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MUSINGS

        
{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"8th Oct 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Muse: Cody Greenwood\r\n\r\n\tCody Greenwood established Rush Films in late 2016 and has since earned herself a reputation as one of Australia’s most promising film producers, creating internationally acclaimed documentary and short films. Her work has taken her across the world, with a throughline of music, something she described as one of the greatest sources of conversation and influence in her household growing up. Her newly released feature documentary Under the Volcano, which premiered at SXSW, brings back the heady 80s music industry. It was an era when recording budgets were limitless, and some of the world’s most influential musical artists flew or sailed to George Martin’s music studio on the Caribbean Island, Montserrat. Tucked below a volcano, AIR Studios created a temporary island home to Sting, Elton John, Earth, Wind and Fire. Exploring creativity and liminal space, Martin said it best; “Everything has a period. You bring something out of nothing, and it always goes back to nothing.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhile Cody is a patron of music, her scope of interest is comprehensive and refreshingly coincident with the times. She works alongside some of Australia’s most prominent and diverse storytellers to create authentic and thought-provoking cinema. Following its red carpet debut at CinefestOz Film Festival last month, her documentary Girl Like You is set to make its premiere at Raindance 2021 in London. Cody’s showreel is prodigious, and her field of vision acknowledges films that break boundaries and uncover stories that are felt and heard long after people watch them.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me a little about your upbringing? What is your family like?  \r\n\t Growing up, music and art were the greatest sources of conversation and influence amongst our household. My parents met in Bali in the '80s. Mum, originally from the US, was there making a documentary about the Indonesian artists in Ubud. My Dad, a local Freo boy and musician at the time, was managing a bar in Legian. Their whirlwind romance saw them move to London, where they had my brother Luke and I. They continued to live in the art world and today work as painters and writers. So much of what they taught came from travelling to far-flung places and being amongst the locals, listening to live music, and visiting exhibitions. I was incredibly lucky to have parents who looked for culture and connection in that world & encouraged us to do the same.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“I'm drawn to the unknown \r\n\tin the world       \r\n\tof documentary...\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\"I don't remember  \r\n\t\r\n\t a time\r\n\twhen I wasn't obsessed with film\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nHow would you best describe what you do professionally?  \r\n\tI love being asked this question because no one ever really knows what a film producer does. My role oscillates between the business of film - finance, deal-making, negotiation; to the creative elements- working with editors, directors, and cinematographers. In the early stages, when we only have a script or the beginnings of an idea, I drive the film's financing so that we can bring it to life. As we move towards production, I will work alongside the director to drive the vision of the film, bring in the best team, and work with investors. The multifaceted nature of the role is what I love most about producing.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you to filmmaking? Do you exclusively work in the realm of documentary film? \r\n\t \r\nI don't remember a time when I wasn't obsessed with film. One of my earliest memories is watching a film with my brother Luke on a family trip to New York. I work across both scripted and documentary films, and whilst I love both, I have a deep affection for documentary films. I'm drawn to the unknown in the world of documentary, walking onto a set and having no idea what you will get from the subject, and then looking at the realm of possibilities that exist when crafting the edit. There is also an element of education; constantly learning about the world through your subjects. And then, of course, trying to find ways to share that emotion and insight with the world is what I really love.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it?\r\n\t \r\nThe beginning and the end phases of filmmaking are my sweet spots. It's no secret amongst those I've worked with that the slow pace of being on set isn't so much for me. Where I find the most satisfaction is bringing everything together in those initial months; the challenge of financing a project and giving something structure has always come naturally. Then being able to sit in a dark room with an editor and director once we have wrapped shooting to workshop the story will always feel exciting.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat does a typical day look like for you? \r\n\t \r\nAs an incurable early riser, my most productive hours are 6-8 am. I wake and make coffee before sitting down to catch up on emails and then head to a Pilates class before going into the office. Across the course of a day, I will speak to directors, distributors, and writers, workshop ideas, and package films currently in production. When making a film, you quickly become immersed in the world of that subject matter. With Under the Volcano, that world was 1980's pop culture and music, so my office quickly became a shrine to this.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhy did you think the story of George Martin's AIR Studios was an important one to tell? \r\n\t \r\nWhen I first set out to make Under The Volcano, it was a personal story. I had grown up with the stories of AIR Studios in Montserrat. The importance of the film shifted over time from something personal to me to a story I felt needed to be shared with the world. The power of 'place' when it comes to creativity sits at the centre of Under the Volcano's story. The artists who escaped to the island did so with the belief that this hideaway provided a sort of sacred space —one where they could tap into their creative potential.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDid you feel like that would resonate with people experiencing lockdowns and isolation?\r\n\t \r\nThe last two years have forced us to reimagine/reinvent the corners of our spaces/places in entirely new ways; mourn them, miss them, and make way for new ones. For creativity and the arts, it has at times felt like a slow torture. For creatives, the world's new state of normal is here to stay & with it comes the chance to redefine how we create and connect going forward. Montserrat bred new heights of musical production technology, and already we are beginning to see similar evolutions across the arts as distance and travel continue to be restricted. As with any major world event, we are presented with an opportunity to reinvent the wheel and, in turn, parts of ourselves.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t“By the time it came to wrapping up under the Volcano, we were drawing eerie parallels with our subjects – farewelling a life that we knew and the places that we called upon in which to create. As an industry, it made us question whether we would be capable of continuing to create. It felt at times as though we would never be able to finish what we began as a team. However, what came of this forced change was not only an ability to adapt to this new world but a far deeper connection with the people around us.\"  \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires you professionally?\r\n\t \r\nThe opportunity to create content that shapes and shakes people. Films that break boundaries and uncover stories that are felt and heard long after people watch them. I also feel inspired to support and guide the next generation of Aussie talent so that they can thrive in our industry and be given the right opportunities to become world-class filmmakers.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWho do you create for? Is there an audience you have in mind during your process?\r\n\t \r\nMy ambition for Rush Films has always been to create high quality, international films with a distinct voice. So naturally, I've found myself creating for an audience who seek out stories of depth, diversity, and intrigue. Audience and story are so intertwined, and I've become significantly more selective in what I want to develop and who I want as part of the team. That will ultimately decide who my audience is.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style?\r\n\t \r\nRelaxed and minimalist. Jeans, a singlet, and sneakers are my day to day. But I love dressing up for an event. My go-to for this will often be structured suits or a statement dress.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you 'can't do without'?\r\n\t \r\nLV slides, a good pair of levis, and a vintage Fendi bag from my Grandmother's wardrobe. Her closet has given me most of my favourite pieces over the years.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat's next for you? What kind of stories do you think are essential to shed light on at this moment in time?\r\n\t \r\nIn November, my latest documentary Girl Like You will air on ABC. I worked on the film with an incredible team of female directors from Perth - Frances Elliott and Samantha Marlowe. The film was shot across six years and is a raw, intimate, and confronting insight into a young woman's experience as she transitions from male to female. I will also step into the drama realm over the coming year by developing two feature films to be filmed here in Western Australia.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat or who is inspiring your world at this moment?\r\n\t \r\nThe influx of Aussies returning from overseas who are hungry to make magic at home. The opportunity to collaborate with people from various industries whilst in Perth has been the silver lining for the last two years. From an industry perspective, female producers such as Liz Watts and Bruna Papandrea, who have carved their own pathway and are putting Australian voices on an international stage, are the ultimate inspiration for emerging Aussie filmmakers.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDescribe your workspace – where is it located, and what do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?\r\n\t \r\nI work from an office by the ocean in Cottesloe and have always needed light and space to work well. Being surrounded by like-minded people and an environment rich with ideas and collaboration is something I find so important to the creative process.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live?\r\n\t \r\nI live in Fremantle. My partner Gus and I bought a home last year in Byron Bay, and before COVID, our dream was to live between the two coasts. We met and lived in Indonesia and have always been drawn to living by the ocean. We love the pace of Byron Bay, but Fremantle has always been home. Having lived in LA and London, I'm looking forward to heading back overseas when the borders finally open.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tImages of Cody: Photographer: Ryan Murphy @telleragency / Make Up Artist: Jacinta Mcdonald @glossplus\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Cody Greenwood established Rush Films in late 2016 and has since earned herself a reputation as one of Australia’s most promising film producers, creating internationally acclaimed documentary and short films. Her work has taken her across the world, with a throughline of music, something she described as one of the greatest sources of conversation and influence in her household growing up. Her newly released feature documentary Under the Volcano, which premiered at SXSW, brings back the heady 80s music industry. It was an era when recording budgets were limitless, and some of the world’s most influential musical artists flew or sailed to George Martin’s music studio on the Caribbean Island, Montserrat. Tucked below a volcano, AIR Studios created a temporary island home to Sting, Elton John, Earth, Wind and Fire. Exploring creativity and liminal space, Martin said it best; “Everything has a period. You bring something out of nothing, and it always goes back to nothing.”\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1344, 1764, 1710, 1518, 221]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Muse: Cody Greenwood","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/cody-greenwood-47-of-66-.jpg?t=1633689737"},"title":"Muse: Cody Greenwood","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/muse-cody-greenwood/"}
Muse: Cody Greenwood

Muse: Cody Greenwood

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"22nd Jul 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"CHARLEE FRASER\r\n\tCharlee Fraser is an Australian model who has garnered global success, walking for Prada, Stella McCartney, Dior, Chanel, and Givenchy. As a proud Awabakal woman, she has quickly become a significant voice for change in the fashion community. Charlee grew up in New South Wales in a family who loves the outdoors, and her connection to Awabakal country and love for the land remains. A self-professed overachiever, Charlee is a champion for diversity and sustainability in the industry and is making real, tangible choices in her career to advocate for this.\r\nCharlee has just launched \r\n\tNot Just Trending, a campaign she describes as a collision of her connection to culture, wild childhood, and her passion for the fashion industry. It includes a Sustainable Fashion Guide that highlights ethical and sustainable brands, programs, and practices. In it, she upholds some of our most beloved labels, including ESSE, Bassike and Victoria & Woods, for their commitment to transparency and earth-friendly practice. We also worked alongside her to share our Ethical Dictionary within the guide. Charlee is committed to learning, evolving and passing down her knowledge to younger generations, and we’re humbled by her journey so far.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"I listen to my body    \r\n\ta lot. That’s the best piece of advice I can give to anyone.\"\r\n\"I fell into the industry   \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\tand then fell in love,\r\n\t\r\n\tlike all great love stories.\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\nHow would you best describe what you do professionally? \r\n\t I wear clothes in a way that encourages you to buy them. But more than that, I create artistic and immersive images that tell stories and inspire.\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you to modelling?\r\n\t \r\nI fell into the industry and then fell in love, like all great love stories.\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it?\r\n\t \r\nEverything! Like any relationship, there’s ups and downs, but I’ve learnt and grown so much from this industry. I have taken so much with me from my experiences. I wouldn’t be who I am today without it.\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires you professionally?\r\n\t \r\nMy friends, other industry creatives, general interests. I tend to follow my intuition a lot.\r\n\t\r\n\t“ I dress depending on how I feel and how I want to be perceived.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live? What does a typical day look like for you?\r\n\t \r\nI’m never in one place for too long. A day off often includes a morning workout, brunch, time outdoors, visiting family and friends, cooking a kick-ass dinner and winding down with a movie.\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your approach to dressing? And how does it make you feel?\r\n\t \r\nIt massively depends on my location and the temperature. I dress depending on how I feel and how I want to be perceived.\r\n\t\r\n\tWho are some of your favourite designers (local and international)?\r\n\t \r\nToni Maticevski, Dion Lee and Stella McCartney, to name a few. There are so many.\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you ‘can’t do without’?\r\n\t \r\nDenim. And oversized sweaters.\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me a little about your approach to beauty and wellness…\r\n\t \r\nI listen to my body a lot. That’s the best piece of advice I can give to anyone. I mostly eat very clean, exercise a lot, get plenty of rest and use natural and organic products.\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat are some changes you’ve noted in the fashion and modelling industry in recent times?\r\n\t \r\nThere has definitely been a change in terms of diversity and inclusion in the realm of ethnicity, age, shape, size and gender.\r\n\t\r\n\tHow do you envisage the future of the fashion industry? \r\n\t \r\nHopefully more environmentally and culturally aware.\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you have any idols - professional or personal?\r\n\t \r\nI look up to my sister and my friends a lot! I have a number of different idols for all different reasons. Being inspired by others is so important to me and a big part of my success. One of my favourite quotes is, “If you’re the smartest person in the room, you’re in the wrong room.\"\r\n\t\r\nWhat or who is inspiring your world at the moment? \r\n\t \r\nDocumentaries.\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?\r\n\t \r\nMy creative ideas come from conversations and experiences. It’s about how I’m feeling more than what I have around me.\r\n\t\r\n\tImage Credits: Some images from Tom Paterson @tompaterson_nz, Eddie New @eddienew_photography, Getty\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Charlee Fraser is an Australian model who has garnered global success, walking for Prada, Stella McCartney, Dior, Chanel, and Givenchy. As a proud Awabakal woman, she has quickly become a significant voice for change in the fashion community. Charlee grew up in New South Wales in a family who loves the outdoors, and her connection to Awabakal country and love for the land remains. A self-professed overachiever, Charlee is a champion for diversity and sustainability in the industry and is making real, tangible choices in her career to advocate for this.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/kitty-clark/\r\n        - /musings/what-you-need-to-know-about-fabric-dyeing/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-merino-wool/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1521, 1302, 1006, 221]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Muse: Charlee Fraser","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/photo-credit-eddie-new.jpeg?t=1626942289"},"title":"Muse: Charlee Fraser","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/muse-charlee-fraser/"}
Muse: Charlee Fraser

Muse: Charlee Fraser

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{"author":"Showroom-X","date_published":"11th Mar 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"KATARINA KROSLAKOVA\r\n\r\n\tJournalist, editor and content director Katarina Kroslakova is in the business of storytelling. “I love delving into people’s success journeys and re-telling those experiences so others can learn and be inspired.”\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tSpurred by some negative experiences with the media in her teens, Kroslakova ('KK' for short) took matters into her own hands. “Like every arrogant teenager who thinks they’re invincible, I thought to myself, ‘Hey, I could do better than that…’ I landed my first ever job with the BBC in London and the rest is history. Now, I do my utmost to represent people’s stories with truth, integrity and context.”\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tKroslakova is no stranger to multitasking, having helmed AFR’s Life & Leisure and Luxury magazines and starting her own content creation business, Primary Ideas, (among many other roles). Now, she is embarking upon one of her most exciting projects yet – bringing the New York Times’ style magazine, T Magazine, to Australian audiences. “Well, I’m proud to say The New York Times first approached me. We’d had a very successful working relationship for many years through my other jobs, and hopefully they saw something in me that showed them I could bring the T concept to Australia,” she says of her new role as T Australia’s publisher and editor. “Honestly, it’s such an honour to work on this brand. I mean, it’s madness, on a daily basis, and I’m pushing myself and the entire team to find new reserves of energy and creativity. But the reward will be worth it.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"Professionally, I look up to entrepreneurs and those willing to share \r\n\ttheir lessons and learnings.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"I share stories, really.\r\n\t\r\n\t I also help other people  \r\n\t\r\n\ttell \r\n\ttheir own stories.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhat can we expect from T Australia’s print and digital platforms? \r\n\t A strong sense of Australia, and all that entails. I want the brand to be a journal of record of where we’re at as a nation. I want to showcase the best of Australia, from our culture to our fashion, photographed in our unique style. And don’t forget our world-famous sense of humour, too.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhat does a standard day look like for you at the moment? \r\nI wake up, begrudgingly, around 5.50am because my two boys, aged 3 and 4, think sleep-ins are over-rated. Then it’s two double-shot coffees for breakfast, pre-school drop offs, and the laptop swings open for webinars, Zooms, commissioning, editing, finance spreadsheets (ugh…). I meet with PRs, advertisers, writers, advisers. Because I’m both Publisher and Editor-in-Chief, my role is incredibly varied. The key thing for me in anything I do in life is to grow and learn. And boy, has this been an epic growth journey!\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhat do you find most exciting about the current Australian creative landscape? \r\nThanks to a certain pandemic, we’ve had the most incredible influx of talent, whether it’s people stuck here, or coming back home. We’ve been spoilt for choice putting the magazine together with the best writers, stylists, photographers, models. I think exciting things will come this year from this talent pool.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style? \r\nIt has, unexpectedly, changed a lot. I was definitely a mix and match girl before I had kids, lots of bling, lots of colour, texture, more is more. Now, I’m literally the opposite. My preferred garment these days is definitely a shirt-dress, which is versatile and elegant. I unashamedly love shoes and handbags, which makes birthdays and Christmas easy for my Italian husband, who has bought half my wardrobe thanks to his impeccable taste.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWho are some of your favourite designers (local and international)? \r\nMy youngest son is called Valentino. For a reason. I also adored Karl Lagerfeld. So I have quite a few of both Valentino and Chanel. In fact, I have a vintage Valentino dress that Elizabeth Taylor once owned; I bought it at auction from her estate a few years back. \r\nMy stylist introduced me to Matin about three years ago when I was doing an Editor’s photo shoot and I fell in love straight away. SIR. is one of the most exciting labels to come from Australia in recent times, I’m excited to see what they do next. And ESSE’s aesthetic speaks to me. I love the silhouettes and beautiful draping. \r\nFor handbags, my go-to brands are Bottega Veneta, Celine, Proenza Schouler. For shoes, I’m basically a museum of Tom Ford.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe you can’t do without? \r\nI have a rainbow of Nobody jeans – every colour, every fit. I can dress them up with a navy Stella McCartney jacket, and I’m ready for (almost) anything.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tDescribe your personal approach to beauty … \r\nInvest in good quality skincare. I do wear make up nearly every day, just because of the nature of my job, and if I start the day (or night before) with a good, solid skincare routine, I feel better for it.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWho are your idols – professional and personal? \r\nProfessionally, I look up to entrepreneurs and those willing to share their lessons and learnings. I like Mark Bouris, he’s got a pragmatic, can-do attitude and doesn’t suffer fools. \r\nPersonally, I have an incredible group of girlfriends who run their own businesses, and often juggle it all with kids, pets, husbands and well, life. I can complain, commiserate, celebrate, whatever is necessary – and I know it will resonate!\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhat (or who) else is currently inspiring your world (music, film, art, literature, etc) …  \r\nI’m obsessed with good magazine covers at the moment, so I’ve been inspired by the creative teams behind Vanity Fair, The New Yorker of course, The Economist, Empire, TIME. A good cover is a work of art. The Chinese classical pianist Lang Lang has a new album of J.S.Bach’s Goldberg Variations out now, so that’s been my background on repeat.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Journalist, editor and content director Katarina Kroslakova is in the business of storytelling. “I love delving into people’s success journeys and re-telling those experiences so others can learn and be inspired.”\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Showroom-X\r\n    image: /product_images/import/L-parallax-3-image-9.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-linen/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [221, 334, 335, 290]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Katarina Kroslakova","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/nobody-jeans.jpg?t=1615447943"},"title":"Katarina Kroslakova","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/katarina-kroslakova/"}
Katarina Kroslakova

Katarina Kroslakova

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{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"13th Feb 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"KITTY CLARK\r\n\r\n\tFor founder and director of Saint Cloche gallery, Kitty Clark, her work is about so much more than just staging exhibitions – describing herself as “a producer and curator of talent and potential across many creative avenues”\r\n\r\n\r\nFor founder and director of Saint Cloche gallery, Kitty Clark, her work is about so much more than just staging exhibitions – describing herself as “a producer and curator of talent and potential across many creative avenues”. Clark launched the Paddington (Sydney) gallery six years ago, as an avenue to support emerging and mid-career artists.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"I have to have a  \r\n\tdeep connection to the work in order to want to represent them\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"It’s important to me that the \r\n\t\r\n\t artists themselves  \r\n\trealise their \r\n\t\r\n\town \r\n\tauthentic storytelling ability.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tOf the current creative landscape, Clark is invigorated by the surge of interest in artistic pursuits. “Since COVID we’ve seen a surge in people wanting to connect and seeking out great art. I think that’s because art helps inspire and heal in these difficult times,” she explains.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“People travel to other worlds voyeuristically through art even though we are having to be stuck at home. I know I do this myself.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tTell me a little about your upbringing – where you we born and raised, what your family was like? \r\n\t I was born in Malaysia and raised in a little town called Klang, close to a port … I remember Mango, Papaya and Coconut trees in the garden with chooks running around. In the mornings we would go to the local farmers markets together to buy our food. I spent a lot of hours in the kitchen watching my grandma cook and also tending to her veggie and flower garden. These are some of my most fond childhood memories.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhat drew you to the world of art? What do you love most about it? \r\nI started out wanting to be an artist and got side-tracked by the fashion industry which, back then, was far more creative, I feel. With my Asian upbringing, being an artist was probably not thought of as the best career in order to put food on the table - not that my parents discouraged it, but they worried about my being able to make a good living out of being a struggling artist.\r\n\r\n\r\nI was looking for more creative freedom and coming from the corporate world of fashion I was drawn once more into the art world, but rather than being the artist, I now produce and nurture other emerging artists and am still quite connected to fashion in that I am still inspired by that world and draw from that world. Curation and producing interesting, innovative exhibitions is my own personal art form.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAre you working on any exhibitions you can tell us about at the moment? \r\nEmily Imeson with Ancient River, River Red, which is the next show. I love her story where she decided to give up living in ‘society’ and adventures through the outback, immersing herself in traversing this great land in her trusted [Toyota] Troopy to gain a better understanding of her relationship to the land.\r\n\r\n\r\nDavid Whitworth, with his debut solo show Falling Awake which will feature a series of humble, quiet observations of moments expressed through painting a variety of special spots he frequents that he feels, give him a sense of place.\r\n\r\n\r\nFollowing her successful first solo show at Sydney Contemporary 2019, I am very excited for Evi O’s upcoming second solo show, GIANT. In this body of work, Evi investigates the light and dark sides of big matters. In physical form, natural and man-made monoliths help identify our place in the universe.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style? \r\nDay-to-day I like relaxed luxury, feeling confident and comfortable at the same time is essential. Dressing for occasions I love ‘mod’ silhouettes - fine tailoring with a nod to 60s symmetry in distinctive materials and block colours with a hint of jewellery. For work events I love wearing structured blazers (I have an obsession with blazers), with a silk tank or fine cotton tee, and a relaxed fit pant or jeans and mid-height heels to elevate the look.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWho are some of your favourite designers? \r\nInternational: Saint Laurent, Gucci, Chanel, Christopher Kane, Junya Watanabe, Francoise, Giuliva Heritage Collection, Valentino. I also love seeking out vintage luxury pieces. Australian designers: Scanlan Theodore, KitX, Matteau, Ellery, R.M. Williams.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you can’t do without? \r\nI can’t go past a relaxed fit crisp white shirt – a section of my wardrobe is dedicated to my collection of white shirts. Black Leather sandals. I don’t leave the house without sunglasses.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhat you think about the concept of ‘beauty’ in the modern age? \r\nDiversity, being natural, confident and being authentic is true beauty.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWho are your idols? \r\nDefinitely Tom Ford – he is one person I admire and why I wanted to be in fashion and aspired to, and eventually did work for Gucci. Pierre Cardin, known as ‘fashion’s architect’, his innovative designs transcended into sculpture and architecture - both of them showed such versatility as creatives which is so inspiring to me.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        For founder and director of Saint Cloche gallery, Kitty Clark, her work is about so much more than just staging exhibitions – describing herself as “a producer and curator of talent and potential across many creative avenues”\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-linen/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1033, 1038, 706,725]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"KITTY CLARK","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/saint-cloche-instagram-kitty-clarke.jpg?t=1613119748"},"title":"KITTY CLARK","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/kitty-clark/"}
KITTY CLARK

KITTY CLARK

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{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"21st Jan 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: NICOLE TRUNFIO\r\n\r\n\tBorn in Dubbo, NSW, and raised in Merredin, Western Australia, multihyphenate Nicole Trunfio recalls her childhood spent with her sprawling Italian family on their farm riding dirtbikes, go-carts and making their own wine and tomato sauce.\r\n\r\n\r\n16,608 kilometres away from her hometown, model, designer and CEO of ERTH Jewelry, Trunfio and her family now reside in Austin Texas. “It’s funny, it’s actually a very similar landscape as South Western Australia, where I spent the second part of my childhood,” she says.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            I see so much coming out of  \r\n\tAustralia.   \r\n\t these days, especially living abroad…\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nIt makes me so proud. \r\n\t\r\n\t It really inspires me and pushes me \r\n\t\r\nto be better as an entrepreneur\r\n\t\r\n\t and designer.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n“I love being around wineries and breweries, watching the process and experiencing good craftsmanship. It's always been a dream of mine to make my own wine, maybe have and live on my own winery, and put to the test the way my dad showed us how to make wine, his wine was the best. ”\r\n\r\n\r\nReflecting on her life back in Australia, Trunfio most-missed list includes a favourite swimming spot (“The North Bondi rock”), the beaches, food, relaxed way of life, Aussie humor and the fashion industry she considers family. It’s a lifestyle she would one day like to share with her three children, Zion, Gia and Ella Wolf.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“I want my kids to be able to jump off the rock in North Bondi, eat at Icebergs, explore Surry Hills in the winter and take them to the outback.”  \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t As for local bucket list locations, North-Western Australia and the Northern Territory are high on Trunfio’s dream adventure billing. “I would love to feel the history of the land and learn more about Aboriginal culture and history, that would be a real blessing and honor,” she says.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tTrunfio takes a huge amount of pride in the outpouring of creative Australian influence overseas, within industries such as fashion, architecture, furniture and design. “I see so much coming out of Australia these days, especially living abroad … It makes me so proud. It really inspires me and pushes me to be better as an entrepreneur and designer.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Born in Dubbo, NSW, and raised in Merredin, Western Australia, multihyphenate Nicole Trunfio recalls her childhood spent with her sprawling Italian family on their farm riding dirtbikes, go-carts and making their own wine and tomato sauce.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/muse-jess-gomes/\r\n        - /musings/secret-australia-the-travelista/\r\n        - /musings/secret-australia-bella-thomas/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [866, 1000, 926, 860]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: NICOLE TRUNFIO","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/41339814-767166723615429-964139949170802386-n.jpg?t=1611201403"},"title":"MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: NICOLE TRUNFIO","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/my-secret-australia-nicole-trunfio/"}
MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: NICOLE TRUNFIO

MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: NICOLE TRUNFIO

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{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"2nd Nov 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Muse: Jess Gomes\r\n\r\n\tModel, actor and beauty entrepreneur Jessica Gomes has been based in the USA for the past 15 years (calling Los Angeles home for eight), but her heart is still very much in her hometown of Perth, Western Australia.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n“I miss my family. I miss the simple things like going to Mum's house for a home-cooked meal or being able to walk down the street to my sister's house. Western Australia does remind me of California in a way, the landscape and the blue skies,” says Gomes over the phone from her home in LA. “When I was growing up it felt like the most isolated place in the world but now, more than ever, it's feels like one of the most sacred places in the world that you could be in.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t “I say this to a lot of young models:  \r\n\t You have a strong sense of self.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t  “I didn't fit in a box\r\n\t and thats OK\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nGomes’s father is Portuguese and her mother Singaporean-Chinese, giving the model her otherworldly beauty that has seen her career on a steep trajectory since she left home at 17 to chase an international career in modelling.\r\n\r\n\r\nIn those early days in the Big Apple, when she was working with global fashion brands and shooting editorials with Harper’s BAZAAR, Vogue and Glamour, she lived with fellow Perth model and fashion darling, Gemma Ward. Kindred spirits, you were more likely to find the pair at home reading on a Saturday evening than in a hot new nightclub.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Gemma was always somebody that I looked up to, and when we first moved to New York we would sit around and she would she tell me about books she had read, books that I hadn't even heard of. We talked about film and things other than modelling. I feel lucky that I got to grow up with an incredibly unique and intelligent woman.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t “I just worked so much in those formative years – first leaving Perth to go to work in Asia, then to New York. And I always had this thing – that because I didn't go to university I needed to make up for it. So, I was always reading a lot and looking up words in the dictionary. I was trying to educate myself because I was meeting all these highly educated people and incredibly talented writers. It was the circle we were moving in. It was definitely the days before social media, even before the whole celebrity thing.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tGomes says she is still a homebody these days, which made it easy to adapt to the chilled-out LA lifestyle. She’s adopted the West Coast uniform of flowing sundresses, jumpsuits, jeans and t-shirts and flats, and she meditates, hikes in the Hollywood Hills and keeps her cupboard well stocked with multi-vitamins and fresh organic food. That incredible skin is thanks to her skincare brand Equal Beauty, of which she is CEO, and the Beauty Chef’s Glow.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“And I get my sleep these days,” she says. “I'm pretty boring!” After a career like hers, well, a bit of boring sounds more than deserved.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Model, actor and beauty entrepreneur Jessica Gomes has been based in the USA for the past 15 years (calling Los Angeles home for eight), but her heart is still very much in her hometown of Perth, Western Australia.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Kellie Hush\r\n    image: /product_images/import/kellie-hush.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [878, 864, 859, 868]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Muse: Jess Gomes","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/jg-parallax-3-image-10.jpg?t=1604299792"},"title":"Muse: Jess Gomes","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/muse-jess-gomes/"}
Muse: Jess Gomes

Muse: Jess Gomes

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{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"16th Sep 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: BELLA THOMAS\r\n\r\n\tIn the second of our \r\n\tMy Secret Australia series, model-artist-photographer Bella Thomas talks effortless beauty and secret hiking trails.\r\n\r\n\r\nAsk Bella Thomas what she does for a living and her answer will likely change depending on the day. “I would describe myself as some kind of artist,” she says. “Some weeks I’m modelling full time, some days I find myself taking photos, creating with clay or have my head deep in photoshop. I don’t like to box myself in, makes me anxious,” she laughs.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\nBorn and raised by the Sydney shoreline, Thomas grew up with sandy feet and hot salted chips at sunset. “The beauty in simplicity is what I cherish and find most special.” This sense of simplicity in her surrounding environments imbues much of her creative output. “I don’t like to over complicate anything. When I have a project to do I come up with ideas and then keep peeling it back, aiming to always show beauty in the most effortless way,” she reflects. “True beauty is effortless, just like the Australian landscape.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t “Our world, in particular Australia, is so magnificent.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t  “True beauty is\r\n\t effortless”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nThomas’s perception of success, and the industry, reflects her laid-back, intuitive spirit. “Being part of the fashion industry, and coming from how I was raised, I am realising more and more [how] much I need ‘simple’.”\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\nWhen in search of creative inspiration, she turns her gaze to the NSW coastline (“The south coast of NSW has me in awe every time I take the drive down. I love the people and the landscape”), but it’s the WA shoreline that holds a special place in her heart.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“A few years ago I went to Perth for a job. We drove eight hours from the airport to Esperance, and then another three hours by boat to this natural pink lake on an island. It was so surreal.”\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tThough she holds her secret hideaways close to her chest, she is happy to share her new favourite hiking trail. “One new hiking spot I’ve recently come across is a gem, it’s up in the Bouddi National Park. I think you start at Putty Beach … it’s pretty!” As for where Thomas dreams of exploring next? “I’d love to explore Tasmania more, have heard there is so much beauty to see!”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        In the second of our My Secret Australia series, model-artist-photographer Bella Thomas talks effortless beauty and secret hiking trails.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [497, 295, 217, 743]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Secret Australia: BELLA THOMAS","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/parallax-1-image-3.jpg?t=1600243864"},"title":"Secret Australia: BELLA THOMAS","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/secret-australia-bella-thomas/"}
Secret Australia: BELLA THOMAS

Secret Australia: BELLA THOMAS

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{"author":"Victoria Pearson","date_published":"9th Sep 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"MY SECRET AUSTRALIA: SIR\r\n\r\n\tIn the first of Showroom-X’s \r\n\tMy Secret Australia series, we talk inspiring landscapes with SIR co-founders, Nikki Campbell and Sophie Coote.\r\n\r\n\r\nFor resortwear label SIR’s co-founders, Nikki Campbell and Sophie Coote, the ocean has always held special significance. Campbell, born and raised in Newcastle, credits her coastal childhood for shaping much of who she is today.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            “As a family we grew up on the   \r\n\tbeach\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nsome of my\r\n\t fondest memories were made there.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nAcross the country, Coote spent her formative years amidst the untouched beauty of Perth, Western Australia.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Growing up there was a beautiful experience. My childhood was spent exploring the coastlines of Rottnest Island and the southern coastal regions of Margaret River and Yallingup,” she recalls. “Perth has influenced my relaxed approach toward dressing and minimal femme aesthetic.”\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIt comes as no surprise, then, that the brand finds some of its greatest inspiration in Australian seascapes. “SIR was born along the coast – we have always drawn inspiration from our hometowns and coastal upbringing. It is that … culture, and desire to travel, which shaped the conception of the brand and continues to inspire our designs and collections.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tLaunched in 2014, SIR’s signature aesthetic is quintessentially Australian – separates, intimates and ready-to-wear pieces cut in versatile fabrications, designed to pair back effortlessly with any capsule wardrobe. The collections are feminine, easy-wearing with subtle touches of whimsy, making them favourites of the beach-to-BBQ-to-event lifestyle that Australians have so lovingly cultivated.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“The Australian landscape has an incredible contrast of harsh and soft lines – this inspires a lot of our collections with natural fibres, soft embroidery and feminine florals contrasted with tailored suiting and utilitarian pieces.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tFor the brand’s recent collection, Preface ’20, Campbell and Coote looked again to the ocean – specifically, the NSW South Coast town of Kiama. “It holds this untouched beauty,” the pair describe of the location. “The rugged cliff faces contrasted with soft with green fields are unlike any other coastal landscape we had shot against before. It showcases our incredible Australian coastline in a new lens.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhen it comes to other sources of inspiration, Campbell and Coote cite Uluru as place of special significance. “We have travelled there a few times now and it’s even more amazing each time we visit,” they describe. “The energy is other-worldly; the colours of the landscapes and skies are like no other. It is such a special place and we’re so honoured to have spent such so much time there.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAs for where they’ve got their sights set next? “Lord Howe Island – we’ve never been and it looks so beautiful and serene. We have shifted our travel focused this year to discovering new destinations within our reach. There is so many incredible destinations right in our own backyard.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        In the first of Showroom-X’s My Secret Australia series, we talk inspiring landscapes with SIR co-founders, Nikki Campbell and Sophie Coote.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Victoria Pearson\r\n    image: /product_images/import/Victoria-Pearson-2.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [821, 819, 822, 497]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Secret Australia: SIR","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/sir-parallax-1-image-1.jpg?t=1599640761"},"title":"Secret Australia: SIR","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/secret-australia-sir/"}
Secret Australia: SIR

Secret Australia: SIR

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{"author":"Katarina Kroslakova","date_published":"8th Jul 2020","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Kym Ellery\r\n\r\nThe head of a global fashion powerhouse hasn’t forgotten where she comes from.\r\n\r\n\tKym Ellery might be a proud Parisian resident these days, but the cultural and artistic influences from her upbringing in rural Western Australia, and subsequent emergence as a Sydney fashion authority, continue to resound through her Ellery brand.\r\n\r\n\r\nEllery is now an international success story, with global sales and substantial recognition on the runways of the world’s fashion capitals. Even the fashion-savvy French, with whom she now mingles since relocating from Australia in 2016, are major fans of her work.\r\n\r\n\r\n“The fact that I meet girls [in Paris] who know Ellery, and love it, is exciting and says something for all the hard work we have put in over the years,” she says. “French girls are brought up to love and be aware of art and design and fashion. It’s an important part of their lives, so I’m enjoying that, too.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nIn spite of closing the brand’s two Sydney boutiques in 2019 and moving production to Italy, Ellery’s thoughts and designs frequently return to her spiritual home.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n“I am Australian, always will be,” she says. “Being in nature is something that always inspires me, and Australian nature even more so. How profound it is to walk through the bush; there is so much beauty and so much space to think, to be present and to allow yourself to think creatively.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n“But also that relaxed energy in Australia. Even talking about art isn’t heavy, there’s a lightness to Australia compared to here. We describe France as the dark forest, and Australia as the field of daisies. They’re very contrasting in the way people think, and how things are done. But I’ve been lucky enough to have part of both.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nTying together her two worlds, Ellery made her 2017 debut foray into the world-renowned Paris Fashion Week with the assistance of two Australian friends: artist Benjamin Barretto and curator Joseph Allen Shea.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n“It was a very important moment, and in order to capture something of the work that I had already done and was presenting to a new audience for the first time in Europe, I decided to collaborate with Ben, an artist who was an inspiration to me,” she explains.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n“He’s an Australian who was making weavings out of abseiling rope and bricklayers’ line. He would make these beautiful weavings and explore the concept of using these very masculine materials to sit and do a very slow, soft process of weaving to create beautiful wall hanging and tapestry-type artworks.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n“So when I saw those pieces I was really moved and inspired by them and approached him, and the gallery owner, Joseph, and we collaborated on some pieces for the opening Ellery show. He made some panels to the specified size, and I stitched them into corsets that were then on the runway.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nGrowing up watching her mother, Debra, become a successful multi-media artist, Ellery wanted to follow in her footsteps before discovering the magnetic pull of fashion.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n“I spent a lot of time with her from a very young age, going to her art studio with her friends where she would make ceramics and paint and do print making,” Kym says.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n“There was a lot of art around me, so it very much influenced who I was; even through high school it was very much what my focus was. Fashion was something I loved but art was who I was. It was a part of me and it still is.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n“That’s largely influenced how I approach fashion, because even today I still have to remind myself that a collection has to be functional and wearable and beautiful on a female body, but I always look at it as a presentation, as one artwork,” she reflects.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n“Each collection to me is one concept together. So it’s heavily influenced how I approach design and how I approach clothes as an object, as a usable, functional designed object.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nFrom her self-imposed exile in France – “Being based in Paris was always part of my plan since day one” – Ellery still draws inspiration from the Sydney artistic community she discovered when she moved there in the early 2000s.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n“It was around 2004 that I arrived and there was such a buzz. I discovered this art scene in Surry Hills and this amazing art gallery called China Heights. The owner, Edward (Woodley), is a good friend of mine, and that was the place where I showed my first collection, in his gallery.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n“I think that moment in time, there was a huge amount of creativity in that community, and a lot of those people I am still very close friends with and I consider influences on my work.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Kym Ellery\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        The head of a global fashion powerhouse hasn’t forgotten where she comes from.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Katarina Kroslakova\r\n    image: /product_images/import/KK-Head-Shot.jpg\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/place-of-influence/\r\n        - /musings/in-conversation-with-showroomx-muse-kym-ellery/\r\n        - /musings/personal-best/\r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land-postcards-from-terra-australis-incognito/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [432, 420, 419, 416]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Kym Ellery","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/kym-ellery-blog-tile.jpg?t=1595146055"},"title":"Kym Ellery","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/kym-ellery/"}
Kym Ellery

Kym Ellery

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