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MUSINGS

        
{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"13th Feb 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"KITTY CLARK\r\n\r\n\tFor founder and director of Saint Cloche gallery, Kitty Clark, her work is about so much more than just staging exhibitions – describing herself as “a producer and curator of talent and potential across many creative avenues”\r\n\r\n\r\nFor founder and director of Saint Cloche gallery, Kitty Clark, her work is about so much more than just staging exhibitions – describing herself as “a producer and curator of talent and potential across many creative avenues”. Clark launched the Paddington (Sydney) gallery six years ago, as an avenue to support emerging and mid-career artists.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"I have to have a  \r\n\tdeep connection to the work in order to want to represent them\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"It’s important to me that the \r\n\t\r\n\t artists themselves  \r\n\trealise their \r\n\t\r\n\town \r\n\tauthentic storytelling ability.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tOf the current creative landscape, Clark is invigorated by the surge of interest in artistic pursuits. “Since COVID we’ve seen a surge in people wanting to connect and seeking out great art. I think that’s because art helps inspire and heal in these difficult times,” she explains.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“People travel to other worlds voyeuristically through art even though we are having to be stuck at home. I know I do this myself.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tTell me a little about your upbringing – where you we born and raised, what your family was like? \r\n\t I was born in Malaysia and raised in a little town called Klang, close to a port … I remember Mango, Papaya and Coconut trees in the garden with chooks running around. In the mornings we would go to the local farmers markets together to buy our food. I spent a lot of hours in the kitchen watching my grandma cook and also tending to her veggie and flower garden. These are some of my most fond childhood memories.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhat drew you to the world of art? What do you love most about it? \r\nI started out wanting to be an artist and got side-tracked by the fashion industry which, back then, was far more creative, I feel. With my Asian upbringing, being an artist was probably not thought of as the best career in order to put food on the table - not that my parents discouraged it, but they worried about my being able to make a good living out of being a struggling artist.\r\n\r\n\r\nI was looking for more creative freedom and coming from the corporate world of fashion I was drawn once more into the art world, but rather than being the artist, I now produce and nurture other emerging artists and am still quite connected to fashion in that I am still inspired by that world and draw from that world. Curation and producing interesting, innovative exhibitions is my own personal art form.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAre you working on any exhibitions you can tell us about at the moment? \r\nEmily Imeson with Ancient River, River Red, which is the next show. I love her story where she decided to give up living in ‘society’ and adventures through the outback, immersing herself in traversing this great land in her trusted [Toyota] Troopy to gain a better understanding of her relationship to the land.\r\n\r\n\r\nDavid Whitworth, with his debut solo show Falling Awake which will feature a series of humble, quiet observations of moments expressed through painting a variety of special spots he frequents that he feels, give him a sense of place.\r\n\r\n\r\nFollowing her successful first solo show at Sydney Contemporary 2019, I am very excited for Evi O’s upcoming second solo show, GIANT. In this body of work, Evi investigates the light and dark sides of big matters. In physical form, natural and man-made monoliths help identify our place in the universe.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style? \r\nDay-to-day I like relaxed luxury, feeling confident and comfortable at the same time is essential. Dressing for occasions I love ‘mod’ silhouettes - fine tailoring with a nod to 60s symmetry in distinctive materials and block colours with a hint of jewellery. For work events I love wearing structured blazers (I have an obsession with blazers), with a silk tank or fine cotton tee, and a relaxed fit pant or jeans and mid-height heels to elevate the look.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWho are some of your favourite designers? \r\nInternational: Saint Laurent, Gucci, Chanel, Christopher Kane, Junya Watanabe, Francoise, Giuliva Heritage Collection, Valentino. I also love seeking out vintage luxury pieces. Australian designers: Scanlan Theodore, KitX, Matteau, Ellery, R.M. Williams.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you can’t do without? \r\nI can’t go past a relaxed fit crisp white shirt – a section of my wardrobe is dedicated to my collection of white shirts. Black Leather sandals. I don’t leave the house without sunglasses.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhat you think about the concept of ‘beauty’ in the modern age? \r\nDiversity, being natural, confident and being authentic is true beauty.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWho are your idols? \r\nDefinitely Tom Ford – he is one person I admire and why I wanted to be in fashion and aspired to, and eventually did work for Gucci. Pierre Cardin, known as ‘fashion’s architect’, his innovative designs transcended into sculpture and architecture - both of them showed such versatility as creatives which is so inspiring to me.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        For founder and director of Saint Cloche gallery, Kitty Clark, her work is about so much more than just staging exhibitions – describing herself as “a producer and curator of talent and potential across many creative avenues”\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-linen/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1033, 1038, 706,725]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"KITTY CLARK","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/saint-cloche-instagram-kitty-clarke.jpg?t=1613119748"},"title":"KITTY CLARK","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/kitty-clark/"}
KITTY CLARK

KITTY CLARK

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{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"4th Feb 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Everything you need to know about upcycling\r\n\r\n\tIt’s impossible to have a conversation about fashion at the moment without addressing the 500,000-tonne elephant in the room: textile waste.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nSynonymous with warm climate wardrobes, linen has grown to become one of the most popular and versatile fabrications in use locally. For this edition of Showroom-X Learnings, we break down the material and explore some of the biggest advantages and misconceptions surrounding linen. And that figure isn’t just plucked from the imagination – according to research published by McKinsey & Co -\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            More than \r\n\t500,000 tonnes of textiles are discarded into Australian landfillannually.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nWith production still on the rise, \r\n\t\r\n\tthere’s never been a more important time to discuss upcycling\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n “Upcycling is the practice of creating a useable product from waste or unwanted items or adapting an existing product in some way to add value. The purpose of upcycling is reducing waste and improving the efficiency of resource use” (as defined by whatis.com).\r\n\r\n\r\nIn the fashion industry, this could mean taking old, worn or stained products and repurposing whole sections of the design into a new, updated piece.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tConfused by the difference between recycling and upcycling? Recycling means brands break down the materials of a product in order to construct an entirely new garment. Upcycling retains the form of the original item (it doesn’t break it down into fibres, etc), and works with whole sections of the piece to create something new. \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t Thankfully, many Australian luxury brands are harnessing the benefits of upcycling in their own collections. ESSE Studios, for example, frequently uses fabrications upcycled from deadstock. The brand’s sleek Column Dress, available at showroom-x.com, utilises upcycled material that was originally produced in excess and would have otherwise ended up as waste.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tSustainable-design pioneer, Kit Willow, requently uses upcycled fabrics in her KITX designs, telling Showroom-X “We are committed to being an example of true style for the modern global era, we simply don't believe in quality fashion that harms our planet and natural eco-systems.” (read the full feature with Willow \r\n\there).\r\n\r\n\r\n\t Unsure how to identify upcycled pieces? Give product descriptions or clothing tags a thorough read – brands are always keen to identify sustainable and ethical practices, and will highlight the use of upcycled fabrications in an obvious manner.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tShowroom-X will always identify and celebrate brands using upcycled fabrications, so if you’re unsure just reach out on email or social media and we’ll help clarify. And if you want to contribute to the upcycling process, there are plenty of places to send back your old pieces, such as Upparrel, which offers a clothing collection service.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIf you ask us, old never looked so good.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        It’s impossible to have a conversation about fashion at the moment without addressing the 500,000-tonne elephant in the room: textile waste.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-denim/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-linen/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [251, 244, 221,970]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Everything you need to know about upcycling","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/upcycling-parralax-1-image-3.jpg?t=1612417572"},"title":"Everything you need to know about upcycling","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/everything-you-need-to-know-about-upcycling/"}
Everything you need to know about upcycling

Everything you need to know about upcycling

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{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"21st Jan 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: NICOLE TRUNFIO\r\n\r\n\tBorn in Dubbo, NSW, and raised in Merredin, Western Australia, multihyphenate Nicole Trunfio recalls her childhood spent with her sprawling Italian family on their farm riding dirtbikes, go-carts and making their own wine and tomato sauce.\r\n\r\n\r\n16,608 kilometres away from her hometown, model, designer and CEO of ERTH Jewelry, Trunfio and her family now reside in Austin Texas. “It’s funny, it’s actually a very similar landscape as South Western Australia, where I spent the second part of my childhood,” she says.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            I see so much coming out of  \r\n\tAustralia.   \r\n\t these days, especially living abroad…\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nIt makes me so proud. \r\n\t\r\n\t It really inspires me and pushes me \r\n\t\r\nto be better as an entrepreneur\r\n\t\r\n\t and designer.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n“I love being around wineries and breweries, watching the process and experiencing good craftsmanship. It's always been a dream of mine to make my own wine, maybe have and live on my own winery, and put to the test the way my dad showed us how to make wine, his wine was the best. ”\r\n\r\n\r\nReflecting on her life back in Australia, Trunfio most-missed list includes a favourite swimming spot (“The North Bondi rock”), the beaches, food, relaxed way of life, Aussie humor and the fashion industry she considers family. It’s a lifestyle she would one day like to share with her three children, Zion, Gia and Ella Wolf.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“I want my kids to be able to jump off the rock in North Bondi, eat at Icebergs, explore Surry Hills in the winter and take them to the outback.”  \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t As for local bucket list locations, North-Western Australia and the Northern Territory are high on Trunfio’s dream adventure billing. “I would love to feel the history of the land and learn more about Aboriginal culture and history, that would be a real blessing and honor,” she says.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tTrunfio takes a huge amount of pride in the outpouring of creative Australian influence overseas, within industries such as fashion, architecture, furniture and design. “I see so much coming out of Australia these days, especially living abroad … It makes me so proud. It really inspires me and pushes me to be better as an entrepreneur and designer.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Born in Dubbo, NSW, and raised in Merredin, Western Australia, multihyphenate Nicole Trunfio recalls her childhood spent with her sprawling Italian family on their farm riding dirtbikes, go-carts and making their own wine and tomato sauce.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/muse-jess-gomes/\r\n        - /musings/secret-australia-the-travelista/\r\n        - /musings/secret-australia-bella-thomas/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [866, 1000, 926, 860]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: NICOLE TRUNFIO","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/41339814-767166723615429-964139949170802386-n.jpg?t=1611201403"},"title":"MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: NICOLE TRUNFIO","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/my-secret-australia-nicole-trunfio/"}
MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: NICOLE TRUNFIO

MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: NICOLE TRUNFIO

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{"author":"Jaime Carmody","date_published":"20th Jan 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Let’s talk about linen\r\n\r\n\tHere at Showroom-X, the phrase ‘summer holidays’ collectively conjures images of oceanside escapes, beach reads, an ice cold cocktail and, most importantly, our favourite linen staples.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nSynonymous with warm climate wardrobes, linen has grown to become one of the most popular and versatile fabrications in use locally. For this edition of Showroom-X Learnings, we break down the material and explore some of the biggest advantages and misconceptions surrounding linen.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            One of the \r\n\toldest textiles in the world, linen dates back to around 8000BC\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"We try to choose fabric\r\n\t\r\n\tthat's gentle on the planet.\" - SJC\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nDrawn from the flax plant, the textile itself is created through a process called ‘retting’ which assists in separating the fibres to break down the structure, allowing the material to be separated, spun and woven or knitted. On the plus side, growing flax requires a low amount of water, and there is very little waste associated with the plant, as discarded parts can be reused and repurposed to produce linseed oil or flax seeds for consumption.\r\n\r\n\r\nAnother upside of the material is the lack of harsh pesticides used when crafting organic linen meaning that, when untreated, it is fully biodegradable. It’s important to keep in mind, however, that once the material is mixed or is not organically sourced, the textile is no-longer biodegradable as it was most likely curated using pesticides and harsh chemicals to fasten the production process.\r\n\r\n\r\nA number of Australian labels harness the benefits of the versatile textile for their collections, including Jac & Jack, SIR., KITX and Sarah-Jane Clarke.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\"I find that not all linen is created equal, like many things,” says Clarke, who launched her eponymous brand in 2018. “We source our linen from Lithuania, [from] a family run factory over there … I heard that they did organic linens and I liked the fact that they were a small family-run business. I just thought that tied in quite nicely with my brand.\" \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t A personal favourite of Clarke, linen features heavily across her vacation-ready collection, rendered in sun washed shades of pink, ivory, seagrass and blue. “We try to choose fabrics that are gentle on the planet,” she says, the added bonus being “it keeps you cool; I just find it’s a really durable fabric”.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tSo how can we ensure we’re investing in sustainable linen? Clarke recommends examining the price tag. “You can normally tell on the pricing, if you’re buying something that is on the cheaper side you probably know that the linen isn’t as good quality as something that’s a little more expensive.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t Next, check the facts. Brands will indicate how the garment is dyed - veer towards natural dyes over harsh chemicals, as these are less harmful for the environment. Keep an eye out for brands that meet organic certifications and ecological and social standards, such as ESSE Studios, SIR., KITX, Bassike and Jac + Jack.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tLastly, approach your linen purchase as a timeless investment. “Depending on how it’s woven, good quality linen shouldn’t lose its shape,” says Clarke, making it a wardrobe staple for years to come.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Here at Showroom-X, the phrase ‘summer holidays’ collectively conjures images of oceanside escapes, beach reads, an ice cold cocktail and, most importantly, our favourite linen staples.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Jaime Carmody\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Jaime-Carmody.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-denim/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\n        - /musings/secret-australia-rhor-remedy/\r\n        - /musings/fashion-laureate-awards-2020/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1084, 1088, 1085, 1090]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Let’s talk about Linen","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/54800408-398074694356691-2447184046155338584-n.jpg?t=1611134562"},"title":"Let’s talk about Linen","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/lets-talk-about-linen/"}
Let’s talk about Linen

Let’s talk about Linen

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{"author":"Jaime Carmody","date_published":"13th Jan 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Let’s talk about Viscose\r\n\r\n\tTextiles are an essential part of our day-to-day lives; as personal as a fragrance, due to how close they sit to our skin. Which is why it’s becoming increasingly important to understand what materials are actually found within our wardrobes and where they have come from.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nTraditionally, the most commonly used fibres include cotton, hemp and linen, however the popularity of viscose has grown in recent years due, in part, to its broad range of functionalities.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            Australian brands, including ESSE Studios, KITX, Lee Mathews and Matteau, are paving the way by rebranding how viscose is both perceived and used within the industry.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nA semi-synthetic fibre, the material has become a favoured textile within the fashion industry as an affordable alternative to silk. Derived from the cellulose from fast growing, regenerative trees (such as eucalyptus and pine, as well as plants which include bamboo, soy and sugar cane), it is classified in some cases to be a plant-based product – though there is concern regarding how the material is manufactured when it comes to accessing the cellulose and regenerating it into a woven fabric.\r\n\r\n\r\nNumerous Australian brands, including ESSE Studios, KITX, Lee Mathews and Matteau, are paving the way by rebranding how viscose is both perceived and used within the industry.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tMatteau is another Australian label that sources FSC certified viscose, and works closely with their supply chain to trace the viscose that’s used throughout their range of subtle statement jersey pieces. Dedicated to prioritising the use of materials that are regenerative, organic, renewable and recycled, Matteau continues to pave the way for more conscious consumerism and ethically sourced fashion.  \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t Created with sustainability and transparency in mind, ESSE Studios highlights what a socially and environmentally aware brand should look like. Known for its wardrobe essentials and season-less designs, the brand sources viscose yarn that is 100 per cent Australian made and handcrafted from FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) approved sustainable forestry (meaning it is responsibly managed and ethically sourced).\r\n\r\n\r\n\tSo why use viscose? The brand’s founder and creative director, Charlotte Hicks, explains that it offers “a really nice level of performance to the fabric,” she says. “It adds a softness and a drape but also a level of durability. Ultimately, I hope which add to the longevity and performance of the garment and do my best to control the environmental impacts also.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tMatteau is another Australian label that sources FSC certified viscose, and works closely with their supply chain to trace the viscose that’s used throughout their range of subtle statement jersey pieces. Dedicated to prioritising the use of materials that are regenerative, organic, renewable and recycled, Matteau continues to pave the way for more conscious consumerism and ethically sourced fashion.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAnother example of a local Australian brand taking this leap is sustainable-design lead label KITX. Founded in 2014 by Kit Willow, the luxury brand consciously sources sustainable materials from around the globe and utilises 100 per cent viscose in a range of their garments. The fibre is certified by ‘lenzing’, a closed loop system which guarantees no toxic effluent waste damage, as the chemicals required to create the material are reclaimed and reused. Lenzing is an ecological and responsible manufacturing process as it is derived from certified renewable wood sources. These sources use up to 50 per cent lower emissions and water compared to that of generic viscose allowing the fabric to be biodegradable and recyclable.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tLike all fabrications, Hicks acknowledges there are pros and cons. “It’s really important that viscose comes in a lot of shapes and sizes and, like everything, there is better quality and poorer quality versions out there.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Producing something from nothing has impact, so really it is attempting to understand how you can make better choices,” she says. “Ultimately for me it is about … considering the impact on a few fronts - from both an environmental point of view, along each part of the supply chain of course – then secondly a performance point of view. How does it make her feel, does it function for her? Does this piece have longevity? Is it durable will it withstand her wear and last? What will happen at the end of its life cycle?”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Textiles are an essential part of our day-to-day lives; as personal as a fragrance, due to how close they sit to our skin. Which is why it’s becoming increasingly important to understand what materials are actually found within our wardrobes and where they have come from.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Jaime Carmody\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Jaime-Carmody.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-denim/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\n        - /musings/secret-australia-rhor-remedy/\r\n        - /musings/fashion-laureate-awards-2020/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [858, 808, 970, 865]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Let’s talk about Viscose","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/img-9672.jpg?t=1610529441"},"title":"Let’s talk about Viscose","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/"}
Let’s talk about Viscose

Let’s talk about Viscose

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{"author":"Showroom-X","date_published":"23rd Nov 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"FASHION LAUREATE AWARDS 2020\r\n\r\n\tIt’s certainly an understatement to say that it’s been a particularly difficult year for the fashion industry (just as it has for all people and businesses). In response to the unfolding crises this year has brought, the 2020 Fashion Laureate Awards (sponsored by IMG and first established in 2008) has adapted its categories to better recognise the willpower and persistence of the industry leaders, designers and businesses in the wake of COVID-19.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nThis year’s award categories include Sustainable Innovation, Established Designer, Emerging Designer, The People’s Choice and 2020 Award for Change and Innovation.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            Showroom-X is thrilled to receive a nomination for the Australian Fashion Laureate’s Change and Innovation Award.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nThe nomination acknowledges “industry leaders and businesses that have shown admirable efforts to adapt and operate through the challenges faced over the last 12 months”.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWe are honoured to share this experience with some of our partnered labels and fellow nominees, including Esse Studios, KITX and Bassike. \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tESSE Studios Founded in 2017, Charlotte Hicks launched ESSE Studios with a dream to craft timeless, considered wardrobe staples while also combating the volume of waste produced by the fashion industry each year. Beloved for its slow-release, capsule collections, each design is intended to be worn beyond its release season, and is constructed from high quality materials such as Italian cotton and high quality yarn. The cult favourite ready-to-wear label is nominated for the Best Emerging Designer award.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tKITX Since its conception, KITX’s creative director, Kit Willow, has built her collections around the ethos of “planet over profit”. The sustainability-driven label provides women with ready-to-wear pieces that aim to minimise fashion’s impact on the planet and its natural resources. KITX is nominated for the Best Established Designer award, which celebrates designers for their innovation and practice within the sustainability sector.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tBassike \r\nFounded in 2006 with high-end design and sustainable manufacturing at front of mind, the Bassike philosophy rings clear throughout the brand’s range of organic cotton jersey separates and luxurious wardrobe essentials. Bassike is nominated alongside KITX for the Best Established Designer award.\r\n\r\n\r\nThe awards follow a year of intensive growth and development for Showroom-X. In addition to our Australian launch in August, CEO and co-founder Richard Paulson was invited by Business of Fashion’s Imran Amed to participate in a digital global Retail Roundtable platform. The online conversation continues fortnightly in conjunction with the Australian Fashion Council. Paulson has also been invited to speak as speaker at the upcoming international Fashion Futurum Forum, exploring the topic “What is the future of fashion independent brands in post-COVID reality?”, and will be livestreamed on leading Russian and international media and social media platforms.\r\n\r\n\r\nOver 30 industry veterans including media, buyers, communications professionals, brands, executives and designers will decide the winners of the 2020 Australian Fashion Laureate, announced to the public on December 1. The awards hope to bring unity to the industry and a sense of optimism and prosperity as the year draws to a close.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        It’s certainly an understatement to say that it’s been a particularly difficult year for the fashion industry (just as it has for all people and businesses). In response to the unfolding crises this year has brought, the 2020 Fashion Laureate Awards (sponsored by IMG and first established in 2008) has adapted its categories to better recognise the willpower and persistence of the industry leaders, designers and businesses in the wake of COVID-19.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Showroom-X\r\n    image: /product_images/import/L-parallax-3-image-9.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [376, 377, 381, 382]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"FASHION LAUREATE AWARDS 2020","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/img-8287.jpg?t=1606124855"},"title":"FASHION LAUREATE AWARDS 2020","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/fashion-laureate-awards-2020/"}
FASHION LAUREATE AWARDS 2020

FASHION LAUREATE AWARDS 2020

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{"author":"Jaime Carmody","date_published":"13th Nov 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Secret Australia: Rohr Remedy\r\n\r\n\tBased in the Far North Queensland’s city of Cairns, Emily Rohr credits her father, a dermatologist, for cementing her love of both skincare and art. “We would get so many free products from the different conferences, and would always have dermatology magazines lying around the house,” Rorh recalls. “I think all those wonderful close up microscopic images of skin also lay the foundations for my love of abstract art.”\r\n\r\n\r\nIn another circumstance of worlds colliding, an incident involving mixing raw cadmium powders for paint spurred her journey of discovery into the wellness industry. “Conventional Western medicine is great, don’t get me wrong. If I have a gunshot wound or some very serious illness it is fantastic. But for everyday use of things, especially when we are not sick, I think it is crazy to use harsh chemicals when the natural world provides so much,” Rohr explains. “This is one of the many reasons why I wanted a really clean skincare that actually had benefits, and contained significant natural activities.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            “For us, Indigenous culture is not \r\n\t‘other’.   \r\n\t It is our \r\n\tfamily and friends, it is embedded in our lives ...”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nRohr’s daily experiences with local Indigenous Australians was another motivator for launching the brand. “Every day we would sit in the [art] studio and the ladies would worry about their grandchildren and loss of culture, in the same way my parents and grandparents would lament that none of us go to mass or do certain things”.\r\n\r\n\r\nInspired by her surroundings and a desire to formulate clean, plant-based skincare, Rohr developed her own eponymous range that harnessed the teachings of Australian Indigenous cultures. Rohr Remedy’s key point of difference is its blend of native ingredients commonly found in bush medicines. With past experience and training in cultural practices, Rohr ensures that respect for Indigenous Australian cultures pervades all the brand’s products. “For us, Indigenous culture is not ‘other’. It is our family and friends, it is embedded in our lives ...”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“We actually live and come from regional Australia, so these plants are everyday and very much part of our lives; they are not exotic to us,” she says. “We also are not doing it as just an empty marketing exercise. For us, the percentage of the raw is absolutely crucial.”  \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t The Australian landscape plays such a large role in Rohr’s professional and personal experience, though there’s one part of the country that never ceases to inspire her. “I adore the desert,” she says. “Australian deserts are some of the oldest in the world, so actually have a lot of vegetation, they are not denuded sand dunes. In the desert I am always reminded of how insignificant I am, so it is very humbling, but equally I realise how precious every bit of life is, I guess the harshness of the desert always reminds us of the fragility of being alive.” Driving across Australia and taking a different road each time is something Rohr and her family engage in yearly.  “I love camping and the simplicity of being out of range. For some people this is not such a good or joyous thing but for me it is either desert or ocean that clears my head and gives me stillness.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAs for what’s next on her travel bucket list? “I am actually very keen to get to the South Coast of NSW. We have lots of friends who have moved there and it is such a beautiful part of the world. This is more because we haven’t been there for many years and believe it is time to go. Also Kangaroo Island, all these places were badly affected by fires, so I really know that they need our support (although I would go anyway, but I love that I can throw that in as a shout out for my mates towns). I also really want to go to Wilson’s Prom in Victoria again. I just need a Southern cool air hit.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Based in the Far North Queensland’s city of Cairns, Emily Rohr credits her father, a dermatologist, for cementing her love of both skincare and art. “We would get so many free products from the different conferences, and would always have dermatology magazines lying around the house,” Rorh recalls. “I think all those wonderful close up microscopic images of skin also lay the foundations for my love of abstract art.”\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Jaime Carmody\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Jaime-Carmody.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/muse-jess-gomes/\r\n        - /musings/secret-australia-the-travelista/\r\n        - /musings/secret-australia-bella-thomas/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [787, 238, 237, 231]","tags":[{"name":"Postcards","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Postcards"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Secret Australia: Rhor Remedy","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/rohrremedy-botanicals-7.jpg?t=1605239853"},"title":"Secret Australia: Rhor Remedy","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/secret-australia-rhor-remedy/"}
Secret Australia: Rhor Remedy

Secret Australia: Rhor Remedy

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{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"2nd Nov 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Muse: Jess Gomes\r\n\r\n\tModel, actor and beauty entrepreneur Jessica Gomes has been based in the USA for the past 15 years (calling Los Angeles home for eight), but her heart is still very much in her hometown of Perth, Western Australia.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n“I miss my family. I miss the simple things like going to Mum's house for a home-cooked meal or being able to walk down the street to my sister's house. Western Australia does remind me of California in a way, the landscape and the blue skies,” says Gomes over the phone from her home in LA. “When I was growing up it felt like the most isolated place in the world but now, more than ever, it's feels like one of the most sacred places in the world that you could be in.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t “I say this to a lot of young models:  \r\n\t You have a strong sense of self.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t  “I didn't fit in a box\r\n\t and thats OK\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nGomes’s father is Portuguese and her mother Singaporean-Chinese, giving the model her otherworldly beauty that has seen her career on a steep trajectory since she left home at 17 to chase an international career in modelling.\r\n\r\n\r\nIn those early days in the Big Apple, when she was working with global fashion brands and shooting editorials with Harper’s BAZAAR, Vogue and Glamour, she lived with fellow Perth model and fashion darling, Gemma Ward. Kindred spirits, you were more likely to find the pair at home reading on a Saturday evening than in a hot new nightclub.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Gemma was always somebody that I looked up to, and when we first moved to New York we would sit around and she would she tell me about books she had read, books that I hadn't even heard of. We talked about film and things other than modelling. I feel lucky that I got to grow up with an incredibly unique and intelligent woman.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t “I just worked so much in those formative years – first leaving Perth to go to work in Asia, then to New York. And I always had this thing – that because I didn't go to university I needed to make up for it. So, I was always reading a lot and looking up words in the dictionary. I was trying to educate myself because I was meeting all these highly educated people and incredibly talented writers. It was the circle we were moving in. It was definitely the days before social media, even before the whole celebrity thing.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tGomes says she is still a homebody these days, which made it easy to adapt to the chilled-out LA lifestyle. She’s adopted the West Coast uniform of flowing sundresses, jumpsuits, jeans and t-shirts and flats, and she meditates, hikes in the Hollywood Hills and keeps her cupboard well stocked with multi-vitamins and fresh organic food. That incredible skin is thanks to her skincare brand Equal Beauty, of which she is CEO, and the Beauty Chef’s Glow.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“And I get my sleep these days,” she says. “I'm pretty boring!” After a career like hers, well, a bit of boring sounds more than deserved.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Model, actor and beauty entrepreneur Jessica Gomes has been based in the USA for the past 15 years (calling Los Angeles home for eight), but her heart is still very much in her hometown of Perth, Western Australia.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Kellie Hush\r\n    image: /product_images/import/kellie-hush.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [878, 864, 859, 868]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Muse: Jess Gomes","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/jg-parallax-3-image-10.jpg?t=1604299792"},"title":"Muse: Jess Gomes","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/muse-jess-gomes/"}
Muse: Jess Gomes

Muse: Jess Gomes

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{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"29th Oct 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Let's Talk About Denim\r\n\r\n\tHigh-waisted, low slung, boot cut, skinny, flared and wide-leg – the subject of a million songs, films, frantic change-room text messages and marketing campaigns. Classics for a reason, for this Showroom-X Learnings report we’re talking about: denim.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nSociety has had a love affair with denim since the 1800s – that’s not a mistake. Yet despite its prevalence in our wardrobes (how many of us own more than one pair of jeans?), it’s only in recent years we’ve worked to understand the detrimental impacts that denim production has on our environment.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"We are empowering brands \r\n\t that use responsible behaviours to reduce their impact through radical transparency\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nLet’s start with the textile itself: denim is a type of sturdy cotton twill. Cotton grows in full sunlight and takes an average of 140 days to grow – from seed to ready-to-be-picked. After the cotton is harvested it goes through the ‘ginning’ process – where it is processed by machines to separate fibres from seeds, and the fibres are turned into thread.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nDenim is then created from weaving horizontal threads and vertical threads together. Some threads are dyed, some are left white. Using sharp scissors cutting over a pattern, the denim is cut into pieces. It’s then fashioned into garments, by skilled workers or machines, using various stitches.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhen we pull on our favourite pair of denim jeans each day, it’s unlikely we’re also considering the volume of water that is used to make them – but we should. \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t It is estimated that producing a pair of jeans consumes around 2900L of water, and large amounts of chemicals and energy.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAlso disheartening are the environmental ramifications of the dyeing process. Indigo dye is a common colourant used to shade textiles, paper, leather, and plastic. Unfortunately, textile effluents containing indigo dye (and other dye types) make water toxic and harmful for human and animal consumption, which causes an imbalance in different aquatic ecosystem food chains the world over.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAnd then there is the waste. A study published by IntechOpen (Understanding Denim Recycling: A Quantitative Study with Lifecycle Assessment Methodology), estimated that around “65 billion tons of raw materials were processed by the industrial system at the end of the first decade of the twenty-first century, and this quantity is expected to reach about 82 billion tons by the end of 2020.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tLuckily, many denim manufacturers and fashion labels have made sustainably sourced and processed denim a priority in their collections, embracing greener methods and working to educate their customers on the true financial and environmental cost of the textile. Businesses like FibreTrace – a tech company that uses patented technology to trace cotton fibres at every step of the supply chain – are realising a vision for a more transparent, ethical and sustainable denim industry. “We are empowering brands that use responsible behaviours to reduce their impact through radical transparency,” explains FibreTrace’s Director, Danielle Statham.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“It’s completely available in real time for any brand to log in and know exactly where their product is within the supply chain,” she says. “Right through to when a consumer purchases a product, the consumer will be able to be given that information by the marketing department of the brand, and the brand will be able to deliver all of that information through to the consumer and give them that compelling story. It’s like a passport.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tShowroom-X values information and transparency; we believe you should know where your garments (and their materials) come from and the true cost they have on the Earth. So next time you pull out your favourite pair of denim, consider their origin and love them the way they deserve to be loved. Each piece that enters your wardrobe should have a place of purpose and love.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tTo read more about sustainably-lead design, see our interview with KITX Creative Director, Kit Willow, or shop ESSE Studios’s sustainable denim jeans below.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        When we pull on our favourite pair of denim jeans each day, it’s unlikely we’re also considering the volume of water that is used to make them – but we should. It is estimated that producing a pair of jeans consumes around 2900L of water, and large amounts of chemicals and energy.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\n        - /musings/secret-australia-the-travelista/\r\n        - /musings/tactile-love/\r\n        - /musings/musings/art-of-the-land/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [221, 442, 776, 825]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"LET’S TALK ABOUT DENIM","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/esse-studio-jeans.jpg?t=1603959496"},"title":"LET’S TALK ABOUT DENIM","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/lets-talk-about-denim/"}
LET’S TALK ABOUT DENIM

LET’S TALK ABOUT DENIM

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{"author":"Jaime Carmody","date_published":"23rd Oct 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"SECRET AUSTRALIA: THE TRAVELISTA\r\n\r\n\tBased in Sydney’s East, Giuliana DeFelice has always admired the simplicity and effortlessness of her grandmother’s beauty routine. “Nonna used a very light almond oil with a little orange blossom water on her skin, that’s all.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nBut it was a historic monastery next to her family home in Tuscany that inspired DeFelice to launch her own beauty brand, The Travelista. “Gaining rare access to the apothecary botanical library revealed the moisturising secrets of natural remedies used in Italy since medieval times.” This sparked the idea for the first botanical formula, and five years after returning home to Sydney, The Travelista launched its luxurious range of specially formulated hydrating products to the beauty market.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t “The joy of travel and the freedom in escape.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t  Pared-back  \r\n\t beauty rituals ”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nWith ‘effortless beauty travel’ at the heart of the brand, and an emphasis on creating less wastage, the goal was simple: to create a series of pared-back beauty rituals without too many steps. Specifically formulated for the “beauty traveller”, DeFelice centred the brand around the ideology that The Travelista (the woman) should be outside enjoying her day rather than in the bathroom applying products to her skin. “It’s about sharing the whole experience, the joy of travel and the freedom in escape”. This ethos permeates the range, with each product taking into consideration how it feels, what it smells like and how it is visually identified. “We wanted to capture that feeling of waking up somewhere new … through a considered collection that gives you supple glowing skin, everyday”.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nIn terms of inspiration, DeFelice credits “the scent of sunshine and endless days'' as constants, and fills her afternoons and weekends by exploring Australia’s coastline and famous beaches such as Bondi, Gordon's Bay and Avalon. “Lately, I’ve been exploring the little beaches around Parsley Bay. There’s something about a rock with a ladder into the water, an invitation to discover yet another secret swimming spot. I love the scent of sunshine and salt, It’s the scent of endless days and captures the magic of pure escape.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“The cleansing calm of the salt air, waking up by the ocean and to be the first on the beach is incredible”. \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIn awe of the water’s horizon, next on DeFelice’s Australian bucket list is a trip to the Hinterland. “It is meditative, for me, paradoxically, it’s in the travelling that I really appreciate the beauty of stillness”.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWith the warmer months approaching, DeFelice recommends boosting hydration both inside and out with B1 and C Vitamins and using “skin identical” botanicals. ”Coming into the summer months, our skin requires extra nourishment and hydration”.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“We expose our skin to the elements more than we realise and skincare rituals that are kind to the skin (ie: skin-compatible - without irritating additives) absorb more effectively and work at a deeper level for cell repair, renewal and to strengthen the skin’s barrier function.”\r\nAlongside a healthy skincare routine, she also recommends engaging in self-care rituals such as body brushing.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Based in Sydney’s East, Giuliana DeFelice has always admired the simplicity and effortlessness of her grandmother’s beauty routine. “Nonna used a very light almond oil with a little orange blossom water on her skin, that’s all.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Jaime Carmody\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Jaime-Carmody.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [618, 616, 620, 870]","tags":[{"name":"Postcards","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Postcards"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"SECRET AUSTRALIA: THE TRAVELISTA","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/tt-parallax-1-image-2.jpg?t=1603431881"},"title":"SECRET AUSTRALIA: THE TRAVELISTA","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/secret-australia-the-travelista/"}
SECRET AUSTRALIA: THE TRAVELISTA

SECRET AUSTRALIA: THE TRAVELISTA

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{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"14th Oct 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"REGENERATIVE FASHION WITH KITX\r\n\r\n\t\"The greatest challenge is the purity of designing for the planet before profit.\"\r\n\r\n\r\nEach designer, whether helming a large Maison or the sole operator of their own brand, has a set of self-imposed design codes they abide by. Trends come and go, of course, but these codes speak more to the DNA of the brand – whether it be tailoring, occasion wear or craftsmanship, etc.\r\n\r\n\r\nFor KITX founder and creative director, Kit Willow, her brand’s DNA is intrinsically tied to the preservation of the earth. “Every decision I make is the planet before profit,” she explains on the phone during our interview. “Therefore it is a big investment for the planet, and you don’t make as much money, that is probably the biggest challenge.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t “Every decision I make is \r\n\tplanet before profit”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nLaunched in 2015, Willow’s ethos was clear: build a women’s ready-to-wear label that not only celebrated beauty but was sustainably driven. The KITX website even features a dedicated ‘Our Promise’ section, detailing “KITX promises to be at the forefront of sustainable designer fashion globally, by consciously sourcing every material and component. This ethos goes into every design we create to minimise the impact on our planet’s natural precious resources.\r\n\r\n\r\nIn the debut feature for Showroom-X’s Learnings platform, we spoke to Willow about all things sustainability, regeneration and working with waste.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“We are committed to being an example of true style for the modern global era, we simply don't believe in quality fashion that harms our planet and natural eco-systems.”\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow do you define sustainability in fashion?\r\nSo there is sustaining the current status quo and there is regenerating, which is what we are in right now. I almost feel like sustainability is now backwards because we not only need to sustain, we need to regenerate. We need to regenerate marine litter, regenerate waste, regenerate soil, and regenerate clean water … Thirty, 40 years ago we could focus on sustaining, but we are past that now. So I feel like it is more about regeneration now. The more I have learnt, the more I know that the impact we are having and what we are doing is actually more about regenerating. How we do that is through conscious sourcing. The impact fashion has comes from the materials sourced.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow do you personally go about sourcing your fabrics?\r\nWhen I look at materials … I have three pillars of sustainability I will only order from. They include, organic in the agricultural process; natural in that they are either silk, cotton, linen or hemp; and that they are upcycled and do not come from waste, or they have come from discarded nylon, polyester, or they have been passed down and are hand woven.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tConsciously sourcing materials can minimise the impact on the planet without compromising the style and design of the product. In that, there is a sustaining practice but also moving into the future with a more regenerative practice.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat are some other challenges that arise for a sustainable design-led brand? \r\nThe greatest challenge is the purity of designing for the planet before profit. Every decision I make is, the planet before profit and therefore it is a big investment for the planet and you don’t make as much money, that is probably the biggest challenge.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow difficult do you think it is to educate customers about shopping in this more conscious manner?\r\nIt has [had] an enormous uptake since I’ve launched KITX, so that’s been really great. I don’t criticise designers, but at least there are more people talking about it and they are feeling a rush about it, so that has created more awareness for the customers, which is a really good thing.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tFor me, it is always about the product as well, being able to stand on its own two feet and design beautifully and fit beautifully, that at the end of the day is going to sell the right product not the sustainability credential, that is the bonus.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you find it is hard to keep yourself accountable with that principle that you have made for yourself?\r\nAlways! I have that situation all the time. Locally sourced versus easy, or cheaper fabric versus organic cotton at $2.50 a metre. What do I choose? The organic cotton at $2.50 a metre because I know that it will break back down into earth, I know that no chemicals have been used in the agricultural process. There are also some beautiful fabrics that have polyester and nylon in them which I won’t do, so it is a constant battle.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat does it mean to be circular in the context of fashion?\r\nI think circularity is absolutely key, but at the same time circulatory is also about end life. So, what I was saying about discarding denim and then reusing it, that is circular but also regenerative. You can have circular, with a farming practice that maybe isn’t regenerative if you are reusing its end life. Which is important, but the key is that 70 percent of the materials we are using [are] sourced to have the greatest impact on the planet’s resources, which creates pollution. That is the component that has to be nailed before working out how to circulate end use as well.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tSo it is at the origin of the fabric?\r\nIYes, we are so far from getting that right as an industry. It is so great to think ahead and think circularly, but at the same time, lets’ really understand the key to sourcing to have a minimum impact.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is on the horizon for the immediate future of KitX? What is your priority at the moment and your major focus for making the brand as planet friendly as possible? \r\nIt is more about being innovative than anything else. Working more with waste – I am really interested in that – and starting to move more into regenerative circulatory.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIt’s thinking about the impact of everything that we have. Where has it come from? What impact did it have when it was created? I suppose that is the idea of circularity too and then what will happen with it when you discard it? Where will it go?\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n<\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        In the debut feature for Showroom-X’s 'Learnings' platform, we spoke with KITX founder, Kit Willow, about all things sustainability, regeneration and working with waste.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [841, 831, 675, 614]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"REGENERATIVE FASHION WITH KITX","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/single-tier-harness-front.jpg?t=1602660475"},"title":"REGENERATIVE FASHION WITH KITX","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/"}
REGENERATIVE FASHION WITH KITX

REGENERATIVE FASHION WITH KITX

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{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"16th Sep 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: BELLA THOMAS\r\n\r\n\tIn the second of our \r\n\tMy Secret Australia series, model-artist-photographer Bella Thomas talks effortless beauty and secret hiking trails.\r\n\r\n\r\nAsk Bella Thomas what she does for a living and her answer will likely change depending on the day. “I would describe myself as some kind of artist,” she says. “Some weeks I’m modelling full time, some days I find myself taking photos, creating with clay or have my head deep in photoshop. I don’t like to box myself in, makes me anxious,” she laughs.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\nBorn and raised by the Sydney shoreline, Thomas grew up with sandy feet and hot salted chips at sunset. “The beauty in simplicity is what I cherish and find most special.” This sense of simplicity in her surrounding environments imbues much of her creative output. “I don’t like to over complicate anything. When I have a project to do I come up with ideas and then keep peeling it back, aiming to always show beauty in the most effortless way,” she reflects. “True beauty is effortless, just like the Australian landscape.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t “Our world, in particular Australia, is so magnificent.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t  “True beauty is\r\n\t effortless”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nThomas’s perception of success, and the industry, reflects her laid-back, intuitive spirit. “Being part of the fashion industry, and coming from how I was raised, I am realising more and more [how] much I need ‘simple’.”\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\nWhen in search of creative inspiration, she turns her gaze to the NSW coastline (“The south coast of NSW has me in awe every time I take the drive down. I love the people and the landscape”), but it’s the WA shoreline that holds a special place in her heart.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“A few years ago I went to Perth for a job. We drove eight hours from the airport to Esperance, and then another three hours by boat to this natural pink lake on an island. It was so surreal.”\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tThough she holds her secret hideaways close to her chest, she is happy to share her new favourite hiking trail. “One new hiking spot I’ve recently come across is a gem, it’s up in the Bouddi National Park. I think you start at Putty Beach … it’s pretty!” As for where Thomas dreams of exploring next? “I’d love to explore Tasmania more, have heard there is so much beauty to see!”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        In the second of our My Secret Australia series, model-artist-photographer Bella Thomas talks effortless beauty and secret hiking trails.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [497, 295, 217, 743]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Secret Australia: BELLA THOMAS","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/parallax-1-image-3.jpg?t=1600243864"},"title":"Secret Australia: BELLA THOMAS","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/secret-australia-bella-thomas/"}
Secret Australia: BELLA THOMAS

Secret Australia: BELLA THOMAS

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