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MUSINGS

        
{"author":"Sasha Whiddon and Sally Paton ","date_published":"3rd May 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"What you need to know about fabric dyeing\r\n\r\n\tThe practice of fabric dyeing has existed since our earliest cultures. In Mexico, the Aztecs created their deep blood-red dye from annatto or “achiotl”, the dried seeds of an evergreen shrub. Ancient Egyptian blue has always been called indigo, of “Isatis tinctoria”, the dyestuff extracted from its plant leaves. The Mayans used various organic sources to create dyes; plants, minerals, insects, and mollusks, each colour used for visual storytelling in dress and tapestry. Black was indicative of creation and death, green for the ancestors and the abundance of cacao and tobacco crops, and purple was considered the first colour associated with Mama Oclla, the founding mother of the Inca people.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tToday, we’re still drawn to colour. We pay consultants to instruct us what colours to wear according to our ‘seasonal colour palette’. We have our auras read, in the ancient Chinese tradition, to be assigned ‘our’ colour. We have the right and the wrong colours for ourselves, but what are the wrong colours from an ecological standpoint?\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            “Colour!  \r\n\tWhat a deep and mysterious language, the language of dreams.” - Paul Gaugin\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t“Colour is a power,  \r\n\t\r\n\t it directly influences the soul.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tFabric dying, for the most part, is incredibly unsustainable and an issue that the fashion industry needs to address urgently. Today, the large majority of clothing is dyed synthetically, with detrimental effects on our natural environment. As seen below, the Yangtze River which runs all through China, is one of hundreds of water sources heavily polluted by the fashion industry. Orsola de Castro, the founder of fashionrevolution.org, states, \"There is a joke in China that you can tell the 'it' color of the season by looking at the color of the rivers.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\tThe majority of the water used during the production of garments is for the dyeing process. Following this, billions of tonnes of wastewater are then flushed into water sources completely untreated, containing residual dyes, chemicals, and mordants (a substance used to set dyes on fabrics). The result is water oxygen dissolving to levels that are unable to sustain life. These hazardous and highly toxic chemicals do not break down as they enter water streams, making their way around the world. While retailers and customers worldwide relish in the kaleidoscope of prints and tones from which to select, the ramifications are felt by local communities surrounding production sites. Often, the water is flushed through untraceable pipes meaning no individual brand or retailer can be held accountable for their contribution. Over 70% of water sources in China are heavily contaminated, which results in an estimated 1.4 billion people being unable to access uncontaminated water.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\tWater waste and contamination are indicative of a broader issue in the fashion industry. Many brands, retailers, and companies do not own their manufacturing facilities and instead outsource to less economically developed countries to cut costs, creating a greater profit margin. This lack of accountability and transparency through the manufacturing process puts lives and the future of our planet at risk. Optimistically, more and more labels are increasing supply chain transparency as consumers and investors are holding labels accountable for their sustainability practices.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAt Showroom-X, one of our central ethe is human craft, a step away from the industrial and appreciation of local artistry and the beauty of imperfection.\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIn celebration of human craft and local artistry, Showroom-X has collaborated with Rukaji Designs in curating a collection of 100% Australian silk sarongs and scarves. Looking back to historical techniques of fabric dyeing, each scarf is dyed by hand with naturally occurring Australian earth elements; bark, rust, red dirt, and botanicals such as tea tree.  These elemental pigments capture the diversity and geographical drama of the West Australian landscape. Led by matriarch Eva Nargoodah and her eldest daughter Ivy, the Nargoodah family are passionate creators and cultural keepers, having developed their textile designs over many years. Rukaji are proud to keep the cultural practices that surround bush medicines and dyes alive, teaching their children and broader community about these essential practices. The profits from each purchase are reinvested back into the Rukaji family business to support the creation of new artworks. This acts to support local economies by facilitating income streams for the artists.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWolfgang Scout is another label who’s fabric dyeing techniques reflect their overall commitment to tread lightly. Leading the way for a more sustainable future, Wolfgang Scout is synonymous with super-soft knitwear, handwoven from Australian Merino wool and designed with purpose to minimise waste and water usage. Their entire hand-dyeing process is done within Australia with organic, certified non-hazardous, non-chrome dyes, with a low impact on the environment and minimal water wasted. Further, their linens are dyed with natural eucalyptus.  This artisanal approach harkens back to a different, earlier time and produces investment pieces to be cherished. Founders Natalie Wood, Carla Woidt, and Marianne Horton have built a brand around the philosophy of interwoven connections; to people, places, and the natural environment.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tAt Showroom-X, one of our central ethe is human craft, a step away from the industrial and appreciation of local artistry and the beauty of imperfection. We love the words of artist David Hockey, “I prefer living in color (sic)”, but it’s integral to take pause to consider how the shades,  tones, and patterns of the clothes we wear each day have come to pass.  We can actively choose which brands and what processes we want to support. So, choose wisely, choose your future.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\tSources:\r\n\r\n\r\n\tCultural Heritage.com\r\n\r\n\r\n\tLupine Publishers.com\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAncient.edu\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        The practice of fabric dyeing has existed since our earliest cultures. In Mexico, the Aztecs created their deep blood-red dye from annatto or “achiotl”, the dried seeds of an evergreen shrub.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sasha Whiddon and Sally Paton\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Sally-Sasha.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-linen/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1369,1368,1006,1007,1003,899]","tags":[{"name":"learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"What you need to know about fabric dyeing","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/untitled-1.png?t=1620005968"},"title":"What you need to know about fabric dyeing","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/what-you-need-to-know-about-fabric-dyeing/"}
What you need to know about fabric dyeing

What you need to know about fabric dyeing

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{"author":"Sasha Whiddon and Sally Paton","date_published":"29th Apr 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Danielle on Fibre Trace\r\n\r\n\tBefore hanging in our wardrobe, the clothes we wear pass through countless hands. Take a cotton t-shirt: The cotton is picked, ginned, spun, woven, sewn into garments, and shipped to warehouse and retail stores. It will be sold, worn, washed, repaired, donated, and most often ends its life as untraceable waste.”\r\n\r\n\r\nDanielle Statham wants to change this.  Since the earliest age she can remember, Danielle knew that she wanted to be in fashion, “I was one of those lucky girls who always knew what I wanted to do… The love of textiles and design has been taken through the rest of my life.” Having now worked within the full supply chain, Danielle is passionate about closing the loop in fashion, so we can know exactly where our clothes start their lifecycle. Alongside like-minded leaders in the global textile industry, in 2018, Danielle founded FibreTrace. This technology allows the life cycle of a garment to be traced, from farm to shelf, with full transparency.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"I’m very tactile,  \r\n\tand I loved that old-school, hand-stitched couture.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"My love of the raw fibre \r\n\t\r\n\t was grown from being \r\n\t\r\n\ton \r\n\tthe cotton farm so early”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Australia is seen as a golden child for many reasons, especially at the moment with the pandemic, for being able to get on with things, make great decisions, and stand on our own two feet.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me a little about your personal and professional background? \r\n\t I grew up in the racing industry in NSW, and I’m sure seeing beautifully dressed people developed my early love of fashion. I got married very young and had my first baby when I was 24. Before that, I studied fashion and textiles, but I also majored in millinery. It was a big passion of mine, I’m very tactile, and I loved that old-school, hand-stitched couture. For over thirty years, I’ve been a milliner. I studied under the Royal milliner in London, which was a lovely experience. He was the Queen’s milliner, and had a very close relationship with Princess Diana. It was really lovely to have those stories told to me. I also owned a wholesale and distribution agency and started a denim label. I saw that an interesting marketing exercise would be to have my own cotton in my own denim. I thought that it would be a really nice experience for the consumer. But I found it very difficult to have that cotton back in my own product.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tAnd your husband’s family is involved in farming cotton? \r\nI met my husband David when I was 20. He was a cotton grower, and his family are first-generation farmers. He didn’t grow up on a farm, and it wasn’t until the late 80s that his family saw the opportunity in agriculture and purchased Keytah, our cotton farm. David was straight out of school, no university, straight to the school of the land.  We are certified carbon-positive cotton.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat was the genesis of FibreTrace? \r\nMy love of the raw fibre was grown from being on the cotton farm so early, and the textiles it can create, and so that’s where FibreTrace came into play, and the Good Earth Cotton brand as well. FibreTrace is a technology that provides the irrefutable and truthful information of a product. A luminescent pigment is put into the raw material and once that pigment has blown through that fibre, it’s there for life.\r\n\r\n\r\nThis physical tracer within that raw fibre is connected to a digital blockchain platform. Essentially, the aim is to give a 20/20 vision of the supply chain, providing full transparency of the farm and beyond. This includes the emissions of the product, which is really important.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there anything unique about Australia which made you believe it would be a great fit for the FibreTrace model? \r\nI think we’re seen as clean, ethical, and forward-thinking. If we can tell that story from an Australian brand perspective, from farm to shelf, with full transparency, it creates a compelling narrative for the overseas customer.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat excites you about the current Australian creative landscape? \r\nWe’re so good at what we do creatively here in Australia. We’re very methodical, detail-oriented, and I think we’re naturally brought up with great morals and ethics. Because we’re such a small country in terms of population, Australians have had to think laterally to succeed in business. I wish we had more manufacturing and I really hope we can onshore more in the future. I think that would be so well-received in this current climate, not just for our local market, but particularly for an international market. Australia is seen as a golden child for many reasons, especially at the moment with the pandemic, for being able to get on with things, make great decisions, and stand on our own two feet. I think our small population allows us to be more nimble.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWho are some of your favourite designers,  local and international? \r\nWe’ve got so many amazing labels in Australia. We’ve had two great launches with FibreTrace, one being the Australian brand Nobody Denim, and in recent times the LA label, Reformation. When you’re on the front, you can love what you see visually, but when you start to get into the nitty-gritty working with some of these brands, you grow such enormous respect not only from an aesthetic viewpoint but from an honest marketing and business standpoint. I think digging deeper into Nobody and Reformation and meeting the people who operate them, they’re doing such a great job.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat does the term luxury fashion mean to you? \r\nA state of great comfort. Whether that be something that’s expensive or inexpensive, it’s luxurious to you and how you perceive it, your state of  mind. It’s something that makes you feel good.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you look for in your personal style? \r\nComfort. Denim and a soft jacket, a gorgeous t-shirt. Anything that goes with flat shoes because I have four kids and I have to move fast. I’ve really grown out of high heels. I refuse to wear anything higher than an inch. I live in Queensland, so I love a lovely pair of sandals.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhy do you believe that transparency is so important in the fashion industry? \r\nAcross the industry, globally, I think that supply chains have become so multi-tiered.  So that’s made traceability and transparency so problematic for brands. Particularly for cotton, which is one of the most used fibers in the supply chain. It passes through so many hands before it becomes fabric. When a brand is serious about the claims that they’re prepared to make public, it needs to be conclusive with transparent information.  They need to be able to satisfy those savvy customers, like my kids, who want an honest conversation around where their garments came from, the supply chain that it travelled, the emissions it created, and also the ethical standards, which we’re seeing a greater focus on at the moment.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow will this technology impact the industry moving forward? \r\nWe believe FibreTrace will bring those in the industry who champion best practices forward to the front of the line. I think it will enable unique and true storytelling for brands.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about the Nobody Denim collection you have been working on. \r\nJohn Condilis is so passionate about his Aussie-made product. He was so excited about keeping that industry in Australia and creating ethical garments with low-impact fibers. Unfortunately, we don’t have any spinning left in Australia, so we did have to go offshore, but once the fabric was back in the country, everything else was completely Australian. That is something we should definitely support and be proud of. It was more about providence for John because we know in our country that we’re doing everything ethically correct. He chose a great partner in Orta Anadolu in Turkey who has great ethical standards and fantastic environmental impacts in their fabric production. That was such a great starting point for a soft launch for FibreTrace. I was so proud that we could do that with an Australian brand. Nobody has just launched their second collection with FibreTrace, and I know that John wants to take this through the whole collection. We’re working on that.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n         Danielle is passionate about closing the loop in fashion, so we can know exactly where our clothes start their lifecycle. Alongside like-minded leaders in the global textile industry, in 2018, Danielle founded FibreTrace.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton & Sasha Whiddon\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-Sasha.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-linen/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1005, 884, 1269,653]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Danielle on Fibre Trace","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/hhhh.jpg?t=1619686023"},"title":"Danielle on Fibre Trace","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/danielle-on-fibre-trace/"}
Danielle on Fibre Trace

Danielle on Fibre Trace

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{"author":"Sasha Whiddon","date_published":"9th Apr 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Let’s talk about Merino Wool\r\n\tAfter what felt like an endless summer, the colder months are finally catching up to us. The sun is setting that little bit earlier and we’re now rising before daylight. There’s a chill in the air. Our woolly knits are being pulled to the front of our wardrobes, and sandals are swapped for boots.\r\n\t\r\n\tThough synonymous with crisp, winter weather, Merino wool is a more versatile fabric than you may appreciate. Beyond your crew-neck knit, oversized scarf, and the classic Australian Ugg boot, Merino wool is often the base of many cross-seasonal designs, from activewear to light-weight suiting.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"“Wool is most beautiful, most kind to our  \r\n\tskin and best for the earth in its natural form.” - Wolfgang Scout\r\n\"“We believe in treading lightly\r\n\t\r\n\t on this earth and creating\r\n\t\r\n\tlong-lasting products...” - W.S\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhat is Merino Wool?\r\n\tWe have a long history with wool. Around 1950 the saying that Australia ‘rode on the sheep’s back’ entered our lexicon, alluding to wool as the source of our nation’s prosperity. Wool is one of our heirloom exports. Those who bred sheep and sheared their fleece came to symbolise and epitomise what it was to be Australian.\r\n\t\r\n\t\tMerino wool is a natural fibre grown by Merino sheep, a breed that produces the finest wool for high-quality, luxury apparel. It’s a softer and thinner wool, making it more versatile and easier to work with. Consequently, Merino has a softer hand feel in comparison to other wool, so the garments it produces can be worn comfortably against the skin. The vast majority of Australia’s sheep flock is Merino, and Australia produces 81% of the world’s ‘superfine’ wool.\r\n\t\r\n\t\tThough our near 4000 dedicated sheep shearers work amongst the harsh Australian elements, the lanolin, or wool yolk, gifts shearers with the softest of hands.\r\n\t“We believe in treading lightly on this earth and creating long-lasting products to be worn well and passed down to future generations.” - Wolfgang Scout \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\tWhy we love Merino Wool.\r\n\tA wholly natural fibre, Merino wool offers its wearer a multitude of benefits. The natural fibre allows for thermoregulation. This means that, during those warmer days, Merino will transport sweat away from the skin, to keep the wearer cool and dry. In contrast, when it’s colder the natural ‘crimps and bends’ in the fibres trap air, which mimics insulation to retain heat. Thus, it’s not uncommon to see merino wool used for high-quality sportswear. The wool also contains odour resisting properties, as it has a larger capacity than other fibres to absorb liquid.\r\n\t\r\n\tThe benefits of Merino wool extend to the environment. As the shorn fleece of a sheep, it is an entirely renewable and regenerative resource. If left untreated or dyed naturally, the fibres are completely biodegradable, preventing the garments from adding to landfill. After about 12 months in the ground, it will have decomposed, returning to nature.\r\n\t\r\n\tImpact of producing Merino wool on the animals.\r\n\tWhen reviewing fabrications borne from a living creature, it’s crucial that we consider the welfare of the animal. Merino sheep's most common breed is the Peppin sheep, originally bred by the Peppin family in the 1860s. In order to produce more wool, the sheep are bred to have wrinkly skin. This breeding resulted in sheep producing roughly twice as much fine, high-quality wool. Proper care and maintenance are essential for the well-being of flocks. When not shorn on a timely schedule, these sheep can suffer from life-threatening heat exhaustion during Australia’s warmer months.\r\n\t\r\n\tDue to breeding, Peppin sheep are also vulnerable to flystrike, a parasitic infection with a significant mortality rate if left untreated. As a preventative measure, a controversial procedure called mulesing is performed. This is when skin near the buttocks of a sheep is removed.  While it’s effective at preventing flystrike, it can be incredibly traumatic for the sheep and puts their welfare at risk. Until recent years mulesing was performed without the use of painkillers or anesthetic. However, there has been improvement in Australia, with an estimate of 80% of sheep now receiving pain treatment.\r\n\t\r\n\tNew Zealand has taken a stronger stance against this issue, and since 2018, mulesing has been banned nationwide. Following suit, many retailers who produce Merino goods will now clearly state if their products come from non-mulesed sheep. Bales of wool can be certified either non-mulesed or pain relief used. Many European buyers are moving away from Australian wool as fashion companies turning to a more transparent supply structure.\r\n\t\r\n\tBrands who focus on the ethical production of Merino.\r\n\tAt Showroom-X, we are proud to work alongside Australian brands who are responsibly sourcing Merino wool. Among the brands privileging the welfare of sheep and the planet over profit are Wolfgang Scout and Bassike.\r\n\t\r\n\tWolfgang Scout, brought to life by Carla Woidt and Marianne Horton, is renowned for their high-quality merino garments. The two women at the helm of the brand make sure that their yarn is fully traceable back to the grower. This ensures non-mulesed sheep and RWS (responsible wool standard) certified wool, meaning the animals and the land are treated with care and respect. \r\n“We believe in treading lightly on this earth and creating long-lasting products to be worn well and passed down to future generations.” - Wolfgang Scout\r\n\t\r\n\tTheir wool is also 100% Australian Superfine Merino, a measurement used to describe the diameter of wool fibre, which is a quality micron rarely found in hand-knit garments. Wolfgang Scout has also eliminated the use of chemicals through the scouring, carding and combing process.\r\n “Wool is most beautiful, most kind to our skin and best for the earth in its natural form.” - Wolfgang Scout\r\n\t\r\n\tBassike was founded back in 2006 with the aim of creating sustainable wardrobe staples.  They’ve made a conscious effort to manufacture and source with the environment in mind from inception. This is reflected in the production of their woolen garments, with materials being sourced from Italian suppliers utilising non-mulesed sheep.\r\n\t\r\n\tWe are grateful that there are Australian brands who cherish the importance of sheep and their woolen fleece to our nation’s past and present. With a little research, there are sustainable options available to us all to ensure the wellness of not only the sheep but our planet. Next time you pull on your favourite woolen sweater or Merino blazer, we hope you consider the process your garment went through from the sheep’s back, to yours. It’s up to us to make the conscious decision.\r\n\t\r\n\tSources:\r\n\tWoolmark\r\n\tWolfgang Scout\r\n\tBassike\r\n\tABC\r\n\tFarm Online\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Though synonymous with crisp, winter weather, Merino wool is a more versatile fabric than you may appreciate. Beyond your crew-neck knit, oversized scarf, and the classic Australian Ugg boot, Merino wool is often the base of many cross-seasonal designs, from activewear to light-weight suiting.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sasha Whiddon and Sally Paton\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Sasha-Whiddon.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-linen/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1281,900,1008,1141,1007,901]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Let’s talk about Merino Wool","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/mw-parralax-1-image-3.jpg?t=1617964163"},"title":"Let’s talk about Merino Wool","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/lets-talk-about-merino-wool/"}
Let’s talk about Merino Wool

Let’s talk about Merino Wool

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{"author":"Showroom-X","date_published":"9th Apr 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"NOW OPEN\r\n\r\n\tWhere digital meets experiential. Immerse yourself in Showroom-X’s new luxury concept space.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"Each facet of the boutique was \r\n\tmindfully selected or repurposed.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"to have the least amount  \r\n\t\r\n\t impact on the environment...\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tDesigned with as much consideration for the planet and our products as our online platform, our mission is to bring customers a retail experience like no other. Open by appointment for one-on-one wardrobe consultations and exclusive preview access to forthcoming collections, Showroom-X’s in-store experience is an innovative alternative to the current brick-and-mortar retail market.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tOr if you are passing by and feel the need to just pop on in for a cuddle (or covid friendly version of) please do so.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Our curtains are repurposed from remnant fabrications, and all furniture is either for sale or upcycled. We have removed parts of the original roof and are using the raw materials to design new feature walls. The flooring has been stripped back to its original form, with interior lighting elements salvaged or crafted by artists for sale and wall treatments crafted from natural fibres.\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nOur intention through Showroom-X and our new space is to be a leader in the sustainability space, not a follower, which is why each facet of the boutique was mindfully selected or repurposed to have the least amount of impact on the environment or people, while still remaining true to our premium luxury aesthetic.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Immerse yourself in Showroom-X’s new luxury concept space, soon-to-be opened.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Showroom-X\r\n    image: /product_images/import/L-parallax-3-image-9.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-linen/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1033, 1038, 706,725]","tags":[{"name":"Portfolio","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolio"}],"thumbnail":null,"title":"Now Open","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/now-open/"}

Now Open

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{"author":"Sasha Whiddon","date_published":"31st Mar 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Let’s talk about fast fashion\r\n\tIf you’ve heard the phrase ‘Fast Fashion’ thrown around and not felt completely sure what it means - you’re not alone. It’s a term whose use has grown in frequency over the last few years, with brands now going to great pains to counteract the damage fast fashion has wrought on the environment.\r\n\t\r\n\tAs we all continue to grow and strive for a more sustainable future, it’s necessary to educate ourselves on what constitutes fast fashion as well as its myriad ethical and environmental impacts. The Good Trade defines it as -\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"“A design, manufacturing, and marketing method \r\n\tfocused on rapidly producing high volumes of clothing.\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tAt a glance, it’s easy to assume fast fashion is limited to cheap and mass produced clothing, and though this is correct it’s only the tip of the iceberg. Fast fashion is also synonymous with unsustainable and unethical practices, ranging anywhere from manufacturing with non-biodegradable or low quality fabrications, trend replication, poor working conditions, over-working and not earning a liveable wage despite some employees working almost 70 hours a week.\r\n\t\r\n\tIn many cases, the ways in which these cheap garments are produced violate numerous basic human rights, as well as an individual’s personal ethics. According to the Garment Working Centre (a worker rights organization encouraging an anti-sweatshop to enhance conditions for garment workers),\r\n\t“Approximately 85% of garment workers do not earn the minimum wage and are instead paid a piece rate of between 2-6 cents per piece.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tSustainable fashion cannot subsist without transparency. This is why at Showroom-X we stock brands that are open and informative regarding their manufacturing processes. From brands such as KITX, who pride themselves on complete transparency, and ensure a fair, safe and healthy working conditions and guarantee environmental responsibility throughout their supply chain, to Lee Mathews, ESSE Studios, Jac + Jack, Matin, Matteau and Bassike, we actively champion labels who are conscious and transparent about their products and their processes.\r\n\t\r\n\tWhere European retail giant ZARA needs only a little over a week to design, produce and stock a new product on the shelves, it would comparatively take a smaller, more sustainable business at least six months. These brands need our support now more than ever.\r\nSources:\r\n\tGarment Worker Center\r\n\tForbes\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        If you’ve heard the phrase ‘Fast Fashion’ thrown around and not felt completely sure what it means - you’re not alone. It’s a term whose use has grown in frequency over the last few years, with brands now going to great pains to counteract the damage fast fashion has wrought on the environment.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sasha Whiddon\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Sasha-Whiddon.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-linen/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1169, 1145, 1230,1222]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Fast Fashion ","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/adut-by-craid-mcdean.jpg?t=1617092483"},"title":"Fast Fashion ","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/fast-fashion/"}
Fast Fashion

Fast Fashion

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{"author":"Showroom-X","date_published":"11th Mar 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"KATARINA KROSLAKOVA\r\n\r\n\tJournalist, editor and content director Katarina Kroslakova is in the business of storytelling. “I love delving into people’s success journeys and re-telling those experiences so others can learn and be inspired.”\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tSpurred by some negative experiences with the media in her teens, Kroslakova ('KK' for short) took matters into her own hands. “Like every arrogant teenager who thinks they’re invincible, I thought to myself, ‘Hey, I could do better than that…’ I landed my first ever job with the BBC in London and the rest is history. Now, I do my utmost to represent people’s stories with truth, integrity and context.”\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tKroslakova is no stranger to multitasking, having helmed AFR’s Life & Leisure and Luxury magazines and starting her own content creation business, Primary Ideas, (among many other roles). Now, she is embarking upon one of her most exciting projects yet – bringing the New York Times’ style magazine, T Magazine, to Australian audiences. “Well, I’m proud to say The New York Times first approached me. We’d had a very successful working relationship for many years through my other jobs, and hopefully they saw something in me that showed them I could bring the T concept to Australia,” she says of her new role as T Australia’s publisher and editor. “Honestly, it’s such an honour to work on this brand. I mean, it’s madness, on a daily basis, and I’m pushing myself and the entire team to find new reserves of energy and creativity. But the reward will be worth it.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"Professionally, I look up to entrepreneurs and those willing to share \r\n\ttheir lessons and learnings.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"I share stories, really.\r\n\t\r\n\t I also help other people  \r\n\t\r\n\ttell \r\n\ttheir own stories.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhat can we expect from T Australia’s print and digital platforms? \r\n\t A strong sense of Australia, and all that entails. I want the brand to be a journal of record of where we’re at as a nation. I want to showcase the best of Australia, from our culture to our fashion, photographed in our unique style. And don’t forget our world-famous sense of humour, too.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhat does a standard day look like for you at the moment? \r\nI wake up, begrudgingly, around 5.50am because my two boys, aged 3 and 4, think sleep-ins are over-rated. Then it’s two double-shot coffees for breakfast, pre-school drop offs, and the laptop swings open for webinars, Zooms, commissioning, editing, finance spreadsheets (ugh…). I meet with PRs, advertisers, writers, advisers. Because I’m both Publisher and Editor-in-Chief, my role is incredibly varied. The key thing for me in anything I do in life is to grow and learn. And boy, has this been an epic growth journey!\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhat do you find most exciting about the current Australian creative landscape? \r\nThanks to a certain pandemic, we’ve had the most incredible influx of talent, whether it’s people stuck here, or coming back home. We’ve been spoilt for choice putting the magazine together with the best writers, stylists, photographers, models. I think exciting things will come this year from this talent pool.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style? \r\nIt has, unexpectedly, changed a lot. I was definitely a mix and match girl before I had kids, lots of bling, lots of colour, texture, more is more. Now, I’m literally the opposite. My preferred garment these days is definitely a shirt-dress, which is versatile and elegant. I unashamedly love shoes and handbags, which makes birthdays and Christmas easy for my Italian husband, who has bought half my wardrobe thanks to his impeccable taste.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWho are some of your favourite designers (local and international)? \r\nMy youngest son is called Valentino. For a reason. I also adored Karl Lagerfeld. So I have quite a few of both Valentino and Chanel. In fact, I have a vintage Valentino dress that Elizabeth Taylor once owned; I bought it at auction from her estate a few years back. \r\nMy stylist introduced me to Matin about three years ago when I was doing an Editor’s photo shoot and I fell in love straight away. SIR. is one of the most exciting labels to come from Australia in recent times, I’m excited to see what they do next. And ESSE’s aesthetic speaks to me. I love the silhouettes and beautiful draping. \r\nFor handbags, my go-to brands are Bottega Veneta, Celine, Proenza Schouler. For shoes, I’m basically a museum of Tom Ford.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe you can’t do without? \r\nI have a rainbow of Nobody jeans – every colour, every fit. I can dress them up with a navy Stella McCartney jacket, and I’m ready for (almost) anything.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tDescribe your personal approach to beauty … \r\nInvest in good quality skincare. I do wear make up nearly every day, just because of the nature of my job, and if I start the day (or night before) with a good, solid skincare routine, I feel better for it.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWho are your idols – professional and personal? \r\nProfessionally, I look up to entrepreneurs and those willing to share their lessons and learnings. I like Mark Bouris, he’s got a pragmatic, can-do attitude and doesn’t suffer fools. \r\nPersonally, I have an incredible group of girlfriends who run their own businesses, and often juggle it all with kids, pets, husbands and well, life. I can complain, commiserate, celebrate, whatever is necessary – and I know it will resonate!\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhat (or who) else is currently inspiring your world (music, film, art, literature, etc) …  \r\nI’m obsessed with good magazine covers at the moment, so I’ve been inspired by the creative teams behind Vanity Fair, The New Yorker of course, The Economist, Empire, TIME. A good cover is a work of art. The Chinese classical pianist Lang Lang has a new album of J.S.Bach’s Goldberg Variations out now, so that’s been my background on repeat.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Journalist, editor and content director Katarina Kroslakova is in the business of storytelling. “I love delving into people’s success journeys and re-telling those experiences so others can learn and be inspired.”\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Showroom-X\r\n    image: /product_images/import/L-parallax-3-image-9.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-linen/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [221, 334, 335, 290]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Katarina Kroslakova","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/nobody-jeans.jpg?t=1615447943"},"title":"Katarina Kroslakova","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/katarina-kroslakova/"}
Katarina Kroslakova

Katarina Kroslakova

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{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"8th Mar 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"GRACE FORREST ON INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY\r\n\tIn honour of International Women’s Day 2021, we talk transparency, the rights of women in the fashion industry and female inspirations with activist, abolitionist and founding director of international human rights group Walk Free, Grace Forrest.\r\n\tDescribe what it means to be a woman in the fashion industry in 2021 … \r\nAs a woman working in the field of international human rights, modern slavery intersects with the fashion industry far more often than it should.  In fact, \r\n\tThe Global Slavery Index ranks the fashion industry among the five most high-risk industries in the world.\r\n\t\r\nModern slavery and fashion supply chains disproportionately impact women. Conservatively we estimate one in every 130 women ON EARTH is living in a modern slavery. A hard fact to comprehend as we celebrate International Women’s Day.\r\n\t\r\n\tGrab any garment in your wardrobe, and you can be pretty confident it was made by a woman. Flash marketing, the rise of fast fashion and endless collections by luxury brands, even the sustainability movement, disconnect us  from the reality that the clothes we wear were made by real people with real lives. It’s an exception, rather than the rule, that brands disclose the working conditions under which their shiny final products are made.\r\n\t\r\n\tWe can’t call ourselves feminists if we do not value the lives and rights of the women behind the clothes we wear.  Nothing highlights this irony more than shirts emblazoned with “GirlBoss” and “Girls Can”, while the women who made them don’t even have the right to a living wage or basic workplace protections.\r\n\t\r\n\t As a woman who loves fashion, I am determined to ensure the narrative of this industry is radically re-imagined. The definition of sustainability, a word trending across the global fashion landscape, must be expanded to include information and policy frameworks to protect people at every level of the supply chain. You can be assured, that any brand which claims to “protect the planet” while exploiting people, will never do right by either.\r\n\t\r\n\tI am so proud to work with some incredible Australian brands and designers who are swimming against the tide, to ensure that the journey of the clothing is respectful to people and planet from start to finish.\r\n\t\r\n\t I love clothes, and the expression is allows each and every one of us – at its core I believe sustainability is looking after what you already own, regardless of where that garment comes from. While we can’t buy our way into a more ethical world, there is such a vital role for the consumer to ask questions about the origins of the clothing we buy, before adding pieces (ideally made to last) where greatly loved or needed.\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\tRelated reading:\r\n\tFashion identified as one of five key industries implicated in modern slavery\r\n\tRebuilding Fashion from COVID\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            “Modern slavery and fashion supply chains  \r\n\tdisproportionately impact women”\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\nWhat women are currently inspiring your world (and why)? \r\nSo many incredible women inspire my world, from near and far. First and foremost, I am inspired by my mother and my grandmothers, all incredible women, all who have and continue to break down barriers in their chosen fields be it as pilots, artists or early childhood specialists. They are all style icons to me, in their own way.\r\n\t\r\n Within my space I am inspired everyday by the women who I work with at Walk Free, as well as female leaders around the world fighting to tackle injustice – such as Grace Tame, Nimko Ali, Bernice King, Vanessa Nakate and Jacinda Ardern.\r\nI’m inspired by women paving the way through and within the hard conversations about how this industry must transform.  Some in the fashion industry include: Aja Barber (@AjaBarber), Orsola de Castro (Co-Founder of Fashion Revolution @Fash_Rev), Jeanne DeKroon (Founder of Zazi Vintage @jeannedekroon + @zazi.vintage) and Venetia LaManna (Co-founder of @rememberwhomadethem @VenetiaLamanna). As well as creators like Maggie Marilyn (@maggiemarilyn), Kit Willow (@KitX) and Ashton Cameron (of @MountainandMoon).\r\n\tIn your opinion, what makes the Australian women’s fashion industry so special or unique? \r\nWhat makes us unique in my opinion is our individualism born of isolationism. We are a country of both unique privilege and challenge.\r\n\t\r\nI don’t believe that any Australian wants to buy something that harmed another human being in the process. On the contrary, I think we strive to support local and Australian made where we can, but this isn’t the only way we can ensure we’re investing in our values when we’re buying new things. I believe our fashion industry could become world-leading in the ethical and sustainable landscape by moving to ensure that our values and principles of fairness are extended off our shores and into our global supply chains. It’s not ok that some Australian brands, selling dresses for hundreds of dollars under the guise of luxury goods, don’t even ensure a basic living wage for the people who make their clothes.\r\nTransparency, coupled with accountability, is what will transform this industry. We have national legislative support for this through the Australian Modern Slavery Act, and an increasing level of  consumer and media awareness to hold those at the top to account.\r\n\t\r\n We vote for the kind of world we want to live in everyday with the way we spend our money. So where possible, why not support brands actively working to do the right things? From a purchase as small as your morning coffee (choose Fairtrade) to a larger investment for your wardrobe, put your money behind brands and groups that are working to make our world a fairer, safer place to live in for all people.\r\n\t\r\nWith more women and girls living in modern slavery than there are people living in Australia, there has never been a more urgent time to call for mass transparency and accountability in the fashion industry. From the women who make our clothes, to the women who wear them, we are all connected.  We progress together, or not at all.\r\n\tRelated reading: \r\n\tThe origins of International Women’s Day\r\n\tModern Slavery Act explained\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nAll imagery courtesy of @graceforrest\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        In honour of International Women’s Day 2021, we talk transparency, the rights of women in the fashion industry and female inspirations with activist, abolitionist and founding director of international human rights group Walk Free, Grace Forrest.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-linen/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1167, 1168, 1169,1154]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Grace Forrest On International Women's Day","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/121511707-406842020480094-2083545640484158031-n.jpg?t=1614757568"},"title":"Grace Forrest On International Women's Day","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/grace-forrest-on-international-womens-day/"}
Grace Forrest On International Women's Day

Grace Forrest On International Women's Day

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{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"13th Feb 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"KITTY CLARK\r\n\r\n\tFor founder and director of Saint Cloche gallery, Kitty Clark, her work is about so much more than just staging exhibitions – describing herself as “a producer and curator of talent and potential across many creative avenues”\r\n\r\n\r\nFor founder and director of Saint Cloche gallery, Kitty Clark, her work is about so much more than just staging exhibitions – describing herself as “a producer and curator of talent and potential across many creative avenues”. Clark launched the Paddington (Sydney) gallery six years ago, as an avenue to support emerging and mid-career artists.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"I have to have a  \r\n\tdeep connection to the work in order to want to represent them\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"It’s important to me that the \r\n\t\r\n\t artists themselves  \r\n\trealise their \r\n\t\r\n\town \r\n\tauthentic storytelling ability.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tOf the current creative landscape, Clark is invigorated by the surge of interest in artistic pursuits. “Since COVID we’ve seen a surge in people wanting to connect and seeking out great art. I think that’s because art helps inspire and heal in these difficult times,” she explains.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“People travel to other worlds voyeuristically through art even though we are having to be stuck at home. I know I do this myself.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tTell me a little about your upbringing – where you we born and raised, what your family was like? \r\n\t I was born in Malaysia and raised in a little town called Klang, close to a port … I remember Mango, Papaya and Coconut trees in the garden with chooks running around. In the mornings we would go to the local farmers markets together to buy our food. I spent a lot of hours in the kitchen watching my grandma cook and also tending to her veggie and flower garden. These are some of my most fond childhood memories.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhat drew you to the world of art? What do you love most about it? \r\nI started out wanting to be an artist and got side-tracked by the fashion industry which, back then, was far more creative, I feel. With my Asian upbringing, being an artist was probably not thought of as the best career in order to put food on the table - not that my parents discouraged it, but they worried about my being able to make a good living out of being a struggling artist.\r\n\r\n\r\nI was looking for more creative freedom and coming from the corporate world of fashion I was drawn once more into the art world, but rather than being the artist, I now produce and nurture other emerging artists and am still quite connected to fashion in that I am still inspired by that world and draw from that world. Curation and producing interesting, innovative exhibitions is my own personal art form.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAre you working on any exhibitions you can tell us about at the moment? \r\nEmily Imeson with Ancient River, River Red, which is the next show. I love her story where she decided to give up living in ‘society’ and adventures through the outback, immersing herself in traversing this great land in her trusted [Toyota] Troopy to gain a better understanding of her relationship to the land.\r\n\r\n\r\nDavid Whitworth, with his debut solo show Falling Awake which will feature a series of humble, quiet observations of moments expressed through painting a variety of special spots he frequents that he feels, give him a sense of place.\r\n\r\n\r\nFollowing her successful first solo show at Sydney Contemporary 2019, I am very excited for Evi O’s upcoming second solo show, GIANT. In this body of work, Evi investigates the light and dark sides of big matters. In physical form, natural and man-made monoliths help identify our place in the universe.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style? \r\nDay-to-day I like relaxed luxury, feeling confident and comfortable at the same time is essential. Dressing for occasions I love ‘mod’ silhouettes - fine tailoring with a nod to 60s symmetry in distinctive materials and block colours with a hint of jewellery. For work events I love wearing structured blazers (I have an obsession with blazers), with a silk tank or fine cotton tee, and a relaxed fit pant or jeans and mid-height heels to elevate the look.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWho are some of your favourite designers? \r\nInternational: Saint Laurent, Gucci, Chanel, Christopher Kane, Junya Watanabe, Francoise, Giuliva Heritage Collection, Valentino. I also love seeking out vintage luxury pieces. Australian designers: Scanlan Theodore, KitX, Matteau, Ellery, R.M. Williams.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you can’t do without? \r\nI can’t go past a relaxed fit crisp white shirt – a section of my wardrobe is dedicated to my collection of white shirts. Black Leather sandals. I don’t leave the house without sunglasses.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhat you think about the concept of ‘beauty’ in the modern age? \r\nDiversity, being natural, confident and being authentic is true beauty.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWho are your idols? \r\nDefinitely Tom Ford – he is one person I admire and why I wanted to be in fashion and aspired to, and eventually did work for Gucci. Pierre Cardin, known as ‘fashion’s architect’, his innovative designs transcended into sculpture and architecture - both of them showed such versatility as creatives which is so inspiring to me.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        For founder and director of Saint Cloche gallery, Kitty Clark, her work is about so much more than just staging exhibitions – describing herself as “a producer and curator of talent and potential across many creative avenues”\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-linen/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1033, 1038, 706,725]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"KITTY CLARK","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/saint-cloche-instagram-kitty-clarke.jpg?t=1613119748"},"title":"KITTY CLARK","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/kitty-clark/"}
KITTY CLARK

KITTY CLARK

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{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"4th Feb 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Everything you need to know about upcycling\r\n\r\n\tIt’s impossible to have a conversation about fashion at the moment without addressing the 500,000-tonne elephant in the room: textile waste.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nSynonymous with warm climate wardrobes, linen has grown to become one of the most popular and versatile fabrications in use locally. For this edition of Showroom-X Learnings, we break down the material and explore some of the biggest advantages and misconceptions surrounding linen. And that figure isn’t just plucked from the imagination – according to research published by McKinsey & Co -\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            More than \r\n\t500,000 tonnes of textiles are discarded into Australian landfillannually.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nWith production still on the rise, \r\n\t\r\n\tthere’s never been a more important time to discuss upcycling\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n “Upcycling is the practice of creating a useable product from waste or unwanted items or adapting an existing product in some way to add value. The purpose of upcycling is reducing waste and improving the efficiency of resource use” (as defined by whatis.com).\r\n\r\n\r\nIn the fashion industry, this could mean taking old, worn or stained products and repurposing whole sections of the design into a new, updated piece.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tConfused by the difference between recycling and upcycling? Recycling means brands break down the materials of a product in order to construct an entirely new garment. Upcycling retains the form of the original item (it doesn’t break it down into fibres, etc), and works with whole sections of the piece to create something new. \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t Thankfully, many Australian luxury brands are harnessing the benefits of upcycling in their own collections. ESSE Studios, for example, frequently uses fabrications upcycled from deadstock. The brand’s sleek Column Dress, available at showroom-x.com, utilises upcycled material that was originally produced in excess and would have otherwise ended up as waste.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tSustainable-design pioneer, Kit Willow, requently uses upcycled fabrics in her KITX designs, telling Showroom-X “We are committed to being an example of true style for the modern global era, we simply don't believe in quality fashion that harms our planet and natural eco-systems.” (read the full feature with Willow \r\n\there).\r\n\r\n\r\n\t Unsure how to identify upcycled pieces? Give product descriptions or clothing tags a thorough read – brands are always keen to identify sustainable and ethical practices, and will highlight the use of upcycled fabrications in an obvious manner.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tShowroom-X will always identify and celebrate brands using upcycled fabrications, so if you’re unsure just reach out on email or social media and we’ll help clarify. And if you want to contribute to the upcycling process, there are plenty of places to send back your old pieces, such as Upparrel, which offers a clothing collection service.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIf you ask us, old never looked so good.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        It’s impossible to have a conversation about fashion at the moment without addressing the 500,000-tonne elephant in the room: textile waste.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-denim/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-linen/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [251, 244, 221,970]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Everything you need to know about upcycling","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/upcycling-parralax-1-image-3.jpg?t=1612417572"},"title":"Everything you need to know about upcycling","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/everything-you-need-to-know-about-upcycling/"}
Everything you need to know about upcycling

Everything you need to know about upcycling

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{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"21st Jan 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: NICOLE TRUNFIO\r\n\r\n\tBorn in Dubbo, NSW, and raised in Merredin, Western Australia, multihyphenate Nicole Trunfio recalls her childhood spent with her sprawling Italian family on their farm riding dirtbikes, go-carts and making their own wine and tomato sauce.\r\n\r\n\r\n16,608 kilometres away from her hometown, model, designer and CEO of ERTH Jewelry, Trunfio and her family now reside in Austin Texas. “It’s funny, it’s actually a very similar landscape as South Western Australia, where I spent the second part of my childhood,” she says.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            I see so much coming out of  \r\n\tAustralia.   \r\n\t these days, especially living abroad…\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nIt makes me so proud. \r\n\t\r\n\t It really inspires me and pushes me \r\n\t\r\nto be better as an entrepreneur\r\n\t\r\n\t and designer.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n“I love being around wineries and breweries, watching the process and experiencing good craftsmanship. It's always been a dream of mine to make my own wine, maybe have and live on my own winery, and put to the test the way my dad showed us how to make wine, his wine was the best. ”\r\n\r\n\r\nReflecting on her life back in Australia, Trunfio most-missed list includes a favourite swimming spot (“The North Bondi rock”), the beaches, food, relaxed way of life, Aussie humor and the fashion industry she considers family. It’s a lifestyle she would one day like to share with her three children, Zion, Gia and Ella Wolf.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“I want my kids to be able to jump off the rock in North Bondi, eat at Icebergs, explore Surry Hills in the winter and take them to the outback.”  \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t As for local bucket list locations, North-Western Australia and the Northern Territory are high on Trunfio’s dream adventure billing. “I would love to feel the history of the land and learn more about Aboriginal culture and history, that would be a real blessing and honor,” she says.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tTrunfio takes a huge amount of pride in the outpouring of creative Australian influence overseas, within industries such as fashion, architecture, furniture and design. “I see so much coming out of Australia these days, especially living abroad … It makes me so proud. It really inspires me and pushes me to be better as an entrepreneur and designer.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Born in Dubbo, NSW, and raised in Merredin, Western Australia, multihyphenate Nicole Trunfio recalls her childhood spent with her sprawling Italian family on their farm riding dirtbikes, go-carts and making their own wine and tomato sauce.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/muse-jess-gomes/\r\n        - /musings/secret-australia-the-travelista/\r\n        - /musings/secret-australia-bella-thomas/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [866, 1000, 926, 860]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: NICOLE TRUNFIO","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/41339814-767166723615429-964139949170802386-n.jpg?t=1611201403"},"title":"MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: NICOLE TRUNFIO","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/my-secret-australia-nicole-trunfio/"}
MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: NICOLE TRUNFIO

MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: NICOLE TRUNFIO

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{"author":"Jaime Carmody","date_published":"20th Jan 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Let’s talk about linen\r\n\r\n\tHere at Showroom-X, the phrase ‘summer holidays’ collectively conjures images of oceanside escapes, beach reads, an ice cold cocktail and, most importantly, our favourite linen staples.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nSynonymous with warm climate wardrobes, linen has grown to become one of the most popular and versatile fabrications in use locally. For this edition of Showroom-X Learnings, we break down the material and explore some of the biggest advantages and misconceptions surrounding linen.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            One of the \r\n\toldest textiles in the world, linen dates back to around 8000BC\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"We try to choose fabric\r\n\t\r\n\tthat's gentle on the planet.\" - SJC\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nDrawn from the flax plant, the textile itself is created through a process called ‘retting’ which assists in separating the fibres to break down the structure, allowing the material to be separated, spun and woven or knitted. On the plus side, growing flax requires a low amount of water, and there is very little waste associated with the plant, as discarded parts can be reused and repurposed to produce linseed oil or flax seeds for consumption.\r\n\r\n\r\nAnother upside of the material is the lack of harsh pesticides used when crafting organic linen meaning that, when untreated, it is fully biodegradable. It’s important to keep in mind, however, that once the material is mixed or is not organically sourced, the textile is no-longer biodegradable as it was most likely curated using pesticides and harsh chemicals to fasten the production process.\r\n\r\n\r\nA number of Australian labels harness the benefits of the versatile textile for their collections, including Jac & Jack, SIR., KITX and Sarah-Jane Clarke.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\"I find that not all linen is created equal, like many things,” says Clarke, who launched her eponymous brand in 2018. “We source our linen from Lithuania, [from] a family run factory over there … I heard that they did organic linens and I liked the fact that they were a small family-run business. I just thought that tied in quite nicely with my brand.\" \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t A personal favourite of Clarke, linen features heavily across her vacation-ready collection, rendered in sun washed shades of pink, ivory, seagrass and blue. “We try to choose fabrics that are gentle on the planet,” she says, the added bonus being “it keeps you cool; I just find it’s a really durable fabric”.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tSo how can we ensure we’re investing in sustainable linen? Clarke recommends examining the price tag. “You can normally tell on the pricing, if you’re buying something that is on the cheaper side you probably know that the linen isn’t as good quality as something that’s a little more expensive.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t Next, check the facts. Brands will indicate how the garment is dyed - veer towards natural dyes over harsh chemicals, as these are less harmful for the environment. Keep an eye out for brands that meet organic certifications and ecological and social standards, such as ESSE Studios, SIR., KITX, Bassike and Jac + Jack.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tLastly, approach your linen purchase as a timeless investment. “Depending on how it’s woven, good quality linen shouldn’t lose its shape,” says Clarke, making it a wardrobe staple for years to come.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Here at Showroom-X, the phrase ‘summer holidays’ collectively conjures images of oceanside escapes, beach reads, an ice cold cocktail and, most importantly, our favourite linen staples.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Jaime Carmody\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Jaime-Carmody.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-denim/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\n        - /musings/secret-australia-rhor-remedy/\r\n        - /musings/fashion-laureate-awards-2020/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1084, 1088, 1085, 1090]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Let’s talk about Linen","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/54800408-398074694356691-2447184046155338584-n.jpg?t=1611134562"},"title":"Let’s talk about Linen","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/lets-talk-about-linen/"}
Let’s talk about Linen

Let’s talk about Linen

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{"author":"Jaime Carmody","date_published":"13th Jan 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Let’s talk about Viscose\r\n\r\n\tTextiles are an essential part of our day-to-day lives; as personal as a fragrance, due to how close they sit to our skin. Which is why it’s becoming increasingly important to understand what materials are actually found within our wardrobes and where they have come from.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nTraditionally, the most commonly used fibres include cotton, hemp and linen, however the popularity of viscose has grown in recent years due, in part, to its broad range of functionalities.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            Australian brands, including ESSE Studios, KITX, Lee Mathews and Matteau, are paving the way by rebranding how viscose is both perceived and used within the industry.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nA semi-synthetic fibre, the material has become a favoured textile within the fashion industry as an affordable alternative to silk. Derived from the cellulose from fast growing, regenerative trees (such as eucalyptus and pine, as well as plants which include bamboo, soy and sugar cane), it is classified in some cases to be a plant-based product – though there is concern regarding how the material is manufactured when it comes to accessing the cellulose and regenerating it into a woven fabric.\r\n\r\n\r\nNumerous Australian brands, including ESSE Studios, KITX, Lee Mathews and Matteau, are paving the way by rebranding how viscose is both perceived and used within the industry.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tMatteau is another Australian label that sources FSC certified viscose, and works closely with their supply chain to trace the viscose that’s used throughout their range of subtle statement jersey pieces. Dedicated to prioritising the use of materials that are regenerative, organic, renewable and recycled, Matteau continues to pave the way for more conscious consumerism and ethically sourced fashion.  \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t Created with sustainability and transparency in mind, ESSE Studios highlights what a socially and environmentally aware brand should look like. Known for its wardrobe essentials and season-less designs, the brand sources viscose yarn that is 100 per cent Australian made and handcrafted from FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) approved sustainable forestry (meaning it is responsibly managed and ethically sourced).\r\n\r\n\r\n\tSo why use viscose? The brand’s founder and creative director, Charlotte Hicks, explains that it offers “a really nice level of performance to the fabric,” she says. “It adds a softness and a drape but also a level of durability. Ultimately, I hope which add to the longevity and performance of the garment and do my best to control the environmental impacts also.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tMatteau is another Australian label that sources FSC certified viscose, and works closely with their supply chain to trace the viscose that’s used throughout their range of subtle statement jersey pieces. Dedicated to prioritising the use of materials that are regenerative, organic, renewable and recycled, Matteau continues to pave the way for more conscious consumerism and ethically sourced fashion.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAnother example of a local Australian brand taking this leap is sustainable-design lead label KITX. Founded in 2014 by Kit Willow, the luxury brand consciously sources sustainable materials from around the globe and utilises 100 per cent viscose in a range of their garments. The fibre is certified by ‘lenzing’, a closed loop system which guarantees no toxic effluent waste damage, as the chemicals required to create the material are reclaimed and reused. Lenzing is an ecological and responsible manufacturing process as it is derived from certified renewable wood sources. These sources use up to 50 per cent lower emissions and water compared to that of generic viscose allowing the fabric to be biodegradable and recyclable.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tLike all fabrications, Hicks acknowledges there are pros and cons. “It’s really important that viscose comes in a lot of shapes and sizes and, like everything, there is better quality and poorer quality versions out there.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Producing something from nothing has impact, so really it is attempting to understand how you can make better choices,” she says. “Ultimately for me it is about … considering the impact on a few fronts - from both an environmental point of view, along each part of the supply chain of course – then secondly a performance point of view. How does it make her feel, does it function for her? Does this piece have longevity? Is it durable will it withstand her wear and last? What will happen at the end of its life cycle?”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Textiles are an essential part of our day-to-day lives; as personal as a fragrance, due to how close they sit to our skin. Which is why it’s becoming increasingly important to understand what materials are actually found within our wardrobes and where they have come from.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Jaime Carmody\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Jaime-Carmody.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-denim/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\n        - /musings/secret-australia-rhor-remedy/\r\n        - /musings/fashion-laureate-awards-2020/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [858, 808, 970, 865]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Let’s talk about Viscose","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/img-9672.jpg?t=1610529441"},"title":"Let’s talk about Viscose","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/"}
Let’s talk about Viscose

Let’s talk about Viscose

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