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MUSINGS

        
{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"1st Oct 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Clementine Stoney Maconachie\r\n\tClementine Stoney Maconachie is a sculptor of precise and evocative works. She grew up on a big hill outside Albury with her parents, grandmother, and an ever-expanding garden. Clementine was born of artistic lineage, surrounded by her mother's abstract and landscape oil paintings, and credits the creative immersion of her childhood as a key influence in her art.\r\nHer work is centred on simplicity, embracing imperfection, and the contrast of hard materials with soft shapes. Clementine predominantly sculpts with metal and stone, and in 2015, founded the creative agency The Visuals. In conversation with Clementine, we discuss her seeking inspiration in \"Isamu Noguchi, Barbara Hepworth, Henri Matisse, Frida Kahlo, and all the amazing women who came before and did awesome things.\" And Clementine notes she is often hit with ideas in moments of in-between, when driving, waiting, or daydreaming. Clementine channels her life's energy into art and family, and we were humbled to talk with this grounded and impassioned woman.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"An idea can strike  \r\n\tanywhere often when driving, waiting for something, or just daydreaming.\"\r\n“I have a large amount of \r\n\t\r\n\tshiny,    \r\n\t\r\n\tsparkly,\r\n\tfancy clothes\r\n\tfor a life I don't lead.“\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n What drew you to the practice of sculpture?  \r\n\t I’m not sure what originally drew me to sculpture. I grew up surrounded by art and sculpture. For as long as I can remember I have been drawn to sculptures. I love contemporary art, but I didn’t study art at school, choosing workshop instead, which I adored.\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it?\r\n\t \r\nI enjoy everything about it. I just love turning an idea into a physical object. It's very satisfying.\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires your creative practice?\r\n\t \r\nOh, so much. I definitely get inspired by materials. If I come across a building material or anything that I haven’t used before, I love thinking of the different things I could create with it.\r\nShape, line and contrast are the other things that inspire me. It always comes back down to these things, and the relationship between them.\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live?\r\n\t \r\nI live in a little terrace in Edgecliff in Sydney’s eastern suburbs. It fronts onto a park which is really calming and especially incredible being that it’s so close to the city.\r\n\t“Shape, line and contrast are the other things that inspire me. It always comes back down to these things, and the relationship between them.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat does a typical day look like for  you?\r\n\t \r\nA busy breakfast with the five of us getting ready and out the door. I drop the kids, Maximilla, Hendrix, and Matisse, to school. I then continue to my studio in Alexandria and get to work or play. If I'm in the studio, I am making. It's a short day in the studio, so there are not many breaks, as I need to be back for school pick up. But I have two longer days thanks to some after school activities. On those days I can really get into the zone.\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape?\r\n\t \r\nI think in challenging times there is opportunity if you look for it and have the capacity to adapt.I feel like a lot of creativity has come out of this crazy period in our lives. For me personally, it changed my business. It pushed me to do the things I really wanted to do, but was not able to be all-in with, due to taking on other work and projects.\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style?\r\n\t \r\nIt’s pretty eclectic. I have a good range of staple wardrobe pieces that I have collected over years. I then have a few fun statement pieces. I have a large amount of shiny, sparkly, fancy clothes for a life I don't lead. They’re there just in case, so I’m all set if I get invited at the last minute to a black tie event, an opening, or some other formal occasion.\r\n\t\r\n\tWho are some of your favourite designers (local and international)?\r\n\t \r\nLocally, I love Esse Studios, Matteau, Sir the Label, Macgraw, Camilla and Marc, ARTCLUB, Sarah-Jane Clark, Lee Matthews and Kit X. Internationally, The Row, Celine and Dries Van Norten\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you ‘can’t do without’?\r\n\t \r\nA great pair of jeans, leather jacket, perfectly worn t-shirt. I love a classic, well-made, quality staple piece. Then I need something with a bit more personality, like a kimono, some interesting sunglasses, something a little extra.\r\n\t\r\n\tWho are your idols?\r\n\t \r\nIsamu Noguchi, Barbara Hepworth, Henri Matisse, Frida Kahlo, and all the amazing women who came before and did awesome things.\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat or who is currently inspiring your world at the moment (music, art, literature, etc) \r\n\t \r\nMargel Hinder, the Australian-American modernist sculptor. I just finished the books ‘Mythos’ and ‘Heroes’ by Stephen Fry, so all things surrounding Greek mythology. I’m also looking forward to seeing what Cj Hendry does for her ‘STRAYA’ show.\r\n\t\r\n\tDescribe your workspace - where is it located and what do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?\r\n\t \r\nMy studio is located in Alexandria in Sydney’s Inner west. I don’t need much to feel creatively motivated, just materials or offcuts, so that when I think of something I can test it out straight away. It does mean the studio is always full of bits and pieces, but often it's just looking at one of those bits in a different way which will be the catalyst for the next series.\r\n\t\r\nCan you take me through the creative and physical process in making one of your works, from inception to the final piece.\r\n\t \r\nAn idea can strike anywhere, often when driving, waiting for something, or just daydreaming. Then it sort of just floats around in my head for a while.  If it happens in the studio, I usually try to make it straight away,  but otherwise it evolves in my head until I have a chance to realise it or test it out. Today I had one while waiting for a doctor's appointment. I made it this afternoon, and now I can feel a whole series coming on. Other ideas are still waiting patiently to get made. Then there are other sculptures that seem to just happen with little or no plan. They come out of holding something in my hands, and just playing, or testing if something will work.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Clementine Stoney Maconachie is a sculptor of precise and evocative works. She grew up on a big hill outside Albury with her parents, grandmother, and an ever-expanding garden. Clementine was born of artistic lineage, surrounded by her mother's abstract and landscape oil paintings, and credits the creative immersion of her childhood as a key influence in her art. \r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/kitty-clark/\r\n        - /musings/what-you-need-to-know-about-fabric-dyeing/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-merino-wool/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1797, 1796, 1795]","tags":[{"name":"portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Artist in Residence: Clementine Stoney Maconachie","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/clemstudio-1.jpeg?t=1633073863"},"title":"Artist in Residence: Clementine Stoney Maconachie","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/artist-in-residence-clementine-stoney-maconachie/"}
Artist in Residence: Clementine Stoney Maconachie

Artist in Residence: Clementine Stoney Maconachie

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"9th Sep 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Ginger & Smart\r\n\r\n\tFounded in 2002 by Sydney-based sisters Alexandra and Genevieve Smart, Ginger & Smart designs for spirited women whose style is an expression of their individuality. A sense of cool confidence and discovery underpins the Ginger & Smart design aesthetic, deftly combining the polished and the playful aspects of a woman. We have come to expect beautifully considered and timeless pieces from the label, but dig a little deeper, and there is a throughline of social responsibility and respect for the planet in everything they create. From their approach to design, fabric selection and manufacturing partners, Ginger & Smart live by three pillars; sustainability, ethical trading and giving back to the community. As part of introducing the label to the Showroom-X family, we met with Genevieve Smart to discuss inspiration, sustainable practice and hopes for what lies ahead. In conversation with Genevieve, her reverence for the industry to which she has dedicated her life and optimism for its future speak volumes.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIt’s beautiful that you two sisters have built something meaningful together… What was your upbringing like?  \r\n\tWe spent much of our early childhood in the UK. Our parents were in book publishing, so we were surrounded by creative artists and writers from a young age. There are three Smart sisters; Eloise, Alexandra and I. We were all educated in Sydney.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"The clothes we wear are one of the truest forms of \r\n\tself-expression and a reflection of the world in which we      \r\n\tlive.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"I enjoy the  \r\n\t\r\n\thuman\r\n\telement of fashion.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nHow would you best describe what you do professionally?  \r\n\t I’m Creative Director and Designer for Ginger & Smart, so I lead the creative and design the collections. Alex is Managing Director, and she would be described as a creative business leader.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you both to fashion design? \r\n\t \r\nAs a young teen, I knew I was going to be a fashion designer. I’ve often wondered what drew me to it so strongly. I’ve always loved the transformative and intuitive element of fashion. Alex worked in fashion magazines and was the first editor of Oyster magazine, so she also had a passion for the industry.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me a little about Ginger & Smart. What motivated you to start the label?\r\n\t \r\nAt the heart of it, we wanted to create something meaningful - A brand that combined luxury, sustainability and a legacy we could be proud of. We knew our completely different skill sets together could create something special together.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it? \r\n\t \r\nI enjoy the human element of fashion. The clothes we wear are one of the truest forms of self-expression and a reflection of the world in which we live. Fashion design takes intuition and comes from a sixth sense of what will resonate months before its release. When a design lands and customers really feel it... that’s the moment.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style?\r\n\t \r\nPragmatically femme.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you ‘can’t do without’?\r\n\t \r\nI live in our Edition 3 blazer. I wear it a few sizes too big to amplify the oversized feel. Our Collective leather track pants are also on rotation in my wardrobe in tan and black. All these core Ginger & Smart pieces pair effortlessly with our new season prints and colours and are perennial.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat role do colour and print have in your designs?\r\n\t \r\nPrints are how we tell the story of the collection and often where it all begins. Our prints are never conventional. A floral will always have a twist. This season, the Night Grass print began as photographs of wet grass taken on a phone during a moonlit walk in the Summer lockdown. The tiny grass flowers were ginger coloured under the moon. Our colour palette has always been a way to set the temperature for the collection.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t“The fabric content in a garment has the greatest impact on the planet, so sustainable sourcing is non-negotiable.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWho do you design for? \r\n\t \r\nThe Ginger & Smart customer is a spirited woman whose style is an expression of her individuality. We design for women who appreciate quality and longevity and to whom sustainability is essential. She is drawn to print and colour and loves the feel of silk on her skin.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow do you ensure a high standard of ethical practise is upheld?\r\n\t \r\nWe only work with global suppliers who have transparent ethical policies regarding their impact on people and the planet and who are regularly audited. Locally we engage in the process of an audit on our ethical practices with ECA. It’s a great process for full transparency across the business.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tYou also focus on selecting sustainable fabrics. What is your ethos and method for having a sustainable approach to design? \r\n\t \r\nThe fabric content in a garment has the greatest impact on the planet, so sustainable sourcing is non-negotiable. It’s at the core of what we do, from the linings to labels, zipper tapes and buttons. They are mostly recycled or from sustainable materials. We approach design with longevity as a high priority through enduring quality but also in style. We hope our pieces stay in our customers’ wardrobes for years and are handed down with love.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat are some changes you’ve noted in the fashion industry in recent times?\r\n\t \r\nDiversity, sustainability and social responsibility are now becoming business as usual for most leading Australian designers. Designers realise that we can influence social change by setting the right standards within our businesses and advocating for change.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape? \r\n\t \r\nI’m excited about the new generation of First Nation fashion designers in Australia and the stories of their connection to Country.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity? Something within the realm of design or dressing that feels innately Australian?\r\n\t \r\nThere is a sense of space and connection to the landscape and the light, which I see reflected in Australian design, particularly architecture and interior design. Australian design isn’t so tied to conventional ideas, so we can break the rules and be bold and inventive.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat or who is inspiring your world at this moment? And what inspires you professionally? \r\n\t \r\nBeauty and learning inspire me. At this moment in time, the Arts, kindness and good leadership are particularly inspiring.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat does luxury mean to you?  \r\n\t \r\nTime is a luxury to me. Sustainability is luxury. It takes time to create things that don’t take from the precious resources of future generations. Time with my loved ones is also priceless.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhere is your studio located? Is there anything you need around you to feel creatively motivated? \r\n\t \r\nOur studio is in Rosebery in Sydney. In usual times it’s full of the buzzing infectious energy of our team that I’ve really missed in lockdown. But I always design remotely in Avalon with my fabrics, a mannequin, an Apple pen, and Procreate. Music motivates me when I’m designing, so I’m forever trading playlists with friends.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live? \r\n\t \r\nI live in Avalon on Sydney’s Northern Beaches. In lockdown, it’s hard to recall a typical day. Right now, my day starts with some form of mental or physical exercise in nature, followed by a strong coffee. Most days, I’m working on the collection or creative directing shoots remotely or on an endless procession of Zooms with my team. I try to break for a sunset walk with a friend at Palm Beach to capture the last beauty of the day. The sunset is wildly different every day, which somehow reminds me that every day is different.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Founded in 2002 by Sydney-based sisters Alexandra and Genevieve Smart, Ginger & Smart designs for spirited women whose style is an expression of their individuality. A sense of cool confidence and discovery underpins the Ginger & Smart design aesthetic, deftly combining the polished and the playful aspects of a woman. We have come to expect beautifully considered and timeless pieces from the label, but dig a little deeper, and there is a throughline of social responsibility and respect for the planet in everything they create. From their approach to design, fabric selection and manufacturing partners, Ginger & Smart live by three pillars; sustainability, ethical trading and giving back to the community. As part of introducing the label to the Showroom-X family, we met with Genevieve Smart to discuss inspiration, sustainable practice and hopes for what lies ahead. In conversation with Genevieve, her reverence for the industry to which she has dedicated her life and optimism for its future speak volumes. \r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1784, 1783, 1781, 1755, 1758]","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Ginger & Smart","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/ginger-smart-blog-tile.jpg?t=1631244257"},"title":"Ginger & Smart","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/ginger-smart/"}
Ginger & Smart

Ginger & Smart

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"7th Sep 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Anya Brock\r\n\r\n\tAnya Brock is an Australian painter who has quickly gained notoriety for her spirited and bold use of colour and strokes. Effervescent, pragmatic and unreserved, Anya is a woman who contains multitudes. Her energy is contagious and flows through her painted works which are recognisably figurative without entering realism. She identifies strongly with the abstract expressionists of 1950's America. A self-proclaimed hermit, Anya has perfected the balance of planting her feet in reality while keeping her head in the clouds. Anya lives in South Fremantle with her husband and two children and dedicates her life to her family and art. And a short description of her personal style has us wanting to raid her wardrobe. Speaking with Anya reminds us to take risks, be bold, and embrace wonder in our daily lives.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tTell me a little about your upbringing.  \r\n\t I was brought up in a very stable and normal middle-class family in Alfred Cove. My parents owned their own business called Chair Repair which, as you can guess, fixed chairs! So we always went to the workshop after school and made things out of scrap wood and fabric. I think we were encouraged to make things out of what we had instead of buying shiny new things. My sister and I have always been makers with entrepreneurial spirits.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Without it, I’d be completely lost. It also teaches me discipline but equally allows me to \r\n\tescape      \r\n\tthe realities of being an adult human being and mother.\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\"Rationality is thrown out and \r\n\t\r\n\t in its place is \r\n\tproblem-solving \r\n\t risk-taking, wonder and bold moves.\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nHow would you best describe what you do professionally?  \r\n\tI’d say I’m a painter, but I’m also a designer and businesswoman. I generally swap between any of these identities depending on what day of the week it is and where the moon is at. I bounce between abstraction and figuration and try to involve a little of each in everything I do.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you to painting? \r\n\t \r\nI actually didn’t love painting in high school. Mainly because we were taught very traditional techniques, and that didn’t interest me. I then studied fashion textiles at TAFE. We had a pretty loose drawing lecturer called John Greuw. He taught us super experimental mark-making, like taking away our paintbrushes and giving us jars and forks to paint with. He also made us make our paintbrushes out of our own hair. I loved this irreverent approach. The idea that perfection is the enemy opened up a light and enjoyable way of creating for me. Knowing that accidents or mistakes are what give an artwork character was incredibly freeing. It meant that I could create (and live) courageously, knowing that everything is just problem-solving. Nothing is futile.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires you professionally?\r\n\t \r\nI think, like most artists, I find “the professional world” a weird place to be. I guess I’ve always felt like “being a professional” is somewhat of an act because, in reality, I’m a child. So I don’t really think about what inspires me in that space. I just try not to be too inappropriate.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity? Something within the realm of design or dressing that feels innately Australian? \r\n\t \r\nI think there’s a colour palette that is quintessentially Australian and an aesthetic expansivity that can only be a result of our spacious terrain. I think we embrace colour and comfort, which translates into a laid back approachability.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style?\r\n\t \r\nAggressive pattern clashing, considering silhouettes and absolute embracing of colour.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you ‘can’t do without’?\r\n\t \r\nI’m fairly transient with clothes. There are a few pieces that I keep coming back to season after season- a heavy, vintage, embroidered jacket with faux fur collar that we affectionately refer to as “the couch” and my collection of flared pants that I make from ridiculous fabrics. My day bag (when not painting) is a printed Ganni tote, and my cross-body green Gucci still seems the most appropriate bag from most evening ensembles these days. So, in short, there’s probably 10-15 pieces I can’t do without, and these will likely be different next season.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is inspiring your world at this moment?\r\n\t \r\nColour-wise, I’m obsessing over warm hues; terracotta, rust, nude, apricot. Perhaps it’s a reaction to this endless cold weather or the collective interior aesthetic, which is heading in this direction (and has been for some time- I take a while to cotton on). I’m also exploring super large scale abstracts inspired by Brancusian shapes and a feeling of lazy Mediterranean afternoons as well as large cropped florals- loose and textural. Sonically I’m loving Ngaiire’s new album and, slightly more embarrassingly, the Vivo soundtrack. Lin-Manuel Miranda is a genius.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t“The idea that perfection is the enemy opened up a light and enjoyable way of creating for me. Knowing that accidents or mistakes are what give an artwork character was incredibly freeing. It meant that I could create (and live) courageously, knowing that everything is just problem-solving. Nothing is futile.”  \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me a little about your relationship with the natural world.\r\n\t \r\nI often forget about nature. I literally have visual diaries from when I was younger saying, “I forgot about nature”. I’m a workaholic who’s addicted to productivity, so I rarely carve out time to just be in nature. Having kids helps with that as you’re often doing something out in the elements. We just bought a farm down south, so there’s much more time walking through paddocks, finding animal bones.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live?\r\n\t \r\nWe live in South Fremantle, which we love. We also have two small children, so our day usually starts anywhere between 5-6 am, which is either a brutal beginning or a luxurious sleep-in depending on where it falls on that scale. I work four days a week, and my husband and I share the school drop off and pickups, so I usually get around 6 hours of work in on most days. These vary between adult-like-admin such as quoting on jobs, putting together proposals, general website upkeep, editing images and my painting days, where I disappear into my own world and try not to partake in too much rational behaviour. I find, more than ever, it’s important to really separate these mindsets as they’re two completely different humans that are non-transferable. After school, I have to play anywhere between 2 and 12 games of UNO with Harry and usually a dance or tea party with Luella. Then I drink two glasses of Chardonnay while I watch my husband cook dinner and discuss whether it’s food reactions or the current moon that is making our kids crazy. I bathe the kids, Ross cleans the kitchen, kids are in bed by 7 pm, and we retire to tv and chocolate on the couch. Bedtime is around 9 pm. Rosco and I share all the parenting and house roles fairly evenly, which I love.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDescribe your workspace – where is it located, and what do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?\r\n\t \r\nI’m at the Pakenham St Artist Studios in Fremantle, which is not unlike a large prison cell with high windows and the occasional pigeon. I’ve been there for ten years now, so I know how to ride out the icy winters and oven-like summers. My studio is generally a total mess which sometimes helps and sometimes hinders my process. I need something inspiring in my ears to start painting- an album I’m obsessed with or a movie that moves me. Then I’ll usually move onto something slightly trashier for the afternoon. It’s like an afternoon treat to myself when I’m less energetic and just want to be entertained.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Anya Brock is an Australian painter who has quickly gained notoriety for her spirited and bold use of colour and strokes. Effervescent, pragmatic and unreserved, Anya is a woman who contains multitudes. Her energy is contagious and flows through her painted works which are recognisably figurative without entering realism. She identifies strongly with the abstract expressionists of 1950's America. A self-proclaimed hermit, Anya has perfected the balance of planting her feet in reality while keeping her head in the clouds. Anya lives in South Fremantle with her husband and two children and dedicates her life to her family and art. And a short description of her personal style has us wanting to raid her wardrobe. Speaking with Anya reminds us to take risks, be bold, and embrace wonder in our daily lives.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1673, 1678, 1676, 1674]","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Artist in Residence: Anya Brock","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/189090040-290166886103403-3169482135244637754-n.jpg?t=1631003787"},"title":"Artist in Residence: Anya Brock","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/artist-in-residence-anya-brock/"}
Artist in Residence: Anya Brock

Artist in Residence: Anya Brock

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"27th Aug 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Ken Leung\r\n\r\n\tIn the lead-up to our WeWearAustralia 2021 campaign launch, Showroom-X Founder Richard Poulson and seasoned creative visionary Ken Leung met to discuss brand purpose and the Japanese concept of ‘ikigai’ or ‘reason for being’. Ken Leung has over 20 years of experience creating the visual language of global brands, including DKNY, 3.1 Phillip Lim, and is responsible for elevating Uniqlo to a global audience in his role as creative director. Ken has an extensive background in inspiring and empowering multi-disciplinary creative teams to produce unique, innovative and engaging brand experiences. Who better to share their knowledge with the Australian Retail Round Table - a meeting of minds that first gathered as an antidote to the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020. This forum provides a virtual meeting place to share stories, advice, support and bolster the retail community. Above all else, it serves as a reminder that we are all in this together and are capable of mutually uplifting all those who are part of the Australian fashion industry. We were so lucky to have Ken Leung join us to discuss ikigai, the intersection where your passions and talent converge with the things that the world needs and is willing to pay for. Ken reminded us all that we each have a purpose, higher than profit and short-term gain. The best won success synchronously uplifts your community, respects the planet, and puts authenticity first.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tYou're a Perth boy. What brings you back?  \r\n\t The nexus of coming back was to renew my U.S. work visa for Uniqlo. And after being here for four months, my family loved it so much, we decided to stay, and I'm not going back. So I’m officially the former Creative Director of Uniqlo.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"I'm taking a look at this      \r\n\tJapanese concept of ikigai\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\"your reason for being\r\n\t\r\n\tand reason to get up\r\n\t\r\n\t every morning.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nYou've worked in creative design for your entire professional career for some of the biggest brands in the world. We're here to talk about ikigai; Your reason for being in the context of branding, and how your reason for being relates to your brand.  \r\n\t It's the whole reason for me moving back to Perth. I had to re-evaluate my career and the lifestyle choices I've been making based around my career. I'm taking a look at this Japanese concept of ikigai: your reason for being and reason to get up every morning. It's what drives you as a person - your purpose. I've been looking at how I want to live my life moving forward. I've lived overseas for almost 20 years, in busy, the very work driven cities of London and New York. I've done work that I'm incredibly proud of. I've had amazing opportunities, but now the opportunity is here for me to shape my life and what I want to prioritise and what kind of work I want to do. That's my ikigai at the moment. And how that relates to brand purpose - It's about taking the time to sit and consider what you stand for as a brand.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tAnd I'm sure there are a lot of people on the other side of the call who are feeling like it's groundhog day and thinking about what they want out of their lives. Did you feel as if your life was out of balance before moving back here? \r\n\t \r\nI definitely did. In 2019, I had a new place in New York, and from August to November, I only slept there for three nights because I was always on the road. That continued during the pandemic. I was on endless zoom calls, especially with Uniqlo. If you could see my alarm list, there were calls every 10 minutes through the night because I was on New York hours. It overtook my life and took its mental toll.  It really made me think about how I want to live my life, where I want to spend most of my time, and how I want to work as efficiently and creatively as possible.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell us a little about your career arc up until now... \r\n\t \r\nMy most recent role was as the global creative director for Uniqlo. I was overseeing all the luxury collaborations, from Jil Sander, JW Anderson, to Marimekko. It was a global role, and I had teams reporting to me from Paris, Shanghai, New York and Portland. Prior to that, I was at DKNY, where my role was to relaunch the brand and bring back its relevance from the 90s when it was in the ultimate urban, cool New York label. I oversaw the creative, advertising, runway shows. We did this runway show on the High Line, where we took over the meatpacking district and created a futuristic vision of New York. Before that, I was at Phillip Lim for six years. That was my first job in fashion. I went to New York, convinced Phillip to move me over from London, and then started the in-house branding team. I had the luxury of working alongside Phillip for six years and helped craft the vision of that brand. I really learned fashion on the job. Before that, I was in the magazine industry.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tBeyond a more balanced lifestyle, what motivates you to stay here in Australia?\r\n\t \r\nMy idea behind ikigai is to use my background, creativity, and connections to elevate my community - Perth, Western Australia, Australia. I can empathise with those of you in fashion retail at the moment. I know it's a tough time. We were in the same position all through 2020 during the pandemic in America. There is a light at the end of the tunnel, and retail did come back stronger. The brands who took time to re-evaluate the messaging and efficiencies of their business seem to be coming out stronger. I want to work with Australian brands and help them scale and represent Australia in the best way possible.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWe're very lucky to have you back on Australian soil! What do you think modern customers are looking for from brands?\r\n\t \r\nGlobally, modern customers are overwhelmed by choice. The things I've seen in the states and certainly here in Australia that have resonated with customers is when they find that emotional connection. That emotional connection is built with brands that stand for something. For example, a brand like Patagonia is very clear about what they stand for, such as their emphasis on sustainability, and they put this cause before profit. When you choose another brand that isn't communicating their brand purpose as well, they can't stand up to Patagonia.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhy is brand purpose important?\r\n\t \r\nFirstly, brand purpose is important for self-motivation, to drive yourself and your team towards a cause larger than profit. And secondly, smart consumers need an emotional connection with your brand beyond the product and a logo. I find that with the brands I work with, we need to define that brand purpose so that it's a clear message to the customer.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat steps can brands take to create authentic messaging around their brand purpose?\r\n\t \r\nDefining an authentic brand purpose beyond making a product starts with leaders asking themselves, \"why do we exist?\" and inspiring alignment from everyone in the team. You need to hire smart people that authentically align with your purpose. Every team member needs to live and breathe your purpose authentically. This will then transfer outwards to the customer. Finally, you also need to think about how you are communicating your purpose to your customer. Keep messaging simple. Maintain confidence in what you stand for. Try not to lose sight of the bigger picture in pursuit of short term profit.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t“Finally, you also need to think about how you are communicating your purpose to your customer. Keep messaging simple. Maintain confidence in what you stand for. Try not to lose sight of the bigger picture in pursuit of short term profit.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWho are some brands doing it right?\r\n\t \r\nWe talked about Patagonia. Other brands who are doing well out of this cause - I would say Stella McCartney. They have very clear messaging. Tesla, for instance, are doing very well. It's clear to the world what this company stands for, love them or hate them. It's almost like the cult of Tesla.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tYou worked with MoMA and The Lourve with Uniqlo. How does the art world differ from fashion?\r\n\t \r\nThe brand purpose of Uniqlo is to make quality clothing democratic. The tagline was 'made for all', which is intended to infiltrate all our communication. Working with MOMA and Louvre was an idea to democratise art. In a sense, it's just a different creative expression but making it more accessible to a public who may see it as intimidating. In terms of how the art world works, they have freedom of expression, but fashion needs more of a purpose. It needs to be driven towards more of a consumer need.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat role do you think brick and mortar stores play today?\r\n\t \r\nI think it's still important. Clothing, there's such a tactility to it. The fabric, details, you can try to capture as much as possible. You talk about the emotional connection to the customer. Of course, you can get that at some level through digital, but that emotional connection comes through human contact. How you're greeted by store staff, how it smells, how they talk to you and explain their knowledge of clothes with the touch of the fabric - you can see the craftsmanship that goes into it better in the store. I think it's a balance. A lot of people say that brick and mortar is on the way out, but I think it's just a matter of finding that balance and what works for whatever you produce.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat does the future of the industry look like to you?\r\n\t \r\nFor me, my hope, I think we produce way too many products right now. I hope we become more efficient and more measured in our quantities and the way that we produce. I know personally, out of the pandemic, I am approaching life with a less is more, and better quality is more mindset. I hope we're not so driven by this relentless pursuit of the new in fashion and that we choose more investment pieces that are timeless. I know that fashion is driven by the seasons, but I do hope that some change can come. The pace is too relentless right now. And I hope we can find a way to slow down and take a more measured approach to fashion.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tAround the east coast of Australia, there are all these snap shutdowns. Was this the case in the US? And what can we learn from that in order to safeguard our retail spaces and our retail sector?\r\n\t \r\nI was in New York, and I was also working with markets around the world. New York was shut down for pretty much March through to July and then started to scale their store hours up slowly. I understand that on the East Coast, it's challenging to plan. We didn't have that experience in New York. It was a flat shutdown, and once stores were given the green light to reopen, they were able to remain open. Once they opened again, retail sales went through the roof for those who were able to weather the storm. Because consumers weren't able to spend their money, they went out in droves. We saw that in Asia too. In China, when the Hermes store reopened, it did a record first day, a couple of million. And the same went for Uniqlo there. Hopefully, it's the same in Australia, and the customers will all come back once it reopens. But with everything changing so rapidly, I understand how hard it is.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWas there anything you learned during the pandemic that Australian brands may be able to use to help support their businesses during lockdowns?\r\n\t \r\nI would imagine people at home are more engaged with social media. I know I personally was engaging with brands and learning a lot of things about the industry when I wasn't able to go into the office. There is an opportunity to engage with more customers through thoughtful content and telling them different parts of your brand story. And it doesn't need to be a huge investment in creating content. You can do it very nimbly. I learned during the lockdown that a lot of the things that we were doing before, we can do a lot more efficiently, cost and speed wise. You don't need that full production we thought we did. We ironed out a lot of inefficiencies.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDuring your experiences working across the world, did you see the industry coming together to collaborate and support each other during the pandemic?\r\n\t \r\nIn New York, we didn't get government assistance. The US government do things their own way. Due to that lack of support, everyone had to band together. That kind of group, shared community mentality was something positive that came out of it. It was across all industries, in fashion and definitely in hospitality and restaurants, people were pulling together to keep each other motivated and support each other emotionally and with exposure to help with sales.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nHow can brands better engage their audience?\r\n\t \r\nIn the US, I'm seeing many brands engaging their customers and asking for their feedback on product. That consumer engagement, where the consumer feels like they are part of and have a voice in the brand, is incalculable. There is a brand in the US called glossier, owned by Emily Whyte, and she has been really good at speaking directly to the customer via socials to talk about what products people are missing. It really engages the consumer and makes them feel like they are part of the brand, and the brand becomes a living thing with back and forth communication.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nHow can we uplift the Australian fashion industry at this time?\r\n\t \r\nWell, here we are now, people from all parts of our industry, coming together. We have, right now, a community of people sharing each other's content and making sure people are aware of each other's brands.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nHow can we uplift the Australian fashion industry at this time?\r\n\t \r\nWell, here we are now, people from all parts of our industry, coming together. We have, right now, a community of people sharing each other's content and making sure people are aware of each other's brands.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWave Photo by @ryanmurphystudio\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        In the lead-up to our #WeWearAustralia 2021 campaign launch, Showroom-X Founder Richard Poulson and seasoned creative visionary Ken Leung met to discuss brand purpose and the Japanese concept of ‘ikigai’ or ‘reason for being’. Ken Leung has over 20 years of experience creating the visual language of global brands, including DKNY, 3.1 Phillip Lim, and is responsible for elevating Uniqlo to a global audience in his role as creative director.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Conversation with Ken Leung - Minutes of Meeting","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/ken-and-rich.jpeg?t=1629962662"},"title":"Conversation with Ken Leung - Minutes of Meeting","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/conversation-with-ken-leung-minutes-of-meeting/"}
Conversation with Ken Leung - Minutes of Meeting

Conversation with Ken Leung - Minutes of Meeting

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"27th Aug 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Young Blood\r\n\r\n\tFor the newest injection into our Art Annex, we have gathered four of Australia’s up and coming artists to discuss their works, daily pleasures and the places they’re finding inspiration. While talking with these young Australians, each spoke to an undercurrent of intensified creative energy and collaboration in our country. One of the by-products of this challenging period in history has been a collective craving for art and beauty in the home, and these artists are answering the call. \r\n\tSaxon Quinn, Giorgia Bel, Milly Dent, and Giorgia McRae all spoke of increased time spent idly, with room to explore ideas and expand their perspectives. It was Einstein who said, “The monotony and solitude of a quiet life stimulates the creative mind.” The current landscape of our country has our artists from Saint Cloche finding beauty in the everyday; long walks, plants poking between concrete, bubblegum littered footpaths, and resoundingly, music.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            Each artist embraces the      \r\n\ttactile nature of their practice\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tFinding beauty\r\n\t\r\n\tin the\r\n\t\r\n\t everyday\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nWhat do you need around you to feel creatively motivated? \r\nSaxon Quinn: Music. I’ve been getting into some older stuff lately. I find music a great way to get the balance of works created, working with negative space and the positioning of details.\r\n\r\nGiorgia Bel: I can’t think of a time when I haven’t had music on. Softly or loudly, it’s there. \r\n\r\nMilly Dent:\r\nA clean space, the right tools, some music and a clear mind.\r\n\r\nGiorgia McRae:\r\nI need my studio to be clear… or at least not chaotic.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tSAXON QUINN \r\n\t Saxon is an emerging artist from Melbourne. Each one of Saxon’s works created for Showroom-X tie into his signature aesthetics - the use of cement, strays and texture. These elements tie together with the calming use of balance and placement. The ‘Fall Apart Together’ series explores the idea of finding strength in each other's weaknesses. Saxon’s work takes a cue from the asphalt sprawl streetscapes of our cities.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you best describe your art practice?\r\n\t \r\nAbstract, brutalist, wabi-sabi. Much of my art is focused around being within the urban landscape – in particular, the cement material of our concrete jungles. Works represent the scarred, coarse-aggregate pavements, and walls found throughout cities and towns;  from children scribbling in chalk on suburban bitumen streets to tagged walls and bubblegum littered footpaths downtown.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you to this practice? Did you always want to be an artist?\r\n\t \r\nMy mother is an artist and works with texture in a lot of her work. I grew up surrounded by art and always knew that I would end up creating works in some medium.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it? \r\n\t \r\nI love the fact that it allows me to escape and reset. I’m generally quite anxious and always on the go, but when I paint, I am able to relax and focus on painting alone.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape? Do you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity?\r\n\t \r\nI like the fact that creatives from all walks of life can get together and collaborate on projects. I’ve found that local artists have been very approachable when it comes to sharing knowledge and experiences.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWho are your idols?\r\n\t \r\nMum. She has a neverending positive attitude and is always sharing down knowledge. She’s the life of the party. People blossom around her.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\tGIORGIA BEL\r\n\t \r\nGiorgia Bel is a self-taught artist who predominantly works with acrylic and oil-based paint. She began playing with paint and sketch five years ago, aspiring to simply create beauty from a darker place of ill health & recovery. Giorgia uses colour and texture to create depth in her works which focus on imagined and seen landscapes, undersea-scapes and the human form.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you best describe your art practice?\r\n\t \r\nMy art practice is my medicine, my meditation. I go, I wander in my mind, and I begin. The practice is not careful, my hand is free, and I sketch rough lines and start to fill in; colours over colours, layering, in textured strokes. It’s not a formal practice that I have learnt. It’s just exactly what I feel.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you to this practice? Did you always want to be an artist?\r\n\t \r\nI wanted to be a designer or an architect. I studied this but fell ill in my early twenties, putting a halt to my first years of working. My doctor told me to paint to help still my mind. I couldn’t do much at the time, so I took the advice and picked up a brush. I didn’t like it much at first, but I found rest in it. Ultimately it helped me heal. It is a great love of my life.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?\r\n\t \r\nI am lucky enough to be in a studio that is surrounded by plants. I walk through the alley often when taking a break to stretch. This is really stimulating.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat or who is currently inspiring your world?\r\n\t \r\nI’m taking long walks being in lockdown. Using my camera to capture specks of colour I see in the path or a flower that stands out. The rocks and crashing water at the beach. There is so much to stimulate your mind as you step out of the house.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\tMILLY DENT\r\n\t \r\nMilly Dent is a Sydney based ceramic artist. Milly reimagines everyday routines through uniquely handcrafted, exclusive ceramic works, underlied with the philosophy of creating pieces that are both utilitarian and sculptural. In her body of work for Showroom X, Milly uses white porcelain stained with black pigments to create a statement series of wares which fire to a beautiful black graphite colour, a wonderful contrast to any white space in which they sit.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you best describe your art practice?\r\n\t \r\nMy evolving collections are a continued study of the intimate, tangible and ever-challenging nature of porcelain. Learning from its history as well as new processes to create innovative, interesting work.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it? \r\n\t \r\nThere is something so rewarding about crafting an object from essentially nothing with your hands. Porcelain has many wonderful qualities that draw me in, including the whiteness, the translucency and the vitrified-stoney feel once fired, as well as the soft, malleable, gentle feel of the unfired material.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nAre there any Australian designers you love?\r\n\t \r\nYes! Lots! Clever friends such as Evi O, Pip Stent, Tara Burke and Claire Johnson.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWho are your idols?\r\n\t \r\nMy creative friends!\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat or who is currently inspiring your world?\r\n\t \r\nThe ocean. It’s refreshing, humbling and best of all, inspiring.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\tGIORGIA MCRAE\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\tGiorgia McRae is a multi-disciplinary artist based in Sydney. The series of drawings she has created for Showroom-X is an ode to balance and weight, and how we need both to keep grounded in our daily lives. She explores both sculpture and drawing and has created a playful relationship between the two mediums. There is a nod to yin and yang in her work, and the beauty in simplicity, which is ever present in these pastels.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nHow would you best describe your art practice?\r\n\t \r\nI like to think that my work is part abstract, modernist, and cubist plus a little Art Deco and a little Bauhaus – I’m maybe a little greedy with that mouthful. My process is intuitive, so each line, shape, and colour will influence the next. I don’t think I’ve ever known how one of my pieces was going to turn out - which is sometimes a blessing and sometimes a curse depending on the end result.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat drew you to this practice? Did you always want to be an artist?\r\n\t \r\nStrangely enough, I always thought that I’d be a ceramicist – But almost straight away, drawing took on a life of its own. The ‘drawn’ sculptures were impossible, without bases, just floating in space.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat do you enjoy about it? \r\n\t \r\nSo many things! But if I had to pick one, it would have to be creating a composition that works. It’s always such a wonderful moment when you feel your mind go ‘yup, that’s enough, that’s finished.’ Or even the feeling of being on the clear road to that feeling.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape? Do you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity?\r\n\t \r\nIt feels like there’s a nice little hum of excitement and creativity in the air – maybe because we’ve been in and out of lockdowns and people are spending money on things that will make their houses feel beautiful instead of on travel? If I’m completely honest, I’ve also quite enjoyed being able to lock myself away in my studio during the latest lockdown. It will be so nice to see what we’ve all been working on when this is all over.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat or who is currently inspiring your world?\r\n\t \r\nOh gosh, so many artists. Le Corbusier, Joan Miro, Helen Frankenthaler, Alexander Calder, Mark Rothko, Jean-Michel Basquiat – the list could go on forever.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        For the newest injection into our Art Annex, we have gathered four of Australia’s up and coming artists to discuss their works, daily pleasures and the places they’re finding inspiration. While talking with these young Australians, each spoke to an undercurrent of intensified creative energy and collaboration in our country.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1701, 1702, 1703, 1700,1705,1706,1707]","tags":[{"name":"portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Artist In Residence - The Collective","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/artist-in-residence-collective-banner.jpg?t=1630044451"},"title":"Artist In Residence - The Collective","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/artist-in-residence-the-collective/"}
Artist In Residence - The Collective

Artist In Residence - The Collective

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"12th Aug 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"STRATEAS CARLUCCI\r\n\r\n\tHailing from Melbourne, Australia, STRATEAS CARLUCCI is a creative collaboration between Peter Strateas and Mario-Luca Carlucci. Founded in 2013, the label quickly garnered impressive accolades for its expertly constructed designs where structure, texture and fabric are of the utmost importance. While Peter and Mario-Luca remain highly focused on the principles of design, they know that fashion has a cultural significance that extends beyond aesthetics. Their vision expanded into creating designs for men and women that are both timeless and subversive. Each garment has hand-crafted elements, contributing to the structured, minimalist aesthetic of the designs, which unite with subtle references to underground subcultures and art movements.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nMeeting with Peter and Mario-Luca to discuss their designs feels more akin to speaking with conceptual artists. The label is fascinated by duality and the merging of binary opposites, particularly art and design and masculinity and femininity, creating collections led by a concept. Working in a small team, they are able to remain highly reactive to conversations and questions surrounding the industry and have attracted an audience who “won’t compromise quality over cost, who are curious about the processes involved, and the creative, conceptual storytelling behind each garment.” Through their thoughtful design and art series, they can live with the questions, actively seeking solutions and new modes of operating in the world to activate the minds and spirits of their audience and beyond.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nThe STRATEAS CARLUCCI studio is always buzzing and busy. Mario-Luca has two children, River, aged 4, and Ryder, aged 10, who spends days after school involved in little projects (we have heard rumblings of a new kids line!). They also have their studio pup, Raf, roaming the floor, creating a familial, happy mix alongside their small and close-knit team. STRATEAS CARLUCCI is more of a lifestyle of Mario-Luca and Peter, so it always includes their private worlds, with the personal and the professional feeding into each other. We are lucky to have shared a conversation with the two designers to discuss their practice of finding new mediums, perspectives and solutions to employ and express through the creation of their bold yet enduring designs.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tHow would you best describe what you do professionally?  \r\n\t We’d best describe ourselves as creatives. Although the main medium we work with is fashion, and the tangible element of that is garments, it’s much more than that for us. Like any art form, there is a deep conceptual component to our work, which lives beyond the physical garments. The research and storytelling combined with the cross-design disciplines, including art and design, are found in many shapes and forms.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"If a garment hasn't been thoughtfully designed,     \r\n\tethically produced  and consciously sourced...\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"It is most likely \r\n\t\r\n\tnot going to \r\n\tstand the test\r\n\t\r\n\tof time.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nWhat drew you to fashion design? What do you enjoy about it?  \r\n\t We found that fashion allows us the freedom to explore both the conceptual and the commercial. It allows us to investigate many different ideas and concepts, as each season almost acts as a new project, where we can build on past concepts or explore new ideas. Fashion is a fast-paced industry, and we like challenging ourselves each season and developing new ways of working, including new techniques and technologies. It’s not stagnant, making it exciting and challenging, always allowing room for growth and development.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires you professionally?\r\n\t \r\nProfessionally, you face many challenges in this industry, so what inspires us is the pursuit of bettering ourselves and our brand. This includes being agile, adapting to the ever-changing industry, and learning to grow and accept change.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live? What does a typical day look like for you?\r\n\t \r\nWe live and work in Melbourne, which is a very inspiring city to be as a creative. You are surrounded by other like-minded creatives, and there is a thriving cultural and arts scene. Our studio is based in Brunswick East, and our building was once a hosiery manufacturer, so there’s a link and history to the fashion and textile industry. Our team is small, and we spend most of our days multitasking and working on multiple projects, from new collection development to production, shoot planning, concept building and research. It’s a great environment to work in. We are fortunate enough to have lots of space with beautiful natural light. We manufacture all our collections in Melbourne and develop everything in-house.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape?\r\n\t \r\nAustralia has really become a major international contender when it comes to all things creative. From fashion, art, music, food and wine, design in general – Australia is certainly pushing boundaries and taking charge. We love being included in that and sharing our story. There are so many talented creatives in Australia. Personally, it seemed for a while that perhaps Australia was shadowed by other major markets like Europe and the USA, however over the past decade, it seems we are now breaking through and making our mark.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity? Something within the realm of design or dressing that feels innately Australian?\r\n\t \r\nWe believe that the ‘Australian attitude’ is the common thread. In Australia, the overall attitude feels more wholesome and relaxed. There is a value placed on having a work/life balance, and we pride ourselves on being caring, mindful and collaborative. No matter what aesthetic your brand or what style or categories you make, our collective attitude remains the same and reflects in all our work.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style?\r\n\t \r\nWe dress minimal, comfortable and almost always in black. We love textiles and surface design, so although garments may be black, they will always be textured. We enjoy mixing and matching styles, from a simple tailored pant, a pair of sneakers, or a quality tailored jacket, worn over a cotton baggy pleat pant. Our aim is to make garments that suit the modern wardrobe, have a classic sensibility and last the test of time. With that in mind, we love mixing past collection favourites with some new additions.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you ‘can’t do without’?\r\n\t \r\nFor Peter, it would be his classic tailored Proto Blazer. He wears a version of this almost on the daily. For Mario-Luca, it’s the baggy pleated pant. Again, he owns multiple versions and wears them religiously.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat does luxury mean to you? \r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Luxury is time. Spend it wisely and concisely. Don’t waste it. The same mantra is applied to fashion.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me a little about Strateas Carlucci. What motivated you to start the label?\r\n\t \r\nSTRATEAS CARLUCCI was born organically and has grown organically over the years. We simply wanted to make beautiful collections, collaborate with amazing creatives and explore and push personal and creative boundaries.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWho do you design for? \r\n\t \r\nWe design for a customer who appreciates locally, ethically and consciously made products of quality. Those who won’t compromise quality over cost, who are curious about the processes involved, and the creative, conceptual storytelling behind each garment. They care for the planet and the people who occupy it and love great fashion.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is your approach to design? How do you make a garment or accessory timeless? And lasting?\r\n\t \r\nWe tend to steer clear of trends and design our collections based off fundamental wardrobe essentials. Although we make new collections each season, you will find it’s like a continuation from one to the next. Good design, to us, will last the test of time, both physically in its quality and construction, and in its appearance. Fit and form are essential to this process, so we put in a lot of work to ensure garments fit how they are supposed to and are constructed in the best way, without compromise.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tAre the majority of your pieces designed to be unisex? \r\n\t \r\nWhen we design a collection, we begin with a concept. The collections are not driven by gender and categories; therefore, we think of this from a holistic approach. We have always championed the idea of genderless clothing, as it’s made for everyone. You will find most of our items are shot and styled on all genders, male, female and non-binary.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tYou produce everything ethically and locally in Melbourne. \r\n\t \r\nSince the brand’s inception, we have made 100% of our collections in Melbourne, working with local and accredited manufacturers. We love the idea of supporting and working with our local community. We are fortunate enough to still have some amazing and talented manufacturers in Melbourne, ranging in all kinds of specialised areas, from tailoring to knitwear, jerseys and more. We have built great relationships with our collaborators over the years, and they have become an extension of our team.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat are some changes you’ve noted in the fashion industry in recent times?  \r\n\t \r\nCustomers are much savvier and more researched nowadays, which has put a lot of much-welcomed pressure on the fashion industry. There are ongoing conversations around sustainability, ethical production, diversity in the industry, image diversity, gender equality and general transparency on how brands operate. Fashion brands are now being held accountable and scrutinised, which has opened up the conversation around these topics and makes it harder for larger corporations to hide. We are supportive of all these changes, and we know that we, too, have a long way to go. Being a small team, we are able to listen to these conversations and comments, some of which are directed to us from our customers, others that are general topics, and can take action and make changes where needed.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nYou’re also exploring the re-use and repurposing of deadstock and fashion waste in a series of non-fashion experiments called “Art-Series”. What ideas or issues does this series aim to explore?\r\n\t \r\nFashion for us is more than just a garment or finished product. It’s the concept and idea behind it. We explore other design disciplines to help us visually articulate these concepts, and over the years, have created a body of work called ‘Art-Series’. We aim to use deadstock fabric remnants in the majority of our collections, and we also have a zero-waste policy in our studio. If we can’t re-use the garments or fabrics in the collection for whatever reason (sometimes damaged, or off-cuts which would be considered waste), we include these in our Art-Series to help highlight a particular issue or message. We’ve explored concepts around sustainability in what we call ‘Co-Exist’.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nOh yes. I did read on your site - you describe it as a place “Where nature and civilisation live in harmony”. What are some pieces you’ve created under that banner? \r\n\t \r\nIn one instance, we buried biodegradable wool products and watched these decompose over time via a timelapse. In another instance, we did a shoot with native Australian flora intertwined with some vegan leather garments, highlighting the idea of fashion and nature living in harmony. In a series we called ‘Fab-briquette’, we made fabric sculptures constructed from waste. This is something we are hoping to continue to grow and evolve.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Hailing from Melbourne, Australia, STRATEAS CARLUCCI is a creative collaboration between Peter Strateas and Mario-Luca Carlucci. Founded in 2013, the label quickly garnered impressive accolades for its expertly constructed designs where structure, texture and fabric are of the utmost importance. While Peter and Mario-Luca remain highly focused on the principles of design, they know that fashion has a cultural significance that extends beyond aesthetics. Their vision expanded into creating designs for men and women that are both timeless and subversive. Each garment has hand-crafted elements, contributing to the structured, minimalist aesthetic of the designs, which unite with subtle references to underground subcultures and art movements.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1614, 1615, 1616, 1617, 1638, 1639]","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Strateas Carlucci","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/screen-shot-2021-08-12-at-10.17.12-am.png?t=1628739106"},"title":"Strateas Carlucci","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/strateas-carlucci/"}
Strateas Carlucci

Strateas Carlucci

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"3rd Aug 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Sarah-Jane Clarke\r\n\r\n\tSarah-Jane Clarke designs clothes with a sense of simplicity and awareness. She is widely recognised for co-founding and helming sass & bide, but her self-titled label, Sarah-Jane Clarke, has maintained our attention for the last five years. Growing up, SJ’s family uprooted their lives for a new home every 8-10 years. She quickly adopted her parent’s love for exploring and being immersed in experiences that broadened her field of vision and now welcomes change, having moved from city to farm to island and back again. It comes as no surprise that everything Sarah-Jane creates is informed by a profound love and respect for the natural world and an appreciation for the dedicated craftsmanship employed in quality artisanal artifacts across the globe. These elements combined conjured a vision for her most recent capsule titled Travel Wardrobe, a spirited collection crafted in luxurious, natural fabrications with a minimal footprint. SJ now lives in Sydney’s beautiful Watsons Bay with her partner and three sons and keeps grounded with daily swims in the harbour. In conversation with SJ, we discussed her work as a fashion designer, wellness and mindset coach and all that has inspired the life and work of this effervescent and wise woman.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tTell me a little about your upbringing. What is your family like?  \r\n\t Mum and Dad were not only self-employed. They worked together. Our dinner table conversations were often centred around the ups and downs of operating your own business. Believe it or not, they’re still married after 55 years, and they’re currently travelling around Australia for one year. My mum definitely sparked my life-long interest in health and wellbeing. She is well-read and offers a different viewpoint to the traditional Western schools of thought. We now spend hours discussing ideas, sharing tips, and swapping helpful books we’ve discovered.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"Luxury means having time      \r\n\tto enjoy the things you love.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"Australian style  \r\n\t\r\n\tis centred\r\n\ton ease.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nHow would you best describe what you do professionally?  \r\n\t I help people feel good about themselves and strive to be better, whether through design or personal coaching.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you to fashion design? \r\n\t \r\nI was always drawn to the power of fashion, how fabric and colour can change your mood and uplift your spirits.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it? \r\n\t \r\nI’m such a visual person, and textiles and colours are definitely my favourite part of the designing process. Seeing a well-designed and constructed garment (inside-and-out) come to fruition is so pleasurable.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires you professionally?\r\n\t \r\nI’m perpetually inspired by travel – it truly makes my heart sing. Whether soaking up the sunshine in the balmy Northern Hemisphere summer or exploring the hidden gems of Australia, experiencing new surroundings and perspectives fills me with so much creative motivation.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live?\r\n\t \r\nI live in Sydney’s beautiful Watsons Bay with Daniel, my partner of almost 18 years, and our three sons.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat does a typical day look like for you?\r\n\t \r\nMy mornings consist of getting my three sons off to school, exercising myself and the dogs before walking the five minutes from my home to my studio. I’ll usually have a swim in the harbour, chat to the locals over coffee, do some work and end the day with a home-cooked dinner with the family. Repeat.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape?\r\n\t \r\nAustralia has such an incredible breadth of talent across all creative mediums. Our geographical location gives us a unique perspective, meaning our artistic process is often shaped or inspired by the landscape and our innate isolation.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“I love some of the emerging artists who are currently having their moment and exploring the nuanced ways the past year has impacted the world around them and their artistic output.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity? Something within the realm of design or dressing that feels innately Australian?\r\n\t \r\nAustralian style is centred on ease. This doesn’t mean it’s not chic, elegant, or refined; rather, it’s unfussy and liberating. And I think this sense of ease permeates not only our wardrobes but many other aspects of local design and creativity.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style?\r\n\t \r\nElegantly dishevelled.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you ‘can’t do without’?\r\n\t \r\nI live in the SJC Maluku blouse. It’s the ultimate trans-seasonal essential.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDescribe your approach to beauty and wellness...\r\n\t \r\nWhen we feel good, mentally and physically, we can navigate life with grace. It’s important to have an awareness about what aspects in life (diet, habits, behaviours and friendships) make you feel empowered and what aspects steal your energy and power.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat does luxury mean to you? \r\n\t \r\nTime. Luxury means having time to enjoy the things you love, whether that’s taking time to dress well, travelling to far-flung places or finding a quiet place to read a book.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me a little about Sarah-Jane Clarke. Your most recent capsule collection is called ‘Travel Wardrobe’. When international travel is on pause, what did you want your customer to get out of this collection?\r\n\t \r\nCapsule 5 is a considered extension of Capsule 4. It consists of pieces that evoke joy and allow us the freedom to celebrate the simple things in life.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat are some changes you’ve noted in the fashion industry in recent times? \r\n\t \r\nThe fashion industry has changed so much since I co-owned sass & bide, definitely for the better. We have so much more awareness about how the actions of both individuals and businesses affect the planet and its people, and it’s great to see that we are taking responsibility and working together to create a better future.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat is your approach to tackling sustainability? \r\n\t \r\nSJC creates small capsule collections out of natural fibres designed to leave minimal environmental footprints and crafted to be loved and appreciated for life. We source our fabrics responsibly, seeking organic or recycled fibres, and when possible, we work with remnant fabrics. We also rigorously vet our manufacturing partners, ensuring they prioritise the fair treatment and wellbeing of their employees. SJC uses biodegradable shipping bags, and we partner with Shippit and Australia Post for carbon-neutral delivery services. No one is perfect, but I do believe we can each take small steps towards having a positive impact on people and our planet.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat or who is currently inspiring your world at the moment? \r\n\t \r\nI am inspired by the artist Wayne Pate, particularly the colours that he uses in his works (I love his stripe series). I’m also a huge fan of world music – I have a playlist currently on repeat curated by Dan Lywood (the founder of Playlister) as a ‘thank you for hosting’ gift, following a lunch we had at our boatshed.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nDescribe your workspace – where is it located, and what do you need around you to feel creatively motivated? \r\n\t \r\nFor my creativity to flourish, I must be surrounded by streams of sunshine, fresh flowers, gentle music and a hit of coffee.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Sarah-Jane Clarke designs clothes with a sense of simplicity and awareness. She is widely recognised for co-founding and helming sass & bide, but her self-titled label, Sarah-Jane Clarke, has maintained our attention for the last five years. Growing up, SJ’s family uprooted their lives for a new home every 8-10 years. She quickly adopted her parent’s love for exploring and being immersed in experiences that broadened her field of vision and now welcomes change, having moved from city to farm to island and back again. It comes as no surprise that everything Sarah-Jane creates is informed by a profound love and respect for the natural world and an appreciation for the dedicated craftsmanship employed in quality artisanal artifacts across the globe. These elements combined conjured a vision for her most recent capsule titled Travel Wardrobe, a spirited collection crafted in luxurious, natural fabrications with a minimal footprint. SJ now lives in Sydney’s beautiful Watsons Bay with her partner and three sons and keeps grounded with daily swims in the harbour. In conversation with SJ, we discussed her work as a fashion designer, wellness and mindset coach and all that has inspired the life and work of this effervescent and wise woman.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1552, 1551, 1550, 1549, 1548, 1547, 1546,  1546]","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Muse: Sarah-Jane Clarke","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/sjc-musings-tile-.jpeg?t=1627980680"},"title":"Muse: Sarah-Jane Clarke","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/muse-sarahjane-clarke/"}
Muse: Sarah-Jane Clarke

Muse: Sarah-Jane Clarke

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{"author":"Sally Paton ","date_published":"23rd Jul 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"BIANCA SPENDER\r\n\r\n\tThoughtful, precise and imaginative, Bianca J Spender designs clothes that have a rhythm. They are timeless, yet Bianca believes it is her responsibility as a designer to seek out new ideas that are resolved enough in their beauty to last. The essence of her label, Bianca Spender, is poetic energy balanced by precise structure, and each season brings a directional collection of modern, sensual silhouettes.\r\n\r\n\r\nThe child of working parents, Bianca grew up in Woollahra, Sydney, side by side with her siblings, Alex and Allegra. Bianca recalls both her sister and her growing up fast to try to join in on the fun of their older brother. As the daughter of an Australian fashion matriarch, fashion was always a part of her universe. She has a historical perspective on design, holding reverence for those who came before her, and builds upon this to create a modern beauty that engages with the senses and spirit of the wearer. Bianca is a longtime collaborator of Showroom-x, joining us in our WeWearAustralia campaign. We were delighted to be in conversation with Bianca on craft, longevity, and the Australian creative landscape.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"Someone once said that I design for     \r\n\twomen with curly hair and I think that’s a great metaphor...\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"that I design for women who   \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\tdon’t need everything in control,\r\n\t\r\n\ta more organic sensuality.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nDo you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity? Something within the realm or design or dressing that feels innately regional? \r\n\t I believe we have a more relaxed approach driven by our proximity to the ocean and nature. But we have different light, it’s a harsh and strong light that creates our vivid colour palette.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you best describe what you do professionally?\r\n\t \r\nI’m very fortunate that my work and craft allows me to explore and challenge all that inspires me creatively. My day-to-day is about pushing that craftsmanship, learning more, and leaning into where that takes me.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you to fashion design?\r\n\t \r\nI love the way that fashion and what you wear can change the way you feel. That choice can improve your mood or make you feel strong and help see you through your day.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it?\r\n\t \r\nI love the journey I get to go on each season, the storytelling of each garment in their drape. I am a true math geek at heart, so I love nothing more than draping and pattern-making to solve a problem.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t“I dress for movement, how it feels on my body and how it dances with me. I’m often most comfortable in a full-length dress and no shoes, it’s about a freedom and self-expression.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires you professionally?\r\n\t \r\nI’ve always had an affinity for the arts, dance and movement and, of course, nature. Working with other creatives who have a strong vision and are collaborative inspires me. It’s always been rewarding to meld creativity between different dialects. I especially loved working with Rafael at Sydney Dance Company for this reason.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live? What does a typical day look like for you?\r\n\t \r\nMost mornings, I am on the bus or train with my kids to go to school, or I bike in to work. My week always starts with meetings, and I leave Wednesday to Friday free for creativity. If you’re by the studio, you’ll likely see me, an extrovert, talking with a tea in my hand.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape?\r\n\t \r\nWe are dynamic in the way we have ideas and let them grow. We’re always open to new concepts or views. Since Covid, we are honing into our own creative process and aren’t as outward-looking. It’s an interesting time for designers and creatives to be true to their vision with less noise from the outside world and really getting a chance to focus on the Australian customer.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity? Something within the realm of design or dressing that feels innately regional?\r\n\t \r\nI believe we have a more relaxed approach driven by our proximity to the ocean and nature. But we have different light. It’s a harsh and strong light that creates our vivid colour palette.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your approach to dressing? And how does it make you feel?\r\n\t \r\nI dress for movement, how it feels on my body and how it dances with me. I’m often most comfortable in a full-length dress and no shoes. It’s about a freedom and self-expression.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWho are some of your favourite designers?\r\n\t \r\nRyan Storer, Dinosaur Designs and Sarah Sebastian all for very different reasons - they all have a beautiful craft.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDesigners Phoebe Philo & Clare Waight Keller. The Creativity of Junya Watanabe for Comme des Garçons. Original Balenciaga for his incredible cut. Vintage Madame Grès and Madeleine Vionnet for their draping.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you ‘can’t do without’? \r\n\t \r\nMy grandfather’s watch\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me a little about your approach to beauty and wellness.\r\n\t \r\nI enjoy the simple things of walking or riding to work, swimming in the ocean and mediation. I drink lots of water and am never without a cup of herbal tea.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat does luxury mean to you?  \r\n\t \r\nTime.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me a little about Bianca Spender. What motivated you to start the label?\r\n\t \r\nI truly love the craft, and I wanted to create a freedom for women. Someone once said that I design for women with curly hair, and I think that’s a great metaphor – that I design for women who don’t need everything in control, a more organic sensuality.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat are some changes you’ve noted in the fashion industry in recent times? For example, with Ethical or Sustainable fashion, or digitisation and technology?\r\n\t \r\nIt’s exciting to see the focus on sustainability. We have always been Australian made, and I had some people think I was a dinosaur for not moving to offshore production however many years ago, but it’s so great now to see this is something we can again have pride in. As a brand, we still have a long journey to go. I also love the direct voice of designing coming through more with social media rather than the traditional wholesale channels. It’s so much closer to the customer. It also creates unique groups like Showroom X and the combined interests and discussions about creativity and design, and that fashion is more than what you wear. It’s the storytelling of people dressing for themselves.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is your approach towards maintaining responsible business?\r\n\t \r\nTo me, it’s about making choices that are right for me as a designer and a business, and not bending to industry pressures on sale timings or what fashion week should look like.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow do you envisage the future of fashion?\r\n\t \r\nI feel there will be a continued shift toward the need for transparency and improvement on the constant evolution to design creatively and understand the use of limited precious resources—moves like working with deadstock and designing within those limitations to reduce new fabric production.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you have any idols - professional or personal?\r\n\t \r\nI don’t like to idolise people – we are all inspiring and flawed in many ways.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat or who is currently inspiring your world at the moment? \r\n\t \r\nAnne Hollander’s fashion and drape, Joan Didion’s book The Year of Magical Thinking, Story Work with Bridget Brandon, Veda Mediation and The Met’s About Time: Fashion and Duration Exhibition (you can watch it online).\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDescribe your workspace – where is it located, and what do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?\r\n\t \r\nWe are currently in Darling Point, Sydney. I like to have a space that feels mine and energy in the office. We have the bay and harbour across the road, and having that nature and sense of openness nearby is wonderful for creating calm.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Thoughtful, precise and imaginative, Bianca J Spender designs clothes that have a rhythm. They are timeless, yet Bianca believes it is her responsibility as a designer to seek out new ideas that are resolved enough in their beauty to last. The essence of her label, Bianca Spencer, is poetic energy balanced by precise structure, and each season brings a directional collection of modern, sensual silhouettes. \r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/kitty-clark/\r\n        - /musings/what-you-need-to-know-about-fabric-dyeing/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-merino-wool/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1573, 1572, 1571, 1570, 1569]","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Bianca Spender ","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/bianca-spender-musing-tile-image-v2.jpg?t=1627020450"},"title":"Bianca Spender ","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/bianca-spender-/"}
Bianca Spender

Bianca Spender

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"22nd Jul 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Brodie Neill\r\n\r\n\tBrodie Neill is a furniture designer, and the more time you spend with him, the more insufficient that label feels. After growing up in the wildness of Tasmania, Brodie ventured abroad to complete his masters at the Rhode Island School of Design, an experience he says opened him up to a world of creative possibilities. Since establishing his studio in London’s East End, Brodie has created progressive sculptural works with an impressive roster of clients, from McQueen to Microsoft. His limited edition works live in museums, galleries, and private collections across the globe.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIn 2016, Brodie represented Australia at the inaugural London Design Biennale with a critically acclaimed installation, Plastic Effects. This “ocean terrazzo” collection saw Brodie create a nature-driven technology which transformed ocean waste into mesmerising and provocative works. The resulting material and designs, a hypnotic coalescence of colour, form and texture, reified his role as an eco-innovator and environmental spokesperson. Brodie has since participated at talks in the European Union parliament and a marine conference hosted by the United Nations.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me a little about your upbringing. What is your family like? \r\n\t \r\n\t My family was very creative, so therefore I was very much introduced to the arts and taught to express myself as a creative person from a young age. I was also surrounded by the wilderness and the adventures that are literally on the doorstep of Hobart. You can’t help but be inspired by nature. It was an amazing upbringing.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            The ocean pieces came from      \r\n\ta moment back in Tasmania and seeing the presence of plastic on the beach.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nI wanted them to be the\r\n\t\r\n\tbuilding blocks\r\n\tof something new\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nHow would you best describe what you do professionally?  \r\n\t I call myself a furniture designer. It’s my default safe place, but I’ve been called everything from an environmentalist to an industrial designer, sculptor, architect. It is all-encompassing, but furniture design is my base, my foundations, so that’s where I come back to. It’s what I studied and is an epicentre for me to then explore other areas.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you to furniture design? \r\n\t \r\nI grew up as a creative child from a young age, and it just built. Then, around maybe 12-13, it went from 2D to 3D, and I just started building things. I inherited all these tools from my grandfather, who was an engineer. I built things with my hands and never did the same thing twice, always expressing, to see what I could do. I learned that Tassie was a hot spot for this kind of craftsmanship. Once I got to university, it opened my mind. It laid out a potential future that was exciting. It made me realise this is not just something you do in your shed, that this is something that could take you around the world, across cultures, transcend scale and all types of creative mediums.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you love most about it? What gives you the drive to do it every day?\r\n\t \r\nThe creative challenge. Constantly challenging myself to do new projects in new areas. I hate repeating myself. There’s something in the design process. There’s that realisation, the quest to achieve whatever it is you’re trying to create. Once that’s done, then it has lost that kind of love and energy. It’s the challenge, and that could be creating a chair for production or a one-off public sculpture.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires your creative practice?\r\n\t \r\nI am conscious of feeding my thoughts and inspiration, putting myself in a position where those inspirational moments will happen. A lot of the ideas are quite instant, a moment of serendipity where it just happens. You get a ‘what if?’ moment. What if a chair looked like this? What happens if this material did that? It starts like that. It’s a curiosity that you explore. You have to put yourself in the position where you’re going to be inspired. I attend art exhibitions, get out to nature, engage with contemporary culture. I read a lot outside my field - fashion, sculpture, environmentalism.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Daydreaming didn’t do me so well in school, but now it gets me a long way.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live?\r\n\t \r\nI live in London. I’ve been here for about 16 years. Day-to-day, at the moment, I’m still kind of working from home. We closed my studio in March 2020 at the start of the lockdown. I have a team of 6 people in total, and we all work collaboratively. I check in with them in the morning, and my first couple of hours are often calls back home in Australia, as I still do a lot of work out of there. And as the day goes on, I get more of my own creative time. We’ve been really busy through the lockdown.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you think because people have been so much more focused on their homes because they were spending so much more time in them?\r\n\t \r\nYes. The similarity between my field and fashion is the shows. The trade shows, fashion shows, and you’re just bouncing between the two in a bit of a rat race. And then suddenly we had all this time on our hands, from a creative point of view.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHave you noticed a change in your work since lockdown?\r\n\t \r\nYeah. Not within my style but in the type of work I do. Growing up in Tassie, there’s a big designer-maker thing where your work is created to show in a gallery. In Europe, it’s more big projects. I’ve now seen this reverse, back to basics, with these big commissions. It’s people putting more time and money into their homes.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity? Something within your realm that feels innately Australian?\r\n\t \r\nThere is a sense of expression and freedom. There’s no distinct style. Well, there can be. In Australian designers, there’s a push where some people will reference other styles, the Italian model, the Scandinavian model, the Japanese model. They’re very controlled markets, where Australia is a lot more open. And that’s what I mean when I say we have that freedom to express and be quite diverse.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat or who is currently inspiring your world at the moment?\r\n\t \r\nThere are two worlds which I take inspiration from. The first would be nature. I’m completely blown away by nature’s perfection and the evolution of form. But then, now, we have these digital capabilities where we can replicate these through structures, forms and industrial processes.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tCan you tell me a little about your ecological design? You do a talk called Waste to Wonder and have used ocean plastic waste to create new materials? \r\n\t \r\nThe ocean pieces came from a moment back in Tasmania and seeing the presence of plastic on the beach. I wanted them to be the building blocks of something new in a closed-loop cycle. It starts with a material and recontextualising it. To look at material and think what the potential in it is. Even if that is a perfectly new piece of wood, it’s a blank canvas, and it’s taken a long time to create itself. As a designer, you have a responsibility to that material, to turn it into something useful and with longevity. Recontextualising our relationship with the materials is very important. When you look at waste material, you think, “well, that had a life, it’s been discarded, and it has become waste”, but it still has potential. And I suppose there’s been an evolution through my work. I launched Remix in 2008, which is one of Kelly’s favourites. It’s a chaise lounge which has multicolour stripes.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tCan you take me through the creative and physical process of making Remix?\r\n\t \r\nIt came from a curiosity when I was in my Shoreditch studio looking out my window, thinking to myself, “how am I going to afford all the materials to make my design”. And the construction site across the street was throwing all these sheet materials into the skip. So, here was all this potential. This material is going to go into landfill. I’ve got to do something with it. So, I started collecting that material, going to workshops, and looking at what was surplus from production, and I started recycling and upcycling. Suddenly I had 44 layers of different materials, which could all be CNC cut, a robotic machine that cuts it out. This robot is programmed to cut through a material, to sculpt basically, now that could be marble, it could be marshmallow. The robot doesn’t know. It’s just programmed to do it. If you sandwich all these materials together, it’ll just cut it as one. That was probably the first big piece that really took waste and transformed it, and Remix ended up in museums around the world.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nHow would you describe your personal style? \r\n\t \r\nMonochromatic, very white and very black. I’d describe it as Antwerpian.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nDo you have any idols? \r\n\t \r\nI look at the masters. Furniture designers and real pioneers pushing form and experimentation through the 50s and 60s. From Eero Saarinen, Verner Panton, and sculptors like Henri Moore, Noguchi.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIf you would like to purchase Brodie's Cowrie Chair please contact us by email on customercare@showroom-x.com or by phone on 0417 219 388. If you are Perth based we would love you to come and see the chair in person at our Claremont showroom. \r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Brodie Neill is a furniture designer, and the more time you spend with him, the more insufficient that label feels. After growing up in the wildness of Tasmania, Brodie ventured abroad to complete his masters at the Rhode Island School of Design, an experience he says opened him up to a world of creative possibilities. Since establishing his studio in London’s East End, Brodie has created progressive sculptural works with an impressive roster of clients, from McQueen to Microsoft. His limited edition works live in museums, galleries, and private collections across the globe. In 2016, Brodie represented Australia at the inaugural London Design Biennale with a critically acclaimed installation, Plastic Effects. This “ocean terrazzo” collection saw Brodie create a nature-driven technology which transformed ocean waste into mesmerising and provocative works. The resulting material and designs, a hypnotic coalescence of colour, form and texture, reified his role as an eco-innovator and environmental spokesperson. Brodie has since participated at talks in the European Union parliament and a marine conference hosted by the United Nations.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/kitty-clark/\r\n        - /musings/what-you-need-to-know-about-fabric-dyeing/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-merino-wool/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1568, 1415, 1413, 1412]","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Brodie Neill ","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/brodie-neill-chair.jpeg?t=1626929099"},"title":"Brodie Neill ","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/brodie-neill-/"}
Brodie Neill

Brodie Neill

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"9th Jul 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Tatsiana Shevarenkova\r\n\r\n\tTatsiana Shevarenkova is a Sydney based artist who creates dramatic yet utilitarian objects through a range of throwing and hand-building techniques. Tatsiana grew up in a little town called Pinsk in Belarus and holds loving memories of running through beautiful wheat fields, playing with neighbours till dark, harvesting ripe cucumbers and berries from her grandma’s yard, and secretly rescuing stray cats. After building a career as a fashion stylist in Moscow, Tatsiana moved to Australia and explored her curiosity of more tactile mediums.\r\n\r\n\r\nAs a self-taught artist, Tatsiana founded Cosset Ceramics and, moved by the biomorphic sculptors of the mid 20th Century, she began to explore sculptural forms. She is inspired by the motherly figures of Noguchi and Jean Arp. Her continuous series of planters, titled The Muses, reveres the beauty of Renaissance art, where the female body is presented as natural and charming.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"I think Australian   \r\n\tcreativity is often intertwined with social change or coming to terms with itself\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"With clay, I feel    \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\tfreedom\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nTell me a little about your upbringing - where were you born and raised? What is your family like? \r\n\t I was raised by strong women, not dissimilar to many children in post-Soviet countries, with very little presence of fatherly figures. Nonetheless, I am very lucky to have a loving older brother who looked after me. When I was 13, my family and I moved to Moscow, a city of more opportunity, to eventually study economics at a more reputable university.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you best describe what you do professionally?\r\n\t \r\nUltimately, what I do professionally is experiment with clay to make sculptures and lighting. There are many possible ways to theorise this, but it can be boiled down to both play and experimentation with forms.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you to the practice of sculpture? \r\n\t \r\nFreedom. I previously worked in fashion, and fashion imagery, which is often constrained by variables that are out of your immediate control. Realising creative ideas is contingent on resources available at the time. On the contrary, with clay, I feel freedom. What I desire to make is entirely dependent on my skill and patience.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it?\r\n\t \r\nHours fly by. It’s an entertaining and inspiring process. The physical sensation of touching clay is both grounding and calming. Also, it feels satisfying to finish a new object and recognise its character.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t“On the first day, I prepare the base using mould pressing techniques. On the following days, I improvise with curves. It takes four to five days to refine and finish the shape.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires your creative practice?\r\n\t \r\nThe contours of bodies and abstract biomorphic shapes. Shapes that look warm and welcoming. I draw inspiration from Henry Moore, Louise Bourgeois and Noguchi. However, I believe context is perhaps more important than reference. Being around and working with kind people is a motor for productivity. The company I share often inspires my practice.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live?\r\n\t \r\nI live in Elizabeth Bay in a cute apartment with a garden and a lovely view of the harbour. When I don’t have any meetings scheduled in the morning, I usually take it slow. I’ll do some admin for an hour or so, then head to my Marrickville studio. I usually have 3-5 pieces going at any given time. This is followed by emails and material research which often extends well into the night. That said, I’m privileged to be able to drop everything to visit friends or go for a swim, which I often do.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape?\r\n\t \r\nAlthough I’m still relatively new to Australia, I’ve had the luxury of being exposed to many creative practices. In Sydney, for me, what’s exciting is a community that feels youthful irrespective of age. At a much broader level, it would be remiss of me not to appreciate the social and political conditions in which Australian artists practice. There is no pressure to make compromises, as is often the case in Russia. By this, I mean anyone can make art to any end. This prospect is inherently exciting.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity? Something within the realm of design or dressing that feels innately Australian?\r\n\t \r\nThis is a difficult question, and I’m probably misplaced to qualify anything that feels innately Australian. In any case, I’ve visited galleries and spaces in many places around the world, but nowhere seems as politically attuned. Australian artists confront their history and reckon with political issues. In this sense, I think Australian creativity is often intertwined with social change or coming to terms with itself. A process of unravelling, maybe.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style?\r\n\t \r\nI rarely consider it, but I’d say it’s quite relaxed and minimal. I mostly care about comfort and materials that feel nice on my skin.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWho are some of your favourite designers (local and international)?\r\n\t \r\nLocally, I like Deiji Studios, Albus Lumen and Matteau. I like Margiela, Bottega under Daniel Lee, Totême with Elin Kling and Karl Lindman, and Simone Rocha. Also, the dreamy Albina Zueva in Saint Petersbourg - founder of MY812.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you ‘can’t do without?\r\n\t \r\nWhite pants. It sounds like a ridiculous choice for such a messy occupation, but the truth is, white pants make me look half decent. When clay dries on the clothes, it turns white, unless it’s red, then I’m in trouble.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWho are your idols?\r\n\t \r\nCats. For their gentleness and grace.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat or who is currently inspiring your world?\r\n\t \r\nI admire sculptors who dedicated their entire lives to craftsmanship, like Schlegel, Noguchi or Brancusi. I want to know what urged them to spend their days in dusty studios and what drew them to particular materials. In the studio, I’ve been listening to David Bowie, Boy Harsher, and Martin Dupont.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nDescribe your workspace - where is it located, and what do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?\r\n\t \r\nI’ve recently changed studios and am still settling in. My new space is in Marrickville, shared with four other talented ceramicists. To help myself concentrate and begin working with clay, I burn incense. Lots of incense. I hope it doesn’t annoy my new neighbours. But I won’t be able to create a thing if I have even a tiny amount of mess around me. Cleanliness and music is all the motivation I need.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nCan you describe the process of creating one of your artworks?\r\n\t \r\nFor my sculptures, I use grogged clays and coil-building techniques. I allow the clay to guide me rather than forcing anything on it. I challenge myself with ideas and shapes while observing and learning from the forms of which the clay wants to take. Once I’m pleased with the form, I work on the contours and the texture. Although I research and experiment with glaze recipes, most of the time, I keep my work unglazed for its natural look. Lastly, I prefer earthenware firing as it places less stress on my shapes.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tImage Credits:Photography by Jacqui Turk \r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Tatsiana Shevarenkova is a Sydney based artist who creates dramatic yet utilitarian objects through a range of throwing and hand-building techniques. Tatsiana grew up in a little town called Pinsk in Belarus and holds loving memories of running through beautiful wheat fields, playing with neighbours till dark, harvesting ripe cucumbers and berries from her grandma’s yard, and secretly rescuing stray cats. After building a career as a fashion stylist in Moscow, Tatsiana moved to Australia and explored her curiosity of more tactile mediums. As a self-taught artist, Tatiana founded Cosset Ceramics and, moved by the biomorphic sculptors of the mid 20th Century, she began to explore sculptural forms. She is inspired by the motherly figures of Noguchi and Jean Arp. Her continuous series of planters, titled The Muses, reveres the beauty of Renaissance art, where the female body is presented as natural and charming.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/kitty-clark/\r\n        - /musings/what-you-need-to-know-about-fabric-dyeing/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-merino-wool/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1535, 1536, 1537, 1538, 1539, 1534, 1267, 1271, 1303, 1506]","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Introducing Tatsiana Shevarenkova","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/tatsiana-banner.jpg?t=1625723902"},"title":"Introducing Tatsiana Shevarenkova","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/"}
Introducing Tatsiana Shevarenkova

Introducing Tatsiana Shevarenkova

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"17th Jun 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Henryk Lobaczewski\r\n\r\n\tHenryk Lobaczewski is a Sydney based artist and photographer. We have been familiar with his thoughtful fashion imagery for many years, and when he began his painted works, we greedily wanted more than one to live in our homes. Henryk approaches his contemporary abstract works intuitively, finding much of his inspiration in tones and colours from the pages of fashion magazines. Every piece is a study of balance, weight of texture and exploration of colour. Henryk grew up on a 10-acre parcel of bushland an hour out of Brisbane and learnt to drive sitting on his dad's knee with his twin sisters screaming from the back seat. He has spent his life surrounded by women, now sharing a home with his wife and two girls, and has an ever-creative mother who nurtured his desire to draw from a young age. The wonder of his father’s silver box filled with cameras and lenses still burns in his memory. It catalyzed his interest in photography, and he still remembers his first camera, a red Kodak point and shoot. Henryk has always been drawn to aesthetic delights and says that he creates works to share beauty with this world.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tTell me a little about yourself as a young man.  \r\n\t At age 11, I started work at an orchid nursery, and I fell deeply in love with orchids. At age 14, I had saved the money to pay to build a large greenhouse to house my orchid collection. My dad just told me to tell the bulldozer operator where I wanted it. I had amazing parents. I spent all my pay on orchids. I was always an all or nothing kind of guy. My dad passed away when I turned 15 and that loss defined who I am today.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            When I'm painting, I'm in   \r\n\ta constant state of play. It's definitely a meditative practice.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nI'm lucky to now be on my\r\n\t\r\n\tthird\r\n\tbig passion project in life\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nWhat drew you to the practice of painting?  \r\n\t I have pined for it for a good ten years or so. I knew it was an expensive form of expression, and I never had the space, funds or time to create the forms of works I wanted to see out there. When I moved from an apartment into a house with a garden, it all changed. I set aside a budget and went into it deep. I'm now painting 2-3 times a week, as much as my other businesses will allow. I'm drawn to the child-like, carefree allure. And I always play on that. My paintings are simple yet intense, bold.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it? \r\n\t \r\nI love that there are no rules, just material limitations, and I'm always trying to stretch them. When I'm painting, I'm in a constant state of play. It's definitely a meditative practice. I also love that when I'm painting, I'm not trying to 'sell something' like my other work as a fashion advertising photographer. There is no dress or pair of shoes I'm subconsciously selling that I have to keep in the back of mind while trying to be creative. No. With painting, the 'sell' is always an afterthought.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires your creative practice?\r\n\t \r\nStrong colour & texture, and simplicity. I love seeing confidence & boldness in art.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“It's a ritual. I paint canvases inside at night when everyone is asleep, and I paint my concrete works during the afternoon in the garden.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live?\r\n\t \r\nI currently live in Vaucluse in Sydney, but we just bought a Spanish mission-style home we are renovating in the Upper North Shore. I normally do emails, paint in the day if I can, and work on images & editing until 1:00-3:00 AM. So, I am definitely not a morning person! I now find I reward myself with painting time after I achieve an editing goal. Sometimes I edit, then paint, or paint, then edit, but I try to do some of both each day. Some days have become full paint days recently as I currently have a lot of commissions. And there's always a lot of playtime in between with my two girls.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape?\r\n\t \r\nDue to Covid, I feel like people have found their passion projects and are now pursuing them relentlessly. We only have so much time in this world, and it's not to be wasted on doing what you don't want to be doing. I'm lucky to now be on my third big passion project in life, painting, while still keeping all three in play. This also helps to fund the huge amounts of paint I use!\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style?\r\n\t \r\nEuropean minimalism, or over the top loud and proud, depending on the day. I don't like to have brands showing, ever.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you have any favourite designers (Australian and international)?\r\n\t \r\nGucci, Fear of God, Givenchy, Acne.  Joseph Dirand for interiors.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWho are your idols?\r\n\t \r\nPicasso & Steven Miesel.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat or who is currently inspiring your world at the moment? \r\n\t \r\nWhen I paint, music is a big part of the inspiration, and I only listen to one artist, DJ Rhee, located in Bali. He gives away his one-hour sets for free on his website, and it keeps me in my flow state. You can donate too if you love it. Bali needs it!\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDescribe your workspace - where is it located, and what do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?\r\n\t \r\nI like to create solo, with loud music playing, connected to my flow state. I don't drink & paint, as I want the connection to be all-encompassing with a clear mind. It's a ritual. I paint canvases inside at night when everyone is asleep, and I paint my concrete works during the afternoon in the garden. They are super messy. We are hoping to make a studio space in the build of the new house. I'm really looking forward to that!\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nCan you briefly describe the creative process of creating one of your artworks? \r\n\t \r\nIt always starts with colour. I might see a colourway in a fashion editorial shoot that I like. An image of a beautiful black model in an orange dress with light shining on the dress bringing out the tones of yellow and orange, inspired a whole orange piece I recently sold. I have recently played best with a solid colour or a maximum of two tones within the same colour to show depth. I feel like this will evolve into mixing some of these tones together, but I'm still obsessed with a solid colour. I then decide on canvas (acrylic) or board (acrylic or cement mix), and then once the tone is mixed, the music starts, and the painting doesn't stop until it looks right. Sometimes it's 17 minutes. Sometimes it's 2-3 hours. I'm very much an in-the-moment do-what-feels-right kind of painter. There's a child-like approach to getting that paint on the surface. It's quick & reactive. Then it dries.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tListen to Henryk’s painting soundtrack\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIf you would like to request a commissioned piece by Henryk please contact customercare@showroom-x.com. Henryk can customise the colour and size of his painted works to complement your space.\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Henryk Lobaczewski is a Sydney based artist and photographer. We have been familiar with his thoughtful fashion imagery for many years, and when he began his painted works, we greedily wanted more than one to live in our homes. Henryk approaches his contemporary abstract works intuitively, finding much of his inspiration in tones and colours from the pages of fashion magazines. Every piece is a study of balance, weight of texture and exploration of colour. Henryk grew up on a 10-acre parcel of bushland an hour out of Brisbane and learnt to drive sitting on his dad's knee with his twin sisters screaming from the back seat. He has spent his life surrounded by women, now sharing a home with his wife and two girls, and has an ever-creative mother who nurtured his desire to draw from a young age. The wonder of his father’s silver box filled with cameras and lenses still burns in his memory. It catalyzed his interest in photography, and he still remembers his first camera, a red Kodak point and shoot. Henryk has always been drawn to aesthetic delights and says that he creates works to share beauty with this world.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/kitty-clark/\r\n        - /musings/what-you-need-to-know-about-fabric-dyeing/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-merino-wool/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1488, 1027, 1079, 1108]","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Artist in Residence - Henryk Lobaczewski","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/1725ae20-2497-4926-8380-84997b5b79dd.jpg?t=1623918466"},"title":"Artist in Residence - Henryk Lobaczewski","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/artist-in-residence-henryk-lobaczewski/"}
Artist in Residence - Henryk Lobaczewski

Artist in Residence - Henryk Lobaczewski

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"24th May 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"EVI-O\r\n\r\n\tEvi O is a self-taught artist and book designer with a curious eye and mind. Evi is constantly exploring and observing her surroundings, moving to Sydney at age 17 from her home in Surabaya, Indonesia. She is a painter, and Evi’s practice fulfills a desire to express her creativity and stories without boundaries and limitations.\r\n\r\n\r\nThe creatures and scenes Evi O paints are symbolic of people, places, and scenes that have left their mark on her – and this affords an intimacy with her subjects that infuses the images with emotional resonance. Growing up in a family of creatives and entrepreneurs, she is strong-minded, motivated, and constantly seeking new and creative ways to work, live in, and paint the world. Colour is a cornerstone of her practice, but her personal style is based in black.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"I feel lucky that the world we live in is filled with  \r\n\tinteresting people and that’s what it’s all about.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"I think it’s    \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\trather perfect\r\n\t\r\n\tin its imperfection.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nTell me a little about your upbringing - where were you born and raised? What is your family like? \r\n\t My family is a mix of working middle-class people, entrepreneurs, academics, and a few creatives, so my family gatherings are always interesting. My grandmother from Dad’s side – Oma Betty – grew up in part during the colonial era. She didn’t go to school, yet she spent all her life absorbed in a variety of entrepreneurial pursuits. My uncle Dede was already fighting for the LGBTQI community internationally during the 70s. These are just a little sampler of the environment I grew up in. I think all of them combined make a lot of sense when I try to explain how I see this small, big world.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you best describe what you do professionally?\r\n\t \r\nA ‘creative’ is the term I use loosely to describe what I do, but I understand it’s very broad. I’m a creative director and an artist, and an author. I started with graphic design, worked in a publishing house for a decade before starting my own design studio of 6, working on brand and publishing projects. I am a practicing artist represented by Saint Cloche, and I just wrote a book called Day Trip Sydney, the first of many.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you to the practice of painting? What do you enjoy about it?\r\n\t \r\nI like how ‘no tricks’ it is. It’s almost that painting is perhaps one of the most traditional forms of art, yet it doesn’t limit you from telling a story or an idea and having a lively communication with your audience. In its simplicity, you can play with scale and textures to create a more spatial experience. I am just scratching the surface when I talk about my art practice, though.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires your creative practice?\r\n\t \r\nReal life. Real things I see, observe, and ponder upon. A lot of them are human-related. I’m obsessed with the idea of being, what it means, and those existential thoughts we all have. The idea I ruminate on for each art piece is always personal, and all of them stem from a personal experience or those of my peers. I feel lucky that the world we live in is filled with interesting people and that’s what it’s all about. I think it’s rather perfect in its imperfection.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Think artistic cuts, a good mix of materials, and not shy of expression.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live?\r\n\t \r\nI live in Redfern, my design and art studio is in Marrickville.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat does a typical day look like for you?\r\n\t \r\nI’d get up and tend to my sweet whippet, Henri, have a sliver of morning niceties with my partner Andrew if time allows before entering the hustle and bustle of the Marrickville studio. Arriving, we would do shouty greetings between office dwellers Daniel Shipp, the wizard photographer, and Paulina DeLaveaux, Thames & Hudson publisher extraordinaire. Then I enter the design and art studio where Susan, Nicole, Kait, Wilson, Zoe, Zac, and I create some magic. A day is a wedge of painting, designing, and meetings, always with music. Before you know it, it’ll be home time. Some days we do longer hours to communicate with clients from the opposite hemisphere, but I am a big promoter of work-life balance, so I stress that you take the evenings as seriously as the mornings. This means dinners and seeing people I love.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape?\r\n\t \r\nI think our remote location within this world can be both good or bad. Good in that it is a unique place that will come with its own kind of inspiration, and it is a less ‘noisy’ space if you would like to focus and cook an idea. You can easily witness this when you see the unique works of some Australian artists and designers that are forging their path internationally. But I think it can also be bad if you get comfortable and forget about the many other worlds that exist out there.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style?\r\n\t \r\nI’d say crafted. I wear very little colour these days – I wear a lot of black – but I appreciate detailing. Think artistic cuts, a good mix of materials, and not shy of expression.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you have any favourite designers (Australian and international)?\r\n\t \r\nMy wardrobe is dominated by pieces from Commes Des Garcons, Junya Watanabe, Margiela, Acne, and Henrik Vibskov, a sprinkle of Song for the Mute, Lee Mathews, and Issey Miyake here and there. I’d love to wear a wider variety of brands, but I also know it takes lots of trial and error to find brands with cuts that fit your body - just like a good relationship!\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWho are your idols?\r\n\t \r\nMy Oma Betty is a living, life idol. She is 93 this year, and to grow to her age and be as positive as the sun every single second of her life is an inspiration.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat or who is currently inspiring your world? \r\n\t \r\nI always find Henrik Vibskov inspiring in that he runs his art, music, and fashion practice rather holistically. M/M Paris for their smooth way of marrying art and design.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDescribe your workspace - where is it located and what do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?\r\n\t \r\nThe design studio is deemed ‘The Yellow Office’ by my 3-year-old friend Lulu, I guess because of the wood panelling on the wall and our oak furniture. It is not the neatest nor most glamorous, but it’s filled with creativity. I liken it to a Japanese architect’s tasteful but messy desk. The art studio is an art studio - panels, paints, and tubs - it’s a working space. Both have a different energy. The design office is very fast-paced, but the art studio feels like time stops there. Both always have music on. And both are located at the end of a Marrickville building which used to be Ansett Airlines’ BlackBox investigation office. While the art studio is fine with me alone, the design office needs its inhabitants to feel the way it’s supposed to feel.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nCan you take me through the creative and physical process in making one of your works, from inception to the final piece.\r\n\t \r\nIt always starts with an idea, then an idea of the execution, before a deep dive into creating the work. The first part is what takes the longest, but once you’re deep in the world… sometimes I don’t want to ever leave!\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tImage Credits: Some images from Lee Mathews Journal @leemathewsau / Photography by Martyn Thompson @martynthompsonstudio\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Evi O is a self-taught artist and book designer with a curious eye and mind. Evi is constantly exploring and observing her surroundings, moving to Sydney at age 17 from her home in Surabaya, Indonesia. She is a painter, and Evi’s practice fulfills a desire to express her creativity and stories without boundaries and limitations.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/kitty-clark/\r\n        - /musings/what-you-need-to-know-about-fabric-dyeing/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-merino-wool/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1416, 1415, 1414, 1413, 1412, 1411, 852, 1073, 613, 368]","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Introducing - EVI-O","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/evi-o-parallax-1-asset-2.jpg?t=1621857605"},"title":"Introducing - EVI-O","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/introducing-evio/"}
Introducing - EVI-O

Introducing - EVI-O

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