\n“I spent a lot of time with her from a very young age, going to her art studio with her friends where she would make ceramics and paint and do print making,” Kym says.\r\n\r\n\r\n“There was a lot of art around me, so it very much influenced who I was; even through high school it was very much what my focus was. Fashion was something I loved but art was who I was. It was a part of me and it still is.\r\n\r\n\r\n“That’s largely influenced how I approach fashion, because even today I still have to remind myself that a collection has to be functional and wearable and beautiful on a female body, but I always look at it as a presentation, as one artwork,” she reflects.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Each collection to me is one concept together. So it’s heavily influenced how I approach design and how I approach clothes as an object, as a usable, functional designed object.”\r\n\r\n\r\nFrom her self-imposed exile in France – “Being based in Paris was always part of my plan since day one” – Ellery still draws inspiration from the Sydney artistic community she discovered when she moved there in the early 2000s.\r\n\r\n\r\n“It was around 2004 that I arrived and there was such a buzz. I discovered this art scene in Surry Hills and this amazing art gallery called China Heights. The owner, Edward (Woodley), is a good friend of mine, and that was the place where I showed my first collection, in his gallery.\r\n\r\n\r\n“I think that moment in time, there was a huge amount of creativity in that community, and a lot of those people I am still very close friends with and I consider influences on my work.”\r\n\r\n\r\nFor Showroom-X, Kym offers an opportunity to purchase from Ellery’s Pre-Fall collection. “That’s a collection I created where I wanted to look at the past of the brand as well as the future, looking into the archives and seeing what pieces I could bring forward and re-establish as part of the key Ellery silhouette,” she says.\r\n\r\n\r\n“We went to the mountains in Switzerland to photograph the collection in St Moritz, and it was really special because we were able to put the collection out in the snow. Each piece was named after a different mountain or someone associated with climbing or climbing paraphernalia, and it was about climbing to the top of the mountain to look around you and observe where you’re at.”\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Kym Ellery\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        The head of a global fashion powerhouse hasn’t forgotten where she comes from.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Katarina Kroslakova\r\n    image: /product_images/import/KK-Head-Shot.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [430, 423, 425, 419]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Kym Ellery","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/kym-ellery-blog-tile.jpg?t=1595146055"},"title":"Kym Ellery","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/kym-ellery/"}
Kym Ellery

Kym Ellery

read more
        
{"author":"Katarina Kroslakova","date_published":"26th Jun 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Personal Best\r\n\r\n\tPutting heart and soul into every garment is all in a day’s work for celebrated Sydney designer, Christopher Esber.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“A lot of my life outside the brand generally finds its way in, just because it is everything I do, everything I love.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tFor Sydney-based designer Christopher Esber, crafting luxurious and technical women’s garments is not merely an act of artistic expression; he considers the process an extension of himself.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“It’s a love project that’s turned into a business,” he confesses. “For me, it’s a very personal thing. A lot of my life outside the brand generally finds its way in, just because it is everything I do, everything I love.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“I never really put something out there just because I know it's going to drive strong sales. There's a reason for every piece.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tEsber established his eponymous brand in 2010, and has since cultivated a devoted and energised following around the world. His Showroom-X exclusive Pre-Fall 20 collection is curated of “pieces to guide you through life,” with classic silhouettes designed “for go-forth women with little time to self-reflect”. Think square-shouldered blazers and cashmere knits, while French lace accents create “soft and delicate moments” throughout. A staple of the brand, precision-tailored ties enter and exit, allowing for transformation within ruched pieces, and beaded glass crystals add a considered nonchalance to evening wear.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAnother Esber signature is parachute cotton, a technical cotton-nylon fabric with an “aerodynamic, floating structure” he utilises to bring a more informal note to his evening wear range. “When we work with evening wear there’s always a premise of something a bit more casual and relaxed about how I want to see women get dressed, so it's nothing too done up,” he says.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“It brings in a new sense of elegance, because you're mixing something that's a bit tough with really feminine shapes that have crystal finishes. So it's just playing with that whole masculine-feminine thing.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“We tend to do a lot of crystal embellishments, because that dry cotton cloth against something quite delicate and shiny is a really nice way to tone down the glamour of crystals, and elevate something as simple as cotton.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n        During the design phase, Esber consciously eschews industry trends, drawing instead upon his own experiences and personal musings for inspiration.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“It might just be an image, or the women around me, or I might see somebody on the street wearing something in a very unique way that is very of the moment,” he describes.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Generally, one collection to the next, it becomes an evolution of the product. We'll do a shirt one season, and then a year and four collections later, we've evolved that same shape into variations of that shirt. There’s always this idea of evolution and just perfecting the craft.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tFabrics themselves also play a role in Esber’s design process. “I might see something that a mill has created and it will trigger an idea, or a mood, or a feeling,” he explains. “And then it starts to brew and all these ideas merge with that someone on the street who might be doing something very interesting, and then I'll remember a blazer we did two seasons ago, but I want to bring it back with this new pocket.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“So it's a bit of a melting pot of what's happening at the moment, but also keeping in mind what the brand stands for, and what we've done in the past, and how do we progress from that?”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAs far as personal style is considered, Esber encourages his customers to wear “whatever makes you happy”.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Just look at what you've worn in the past and what works well for your lifestyle and your body shape, and what you're happy with,” he advises. “Look for silhouettes from different brands that offer a similar cut that you like, and you can explore with colour and how you wear it. And I always urge our customers to have fun with it! Don't feel the need to do a full head-to-toe look; individualise what’s on offer and make it your own.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Personal best\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Putting heart and soul into every garment is all in a day’s work for celebrated Sydney designer, Christopher Esber.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Katarina Kroslakova\r\n    image: /product_images/import/KK-Head-Shot.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [294, 629, 295, 667]","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Personal best","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/wrapped-coast-personal-blog-post.jpg?t=1595147710"},"title":"Personal best","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/personal-best/"}
Personal best

Personal best

read more