null
{"author":"Sally Paton","body":"<h1>Young Blood</h1>\r\n<p style=\"color: #333333;\">\r\n\tFor the newest injection into our Art Annex, we have gathered four of Australia’s up and coming artists to discuss their works, daily pleasures and the places they’re finding inspiration. While talking with these young Australians, each spoke to an undercurrent of intensified creative energy and collaboration in our country. One of the by-products of this challenging period in history has been a collective craving for art and beauty in the home, and these artists are answering the call. \r\n\t<strong>Saxon Quinn</strong>, <strong>Giorgia Bel</strong>, <strong>Milly Dent</strong>, and <strong>Giorgia McRae</strong> all spoke of increased time spent idly, with room to explore ideas and expand their perspectives. It was Einstein who said, “The monotony and solitude of a quiet life stimulates the creative mind.” The current landscape of our country has our artists from Saint Cloche finding beauty in the everyday; long walks, plants poking between concrete, bubblegum littered footpaths, and resoundingly, music.\r\n</p>\r\n<section class=\"blog-parallax-1\"><section class=\"photo-1\">\r\n<img src=\"/product_images/import/Collective-PARALLAX-1-ASSET-1.jpg\">\r\n</section><section class=\"photo-2\">\r\n<img src=\"/product_images/import/Collective-PARALLAX-1-ASSET-2.jpg\">\r\n<p style=\"color: #333333;\" class=\"text\">\r\n            Each artist embraces the      \r\n\t<strong>tactile nature of their practice</strong>\r\n</p>\r\n</section><section class=\"photo-3\">\r\n<p style=\"color: #333333;\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<em>Finding beauty</em>\r\n\t<br>\r\n\tin the\r\n\t<br>\r\n\t everyday\r\n</p>\r\n<p>\r\n\t<img src=\"/product_images/import/Collective-PARALLAX-1-ASSET-3.jpg\">\r\n</p>\r\n</section><section class=\"photo-4\">\r\n<p>\r\n\t<img src=\"/product_images/import/Collective-PARALLAX-1-ASSET-4.jpg\">\r\n</p>\r\n</section></section><section class=\"blog-parallax-2\">\r\n<img src=\"/product_images/import/Collective-PARALLAX-2-ASSET-5.jpg\" class=\"photo-1\">\r\n<br>\r\n<strong>What do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?</strong> <br>\r\n<strong>Saxon Quinn:</strong> Music. I’ve been getting into some older stuff lately. I find music a great way to get the balance of works created, working with negative space and the positioning of details.\r\n<br>\r\n<strong>Giorgia Bel:</strong> I can’t think of a time when I haven’t had music on. Softly or loudly, it’s there. \r\n<br>\r\n<strong>Milly Dent:</strong>\r\nA clean space, the right tools, some music and a clear mind.\r\n<br>\r\n<strong>Giorgia McRae:</strong>\r\nI need my studio to be clear… or at least not chaotic.<br>\r\n<p>\r\n\t<br>\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><u>SAXON QUINN</u></strong> <br>\r\n\t Saxon is an emerging artist from Melbourne. Each one of Saxon’s works created for Showroom-X tie into his signature aesthetics - the use of cement, strays and texture. These elements tie together with the calming use of balance and placement. The ‘Fall Apart Together’ series explores the idea of finding strength in each other's weaknesses. Saxon’s work takes a cue from the asphalt sprawl streetscapes of our cities.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"font-weight: bold;\">\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\n\tHow would you best describe your art practice?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nAbstract, brutalist, wabi-sabi. Much of my art is focused around being within the urban landscape – in particular, the cement material of our concrete jungles. Works represent the scarred, coarse-aggregate pavements, and walls found throughout cities and towns;  from children scribbling in chalk on suburban bitumen streets to tagged walls and bubblegum littered footpaths downtown.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\n\tWhat drew you to this practice? Did you always want to be an artist?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nMy mother is an artist and works with texture in a lot of her work. I grew up surrounded by art and always knew that I would end up creating works in some medium.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it? \r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nI love the fact that it allows me to escape and reset. I’m generally quite anxious and always on the go, but when I paint, I am able to relax and focus on painting alone.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\n\tWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape? Do you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nI like the fact that creatives from all walks of life can get together and collaborate on projects. I’ve found that local artists have been very approachable when it comes to sharing knowledge and experiences.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\n\tWho are your idols?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nMum. She has a neverending positive attitude and is always sharing down knowledge. She’s the life of the party. People blossom around her.\r\n</p>\r\n<p>\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\n\t<u>\r\n\tGIORGIA BEL\r\n\t</u></strong> <br>\r\nGiorgia Bel is a self-taught artist who predominantly works with acrylic and oil-based paint. She began playing with paint and sketch five years ago, aspiring to simply create beauty from a darker place of ill health & recovery. Giorgia uses colour and texture to create depth in her works which focus on imagined and seen landscapes, undersea-scapes and the human form.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\n\tHow would you best describe your art practice?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nMy art practice is my medicine, my meditation. I go, I wander in my mind, and I begin. The practice is not careful, my hand is free, and I sketch rough lines and start to fill in; colours over colours, layering, in textured strokes. It’s not a formal practice that I have learnt. It’s just exactly what I feel.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\n\tWhat drew you to this practice? Did you always want to be an artist?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nI wanted to be a designer or an architect. I studied this but fell ill in my early twenties, putting a halt to my first years of working. My doctor told me to paint to help still my mind. I couldn’t do much at the time, so I took the advice and picked up a brush. I didn’t like it much at first, but I found rest in it. Ultimately it helped me heal. It is a great love of my life.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\n\tWhat do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nI am lucky enough to be in a studio that is surrounded by plants. I walk through the alley often when taking a break to stretch. This is really stimulating.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\n\tWhat or who is currently inspiring your world?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nI’m taking long walks being in lockdown. Using my camera to capture specks of colour I see in the path or a flower that stands out. The rocks and crashing water at the beach. There is so much to stimulate your mind as you step out of the house.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\n\t<u>\r\n\tMILLY DENT\r\n\t</u></strong> <br>\r\nMilly Dent is a Sydney based ceramic artist. Milly reimagines everyday routines through uniquely handcrafted, exclusive ceramic works, underlied with the philosophy of creating pieces that are both utilitarian and sculptural. In her body of work for Showroom X, Milly uses white porcelain stained with black pigments to create a statement series of wares which fire to a beautiful black graphite colour, a wonderful contrast to any white space in which they sit.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\n\tHow would you best describe your art practice?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nMy evolving collections are a continued study of the intimate, tangible and ever-challenging nature of porcelain. Learning from its history as well as new processes to create innovative, interesting work.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it? \r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nThere is something so rewarding about crafting an object from essentially nothing with your hands. Porcelain has many wonderful qualities that draw me in, including the whiteness, the translucency and the vitrified-stoney feel once fired, as well as the soft, malleable, gentle feel of the unfired material.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\nAre there any Australian designers you love?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nYes! Lots! Clever friends such as Evi O, Pip Stent, Tara Burke and Claire Johnson.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\nWho are your idols?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nMy creative friends!\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\nWhat or who is currently inspiring your world?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nThe ocean. It’s refreshing, humbling and best of all, inspiring.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"font-weight: bold;\">\r\n\t<strong></strong>\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"font-weight: bold; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong><br>\r\n\t<u>\r\n\tGIORGIA MCRAE\r\n\t</u></strong>\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\">\r\n\t</strong>\r\n\tGiorgia McRae is a multi-disciplinary artist based in Sydney. The series of drawings she has created for Showroom-X is an ode to balance and weight, and how we need both to keep grounded in our daily lives. She explores both sculpture and drawing and has created a playful relationship between the two mediums. There is a nod to yin and yang in her work, and the beauty in simplicity, which is ever present in these pastels.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\nHow would you best describe your art practice?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nI like to think that my work is part abstract, modernist, and cubist plus a little Art Deco and a little Bauhaus – I’m maybe a little greedy with that mouthful. My process is intuitive, so each line, shape, and colour will influence the next. I don’t think I’ve ever known how one of my pieces was going to turn out - which is sometimes a blessing and sometimes a curse depending on the end result.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\nWhat drew you to this practice? Did you always want to be an artist?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nStrangely enough, I always thought that I’d be a ceramicist – But almost straight away, drawing took on a life of its own. The ‘drawn’ sculptures were impossible, without bases, just floating in space.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\nWhat do you enjoy about it? \r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nSo many things! But if I had to pick one, it would have to be creating a composition that works. It’s always such a wonderful moment when you feel your mind go ‘yup, that’s enough, that’s finished.’ Or even the feeling of being on the clear road to that feeling.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\nWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape? Do you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nIt feels like there’s a nice little hum of excitement and creativity in the air – maybe because we’ve been in and out of lockdowns and people are spending money on things that will make their houses feel beautiful instead of on travel? If I’m completely honest, I’ve also quite enjoyed being able to lock myself away in my studio during the latest lockdown. It will be so nice to see what we’ve all been working on when this is all over.\r\n</p>\r\n<p style=\"color: rgb(51, 51, 51);\" class=\"text\">\r\n\t<strong style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><br>\r\nWhat or who is currently inspiring your world?\r\n\t</strong> <br>\r\nOh gosh, so many artists. Le Corbusier, Joan Miro, Helen Frankenthaler, Alexander Calder, Mark Rothko, Jean-Michel Basquiat – the list could go on forever.\r\n</p>\r\n<section class=\"blog-parallax-3\" style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><em><strong><em><strong>\r\n<img src=\"/product_images/import/Collective-PARALLAX-3-ASSET-7.jpg\" class=\"photo-1\">\r\n<img src=\"/product_images/import/Collective-PARALLAX-3-ASSET-8.jpg\" class=\"photo-2\">\r\n<img src=\"/product_images/import/Collective-PARALLAX-3-ASSET-9.jpg\" class=\"photo-3\">\r\n<img src=\"/product_images/import/Collective-PARALLAX-3-ASSET-10.jpg\" class=\"photo-4\">\r\n</strong></em></strong></em></section><em style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><strong><em><strong><br>\r\n<pre class=\"x-field x-format:yaml\" style=\"margin-top: 100px\">\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        For the newest injection into our Art Annex, we have gathered four of Australia’s up and coming artists to discuss their works, daily pleasures and the places they’re finding inspiration. While talking with these young Australians, each spoke to an undercurrent of intensified creative energy and collaboration in our country.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1701, 1702, 1703, 1700,1705,1706,1707]\r\n</pre>\r\n</strong></em></strong></em>\r\n<p>\r\n\t<em style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><strong><em><strong></strong></em></strong></em>\r\n</p>\r\n<p>\r\n\t<em style=\"font-weight: bold;\"><strong><em><strong></strong></em></strong></em>\r\n</p>\r\n</section>","date_published":"27th Aug 2021","tags":[{"name":"portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Artist In Residence - The Collective","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/artist-in-residence-collective-banner.jpg?t=1630044451"},"title":"Artist In Residence - The Collective","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/artist-in-residence-the-collective/"}

Young Blood

For the newest injection into our Art Annex, we have gathered four of Australia’s up and coming artists to discuss their works, daily pleasures and the places they’re finding inspiration. While talking with these young Australians, each spoke to an undercurrent of intensified creative energy and collaboration in our country. One of the by-products of this challenging period in history has been a collective craving for art and beauty in the home, and these artists are answering the call. Saxon Quinn, Giorgia Bel, Milly Dent, and Giorgia McRae all spoke of increased time spent idly, with room to explore ideas and expand their perspectives. It was Einstein who said, “The monotony and solitude of a quiet life stimulates the creative mind.” The current landscape of our country has our artists from Saint Cloche finding beauty in the everyday; long walks, plants poking between concrete, bubblegum littered footpaths, and resoundingly, music.

Each artist embraces the tactile nature of their practice

Finding beauty
in the
everyday


What do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?
Saxon Quinn: Music. I’ve been getting into some older stuff lately. I find music a great way to get the balance of works created, working with negative space and the positioning of details.
Giorgia Bel: I can’t think of a time when I haven’t had music on. Softly or loudly, it’s there.
Milly Dent: A clean space, the right tools, some music and a clear mind.
Giorgia McRae: I need my studio to be clear… or at least not chaotic.


SAXON QUINN
Saxon is an emerging artist from Melbourne. Each one of Saxon’s works created for Showroom-X tie into his signature aesthetics - the use of cement, strays and texture. These elements tie together with the calming use of balance and placement. The ‘Fall Apart Together’ series explores the idea of finding strength in each other's weaknesses. Saxon’s work takes a cue from the asphalt sprawl streetscapes of our cities.


How would you best describe your art practice?

Abstract, brutalist, wabi-sabi. Much of my art is focused around being within the urban landscape – in particular, the cement material of our concrete jungles. Works represent the scarred, coarse-aggregate pavements, and walls found throughout cities and towns; from children scribbling in chalk on suburban bitumen streets to tagged walls and bubblegum littered footpaths downtown.


What drew you to this practice? Did you always want to be an artist?

My mother is an artist and works with texture in a lot of her work. I grew up surrounded by art and always knew that I would end up creating works in some medium.


What do you enjoy about it?

I love the fact that it allows me to escape and reset. I’m generally quite anxious and always on the go, but when I paint, I am able to relax and focus on painting alone.


What is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape? Do you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity?

I like the fact that creatives from all walks of life can get together and collaborate on projects. I’ve found that local artists have been very approachable when it comes to sharing knowledge and experiences.


Who are your idols?

Mum. She has a neverending positive attitude and is always sharing down knowledge. She’s the life of the party. People blossom around her.


GIORGIA BEL

Giorgia Bel is a self-taught artist who predominantly works with acrylic and oil-based paint. She began playing with paint and sketch five years ago, aspiring to simply create beauty from a darker place of ill health & recovery. Giorgia uses colour and texture to create depth in her works which focus on imagined and seen landscapes, undersea-scapes and the human form.


How would you best describe your art practice?

My art practice is my medicine, my meditation. I go, I wander in my mind, and I begin. The practice is not careful, my hand is free, and I sketch rough lines and start to fill in; colours over colours, layering, in textured strokes. It’s not a formal practice that I have learnt. It’s just exactly what I feel.


What drew you to this practice? Did you always want to be an artist?

I wanted to be a designer or an architect. I studied this but fell ill in my early twenties, putting a halt to my first years of working. My doctor told me to paint to help still my mind. I couldn’t do much at the time, so I took the advice and picked up a brush. I didn’t like it much at first, but I found rest in it. Ultimately it helped me heal. It is a great love of my life.


What do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?

I am lucky enough to be in a studio that is surrounded by plants. I walk through the alley often when taking a break to stretch. This is really stimulating.


What or who is currently inspiring your world?

I’m taking long walks being in lockdown. Using my camera to capture specks of colour I see in the path or a flower that stands out. The rocks and crashing water at the beach. There is so much to stimulate your mind as you step out of the house.


MILLY DENT

Milly Dent is a Sydney based ceramic artist. Milly reimagines everyday routines through uniquely handcrafted, exclusive ceramic works, underlied with the philosophy of creating pieces that are both utilitarian and sculptural. In her body of work for Showroom X, Milly uses white porcelain stained with black pigments to create a statement series of wares which fire to a beautiful black graphite colour, a wonderful contrast to any white space in which they sit.


How would you best describe your art practice?

My evolving collections are a continued study of the intimate, tangible and ever-challenging nature of porcelain. Learning from its history as well as new processes to create innovative, interesting work.


What do you enjoy about it?

There is something so rewarding about crafting an object from essentially nothing with your hands. Porcelain has many wonderful qualities that draw me in, including the whiteness, the translucency and the vitrified-stoney feel once fired, as well as the soft, malleable, gentle feel of the unfired material.


Are there any Australian designers you love?

Yes! Lots! Clever friends such as Evi O, Pip Stent, Tara Burke and Claire Johnson.


Who are your idols?

My creative friends!


What or who is currently inspiring your world?

The ocean. It’s refreshing, humbling and best of all, inspiring.


GIORGIA MCRAE

Giorgia McRae is a multi-disciplinary artist based in Sydney. The series of drawings she has created for Showroom-X is an ode to balance and weight, and how we need both to keep grounded in our daily lives. She explores both sculpture and drawing and has created a playful relationship between the two mediums. There is a nod to yin and yang in her work, and the beauty in simplicity, which is ever present in these pastels.


How would you best describe your art practice?

I like to think that my work is part abstract, modernist, and cubist plus a little Art Deco and a little Bauhaus – I’m maybe a little greedy with that mouthful. My process is intuitive, so each line, shape, and colour will influence the next. I don’t think I’ve ever known how one of my pieces was going to turn out - which is sometimes a blessing and sometimes a curse depending on the end result.


What drew you to this practice? Did you always want to be an artist?

Strangely enough, I always thought that I’d be a ceramicist – But almost straight away, drawing took on a life of its own. The ‘drawn’ sculptures were impossible, without bases, just floating in space.


What do you enjoy about it?

So many things! But if I had to pick one, it would have to be creating a composition that works. It’s always such a wonderful moment when you feel your mind go ‘yup, that’s enough, that’s finished.’ Or even the feeling of being on the clear road to that feeling.


What is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape? Do you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity?

It feels like there’s a nice little hum of excitement and creativity in the air – maybe because we’ve been in and out of lockdowns and people are spending money on things that will make their houses feel beautiful instead of on travel? If I’m completely honest, I’ve also quite enjoyed being able to lock myself away in my studio during the latest lockdown. It will be so nice to see what we’ve all been working on when this is all over.


What or who is currently inspiring your world?

Oh gosh, so many artists. Le Corbusier, Joan Miro, Helen Frankenthaler, Alexander Calder, Mark Rothko, Jean-Michel Basquiat – the list could go on forever.


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        For the newest injection into our Art Annex, we have gathered four of Australia’s up and coming artists to discuss their works, daily pleasures and the places they’re finding inspiration. While talking with these young Australians, each spoke to an undercurrent of intensified creative energy and collaboration in our country.
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