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MUSINGS

        
{"author":"Written by Kelly Atkinson / Edited by Sally Paton","date_published":"18th Nov 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Travel Diary: #WeWearAustralian 2021\r\n\r\n\tOn set | On Country. Shooting the WWA international campaign. Travel Diary from Kelly Atkinson, our Creative Director.\r\n\r\n\r\nThe WeWearAustralian International campaign shoot was single-handedly the most fulfilling yet challenging project I have ever been a part of. \r\nRichard and I took a humble idea, to help champion Australian brands to our country and the rest of the world. We made a campaign, a site, and most significantly, a movement out of it.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tFor us, living in Australia is a luxury, from the vast expanses of ocean, clear blue skies and earth that seems to have been set ablaze. The coastlines of the Kimberley region are a place of extremes. Turquoise seas and bleached-white sand are set against orange cliffs. Months of drought are broken by thunderstorms which drench the soil and bring the earth back to life. It's hard to escape its magic.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tBROOME / Day 1 - Location 1  \r\n\tAs we step off the plane the heat hits you from the tarmac. We are in the west, and it's only 8 am. Time waits for no one - off we go as cavalry to the Airbnb ready for call time 1 pm.  \r\nBroome set our senses alight; Cable Beach the first shot. \r\nThe vibrant colour from sand to sky, orange sun on skin, the sway of big bodied camels approaching us, heads craned towards the sun. \r\nJimmy’s cheeky smile met our eyes before his voice welcomed us to Country. \r\nEach day left our bodies drained but spirits full. \r\nWe washed the heat away at king tide on Cable Beach, capturing the magic of the sunset & nailed the first shot while the sand dunes reflected on the surface of the water. We had to strain our eyes to see where the ocean ended and the sky began. Wrap time 8 pm.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tGANTHEAUME POINT / Day 2 - Location 2  \r\n\tWe reluctantly opened our eyes as the cars pulled up to Gantheaume Point before the sun lit up the land. It felt like waking into a dream or landing on Mars. 5:15 am and we were already sweating.\r\nThe earth is marked with dinosaur footprints from deep time passed. We sought after the shot of our lifetime. \r\nOur five models perched upon the rocks as if they were dropped from the sky. James kept pressing down on the shutter button, but we all knew we had it. It’s still etched in my mind, marked like the dinosaur prints. Wrap time 8:30 am.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Each day \r\n\tleft our bodies drained      \r\n\tbut spirits full\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\"The heat beat down on us all...\r\n\t\r\n\tbut we all wore a smile...\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nCRAB CREEK / Day 2 - Location 3  \r\nWe vibrated down the sandy dirt road to Crab Creek, where fresh water meets the ocean. The 45-minute drive sat in our bodies. It’s only 12:45 pm.  \r\nWe slid out of our seats and steadied ourselves, feet firmly planted on the soft, warm earth. This was sacred land. Jimmy told us of the site close by where creativity was born - we felt both humbled and privileged to be there. \r\nWe were racing the tide. Four eyes on croc watch. Wave lined sand was soon covered with the glassy film of light blue water. Everything doubled; the trees, sand and sky. \r\nJimmy taught us the hand sign for strength in local language. He must have known we needed it. We were halfway through the shoot.\r\nWill wore Willie Creek Pearls around his neck, borne from the sand on which we stood, found in the sea which rose beneath our feet. Behind the lens, we each held our breath.\r\nThe heat beat down on us all, but gazing around, we all wore a smile in the magic of each element coming together. Flocks of birds passed overhead. Breathe out.\r\nWrap time 2 pm.\r\n\r\n\r\nREDDELL BEACH / Day 2 - Location 4 \r\n \r\nAfter shimmying down a cliff, we entered Reddell Beach. Everything looked painted red, sun-burnt cliffs like an abstract expressionist work of art, splattered shades of ochre. One more shot - before the sun escaped us. \r\nWe all watched our steps as tiny crabs took over the beach at dusk. The water tempted us, but we knew we had to keep on going. Wrap time 7:30 pm\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t“The sea breeze must have taken pity on us and really started to blow, drying our sweat. 56 garments on roller racks, and our 19 crew jumped into the five 4-wheel drives as we counted down the sunset. On our drive was a tiny car half-swallowed by the earth. The 19 bodies jumped out and started to push. The sunset paints our bare skin with its orange glow.\" \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tKUNNUNURA / Day 3  - Location 5 \r\n\t \r\nWe headed straight to Waringarri Aboriginal Arts centre for a welcome to country and the most amazing tour of the centre. Education is key and these amazing textiles created here with Kathy leading the ladies is an inspiring place to be. Energy boosted. \r\nLocation scouting in the dark. James, Ken and I tell Kathy we’re thankful to have her local knowledge. Chasing the sunset on location scouting we follow the trail through the mini bungles until our phones show us the path. Back at dawn still sweating. Home time 8:30 pm.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tLAKE ARGYLE/ Day 4  - Location 6\r\n\t \r\nWe were told by everyone that Lake Argyle is pure heaven. We drove our boat out, breaking the water, without another boat or body in sight. And it does feel like we’re on another plane. \r\nBeneath the surface of the lake live 300,000 baby freshwater crocodiles. Even that couldn’t stop us from diving in. We dried off under the setting sun, trying to savour every minute. Its disappearance behind the mountain ahead marked the end of the day, and the trip, for us all. We got it the money shot and the magic will stay with us all. Wrap time 7:30 am. \r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tThank You to Country\r\n\t \r\nWeWearAustralian acknowledges the traditional custodians throughout Western Australia and their continuing connection to the land, waters and culture. We pay our respects to all Aboriginal people; elders past, present and emerging. Especially acknowledging the people of Miriwoong and Yawuru country in which we filmed.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tPhotography:\r\n\t Campaign Images: James Giles @ejamesgiles / Second Camera: Claire Hart @hartclaire_  / Cinematographer: Justin Griffiths @justin_griffiths / Composer: Justin Elwin @hwls__ / Assistant Photographer: Shan Stewart @shanstewart_ / Nina Fitzgerald @neeenaar\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tProduction:\r\n\t Claire Davies, @scotterprojects/Amanda Ashurst @amandaashurst / Creative director: @ken____leung / Stylist: @__kelly__atkinson__ / HMU: Francesca Poggi @francescapoggimakeup / Model Casting: Jaz Daly @modulesmanagement\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTalent:\r\n\t Naomi Stevens @naomi__stevens / India Anderson @india.ap / William Kalimba @0shuko     / Angus Minear @angusminear / Cindy Rostron @rostroncindy07\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIn Partnership With: \r\n\tTourism WA, @wewear_australian, @westernaustralia\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        On set | On Country. Shooting the WWA international campaign. Travel Diary from Kelly Atkinson, our Creative Director. The WeWearAustralian International campaign shoot was single-handedly the most fulfilling yet challenging project I have ever been a part of. Richard and I took a humble idea, to help champion Australian brands to our country and the rest of the world. We made a campaign, a site, and most significantly, a movement out of it.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1868, 439, 432, 1398]","tags":[{"name":"Postcards","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Postcards"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Travel Diary ","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/parallax-1-asset-3.jpg?t=1637131862"},"title":"Travel Diary ","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/travel-diary-/"}
Travel Diary

Travel Diary

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"17th Nov 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Let's Talk About Pleating\r\n\r\n\tExquisite folds, delicate detailing and a meticulous making process; pleated garments exude a sensuality and movement that has forever fascinated the world of fashion. Over the course of history, the process of pleating has evolved under many artisan’s hands, with technology taking little reign. Human touch, tradition, curiosity, and entrusted knowledge are still at the heart of this exacting and time-honoured craft, with a lineage traced back to ancient Egypt. Handmade pleats decorated rulers’ tunics of silk, cotton and wool, disappearing once washed, only to be done all over again.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tPleating machines, the permanent press, and polyester have simplified the process and enabled mass production, although many pleaters still choose to create them by hand. One is Rado Pleating, a specialty hand pleating house that has been in the heart of Surry Hills, Sydney, since 1962. It is the last of its kind in Australia, and I was introduced to their immaculate artistry through their work for Australian designer Bianca Spender. Mark Radowski, a second-generation pleater, has worked at Rado Pleating for most of his life, keeping the company’s legacy alive since his father passed away. Mark’s parents started the business in 1962, having escaped war-torn Communist Poland to Australia in search of a better life, and built the business from the ground up with help from their local community. Mark is passionate, grounded and an excellent conversationalist. After many failed attempts at getting ahold of him on email or text, I called Mark on the phone, and what unfolded was a dynamic conversation on his family’s personal history, places he finds inspiration and the lasting importance he places on community, collaboration, and supporting of local production and manufacturing.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat did your family do to work in pleating, having had no experience in the field when arriving in Australia?  \r\n\t My parents came from diverse cultural backgrounds. They were both Polish; my mother was Catholic, and my father was Jewish. He met some people in the Jewish community who tried to help him, and one of them had a pleating business. There were quite a few pleating companies in Australia back in the 60s, and clothing manufacturing in Sydney was particularly vibrant. I guess he thought this might work and rented a cheap space on Reservoir street, the same street as our current factory.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Pleating is folding a fabric in some fashion, \r\n\tin multi-direction, one direction,      \r\n\tor graduated direction.\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\"Most of our work  \r\n\t\r\n\t uses pleating moulds.\r\n\t\r\n\tThings like sun rays...\"\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nWhy did they choose to start in Surry Hills? Do you have childhood memories of the factory? What was it like? \r\n\tSurry Hills was the traditional heart of the rag trade in Sydney. In the 50s and 60s, these big open factory spaces were available cheap because Surry Hills was pretty much just a grungy working-class suburb. My parents found a factory space on the 7th floor of this building. The elevator only went to the 6th floor. They had no money and were just starting out, so they took the space. It was pretty physically challenging, as I recall as a kid. Totally flat, low roof, no elevator. But our experience was probably no different to most migrants back then. We all go through tough times in the beginning, and then hopefully, you end up making good. Which was the case, I guess.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDid your dad learn about the trade through the Jewish community he worked with at first or was he self-taught? \r\n\t \r\nHe initially learnt the skill set from another older Jewish guy who had a small pleating business, I think someone in the same street. He was happy to help him. When my mum and dad started their business, they started off small, doing everything themselves. As they got busier and gained credibility in the fashion industry, they had a small workforce of maybe 6 or 7 people in their little congested space.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhen did you join the business?\r\n\t \r\nMy background was high school teaching, and my parents didn’t want me to join the business because it’s very much up and down. Clothing manufacturing and other parts of the industry are generally constant once you’ve built yourself up. But pleating is very much fashion dictated. Some years pleating was the fashion, and some years it wasn’t, and suddenly you need fewer people, and you don’t have much income. I remember my father telling me he never had more than a one year lease on his factory space because he never knew what the future would hold.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow have you seen it change over the years?\r\n\t \r\nRight now we’re very small, there’s only around 6 of us, but back then we had 30 staff. Most of them came from our ethnic background, which is Polish, after the war having had negative experiences of Communism. I was much younger and had lots of energy and enthusiasm. My father and I were quite different, but I think that we complemented each other quite well. He taught me a lot of technical skills, and I encouraged him to take on more space and buy more machinery. When he realised he would have someone by his side through it all, he said, ok, let’s expand. We had the whole floor, 30 staff, and it was bustling. Fast forward to the late 80s early 90s, the tariffs came off clothing. Suddenly everything started shifting offshore. But through it all, we’ve been here in our building, inefficiently occupying space in Surry Hills.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about pleating…\r\n\t \r\nEvery pleat has their own particular characteristics. Pleating is folding a fabric in some fashion, in multi-direction, one direction, or graduated direction. Movement relates to the pleat and the fabric that you’re using. Most things we pleat aren’t natural fibres but polyester, mainly because polyester is the most functional fabric to pleat. But we do pleat silk and wool too. Wool pleats quite nicely.  Pleating is highly skilled process work. You use special pleating moulds, which we make ourselves. In the 20 years before I joined my dad, we didn’t have machinery and equipment. He only used pleating moulds.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tAnd using pleating moulds is what you would call hand pleating? \r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t“Yes. Our history and our expertise are in hand pleating. Initially, my father learnt how to make them, then my mother, but they’re very time consuming. We became so busy that we had to employ a person full time to just make pleating moulds. The fabric is placed into them, compacted, and gets placed upright in a large stainless steel box that has steam and heat pumped into it. When we first moved into this building, we used most of its 4 levels to store our moulds. We had 10,000 pleating moulds. We still have around 1000.\"  \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is your role at Rado?\r\n\t \r\nMy role has been procuring work, managing the business, production, quality control and timelines. Nowadays, it’s my wife Marysia doing the pleating, and occasionally our two  sons lend extra hands. I didn’t ever get involved in the actual pleating side of it. All the pleating companies in Australia have closed. We managed to stay open because we own our own space, and my parents established a good reputation for having quality work. We’re focused less on the price that we charge than on making sure everything we do is to a particular standard. Sometimes some of our competitors weren’t that focused on that.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you have a collection of vintage pleated pieces you reference? Is there a historic pleater you love? I remember seeing pieces from the early 1900s by the Spanish designer Mariano Fortuny at The Met in New York, which took my breath away.\r\n\t \r\nThat’s the kind of pleating which my folks wouldn’t have been aware of initially; Fortuny or other historical references. Back in the late 80s, grunge had a big influence on fashion, and that kind of crushed and distressed effect was very popular. We weren’t familiar with it. We didn’t even see it as pleating. We were immersed in the tradition of sun rays, knife pleats, box pleats. And I remember one of the designers we worked with took me aside and said, ’Can you do this kind of stuff? The crushed stuff like Fortuny?’ and I said no, and she said, ‘Well, you want to learn quickly, or you’re going to miss out.’ Motivated by the fact that we had to keep a lot of people busy, we found different ways of presenting that look in different formats and developed new pleats. Being creative is motivated by the commercial realities, and you’d be wise to modify your brain and adapt.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tI guess it was less about looking at history and more about looking at the current. Do you use more hand pleating techniques or machinery now?\r\n\t \r\nWe do what’s best for the situation. Most of our work uses pleating moulds. Things like sun rays, based on those half-circles, which Bianca Spender does a lot of. When Bianca discovered us a few years ago, she got excited by some of the sunray samples we showed her, and she developed some of her collections based on those patterns. She seems to have a lot of success with them. We use machines only when we can’t do it by hand because we feel we have more control with the moulds. However, small pleats can only be done on the machine. Many of the crushed pleating, Fortuny type pleating or those with larger spaces that look more organic, like tree bark or something, can only be done on the machine.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tBecause so much pleating work now goes offshore, has that made you focus on custom design work where you work closely with your clients and designers?\r\n\t \r\nThat’s partly true. Probably 99% of Australian fashion is manufactured offshore. A lot of the luxury or upper-middle brands have offices here where they design or make  samples here but produce offshore. We have references of old moulds we hardly ever use, and we also have garment samples here that we’ve made over the years, and some of them go back 40 years. Sometimes people are encouraged or inspired by what we show them.  I don’t know how Bianca works, but I think she’s probably far more creative to be doing what mainstream markets are doing. Still, a lot of the commercial fashion industry since the 70s has gone over to Europe, brand’s find looks working overseas, and if it’s popular and selling in volume in Paris or Milan, they’ll buy the samples, photograph them, and have us recreate them.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tI mean, that’s basically the fast fashion model now, but they just get it from catwalk images online, and often have it on the shelf before the designers do. It’s interesting to think about that historically, though, that by nature of the fact that Australia is on opposite seasons, and we don’t feel we have a big enough market to be leaders in design, that we’ve always been following trends. I hope that’s changing. When you work with Bianca, does she seem to be an independent thinker when creating her designs?\r\n\t \r\nI definitely think so. I don’t know exactly how Bianca works, but she obviously has talented people around her, people who help and inspire, whether it be her design team or a pattern maker. It seems they work really collaboratively. She leads the team. She’ll have her own ideas about what she wants to do. I mean, how are designers inspired? Whether it be by fashion or something from history which triggers an idea in their head. They’ll come to us when they want to bring the idea or concept to life, and if we can, we’ll always accommodate whatever they need.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhen did you start working with Bianca Spender?\r\n\t \r\nI met her for the first time a few years ago. She came here with a couple of her colleagues. She was genuinely excited about discovering us because she hadn’t done pleating before and could see this as a whole new aspect of her work. From that moment onwards, every season, she’s had some pleating in her range. Pleating adds a whole different dynamic to a garment. It could be a whole skirt or a little inset on a cuff or collar. It depends on the creativity a designer has. We work closely with Bianca and with her design team. She seems to attract and employ people who are very capable.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIt seems like you attract people who are artistically minded and creative. \r\n\t \r\nThe ones who are producing in this country are probably more likely to be that. On a personal level, I find it disappointing that most mainstream companies produce offshore. Most are large enough and expensive enough to do all or at least some of their production here, but for financial reasons, they choose to produce offshore because there’s a far bigger financial advantage. They’re focused on the bottom line.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tYou place a lot of importance on locally made and Australian manufacturing. Where does your passion stem from? \r\n\t \r\nI think whether it’s a fashion garment or a tin of tomatoes, you want to feel like you’re supporting your local community, even if the cost is a little more. I’ve made attempts to talk to people at an owner or senior design level at many companies to encourage them to produce here, but typically they don’t.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tI think that the collaborative aspect and tactile nature of working closely with craftsmen and artisans are really worthwhile.\r\n\t \r\nSome people are reassessing their position now that we had so many supply chain level issues with Covid. But people at the budget level of manufacturing are locked in. They’ve got no choice. If you’re selling a shirt for $40 and need to pay someone a legal living wage in this country, realistically, you’re not going to be making it here. But there are plenty of people reassessing it because, yes, you can make more money making it in China, but we can still make a living and justify making it here. Hopefully, the people at the higher price point will start making that decision.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tI think consumers are becoming much savvier, and the narrative element and storytelling behind the clothes they buy and wear are becoming more important.\r\n\t \r\nAnd isn’t it great to be able to put a label on your garment and say it is proudly made in Australia? There’s a sentimental aspect because I’ve been here over thirty years, and a practical aspect. If we close our humble little pleating factory, no one will ever reopen pleating in Australia. No one could invest the amount of money into the machinery, rent. It just wouldn’t make financial sense. Maybe someone with passion and interest will carry it on for us, but if not, the last remaining pleating factory in Australia will vanish.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you think a motivating factor was to keep the tradition of your family alive?\r\n\t \r\nIf we were motivated by the financial aspect of what we can make week-to-week, we wouldn’t still be around. But we’re not motivated by that. We’re comfortable, we’re happy, we don’t need anything more. My father, he’s been gone for nearly thirty years now, had a saying; ‘How much can you eat?’. He didn’t want to live in poverty, but he didn’t need excessive wealth in his life. If some larger companies were driven more by that mindset, there would be more local manufacturing.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIn Paris, there was a pleating workshop by Gerard-George Lognon, and when retired without an heir to take over, Chanel purchased it to keep the atelier’s traditional craft and skill alive. There’s a history of importance on craft and couture in France, which I wish we saw more of in Australia. \r\n\t \r\nThere are designers here in Australia who are placing importance on Australian manufacturing over profit. You can support local industry, and Bianca Spender is doing that, and I don’t think enough credit is given to the people who make that effort. These brands know they’d make more money manufacturing in China, but they choose not to. It’s a choice.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is inspiring your world at the moment? \r\n\t \r\nOver the last 30 years, we’ve encouraged and had many students come here on industry visits to see how the process works. Sometimes they’ll come back with their ideas about incorporating our facilities when creating their designs. We admire and are inspired by the young people coming through, new designers, often forging a new path. They’re always very excited to find there’s still someone who can meet their pleating requirements. That’s a really pleasurable aspect of the business, contributing to their education and development, I suppose. An influx of them come towards the end of the year when their collections are coming together. They’ll send us a couple invitations when they have their end of year parades, and we get to see the pleating that we’ve helped to create become these amazing garments. It’s inspiring to see.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tI’m sure they get a lot of inspiration visiting your space and feel excited that someone is keeping the craft alive. I imagine that they’re learning so much about the historical element of pleating too, and tradition. You guys are living that. \r\n\t \r\nTotally. We get people from all industries, dressmakers, Opera Australia, ballet companies or theatre companies. But students find us essential. They have no other choice, so it’s pleasurable to know we can assist them and contribute to their development. It’s good to feel needed. We worked really hard in the first 20 or 30 years to be where we are now. As I come to the end of my working life, I’m here because I want to be here. It’s a good place to be. The legacy that my family helped create, this modest little story, which eventually will come to an end. Hopefully, the pleating will continue, but I’m not so sure. But for as long as Marysia keeps enjoying her work, we’ll keep turning up and doing our thing.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Exquisite folds, delicate detailing and a meticulous making process; pleated garments exude a sensuality and movement that has forever fascinated the world of fashion. Over the course of history, the process of pleating has evolved under many artisan’s hands, with technology taking little reign. Human touch, tradition, curiosity, and entrusted knowledge are still at the heart of this exacting and time-honoured craft, with a lineage traced back to ancient Egypt. Handmade pleats decorated rulers’ tunics of silk, cotton and wool, disappearing once washed, only to be done all over again.”\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1906, 1905, 1904, 1903]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Let's talk about pleating","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/bianca-spender-pleating.jpg?t=1637124763"},"title":"Let's talk about pleating","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/lets-talk-about-pleating/"}
Let's talk about pleating

Let's talk about pleating

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"8th Oct 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Muse: Cody Greenwood\r\n\r\n\tCody Greenwood established Rush Films in late 2016 and has since earned herself a reputation as one of Australia’s most promising film producers, creating internationally acclaimed documentary and short films. Her work has taken her across the world, with a throughline of music, something she described as one of the greatest sources of conversation and influence in her household growing up. Her newly released feature documentary Under the Volcano, which premiered at SXSW, brings back the heady 80s music industry. It was an era when recording budgets were limitless, and some of the world’s most influential musical artists flew or sailed to George Martin’s music studio on the Caribbean Island, Montserrat. Tucked below a volcano, AIR Studios created a temporary island home to Sting, Elton John, Earth, Wind and Fire. Exploring creativity and liminal space, Martin said it best; “Everything has a period. You bring something out of nothing, and it always goes back to nothing.”\r\n\r\n\r\n\tWhile Cody is a patron of music, her scope of interest is comprehensive and refreshingly coincident with the times. She works alongside some of Australia’s most prominent and diverse storytellers to create authentic and thought-provoking cinema. Following its red carpet debut at CinefestOz Film Festival last month, her documentary Girl Like You is set to make its premiere at Raindance 2021 in London. Cody’s showreel is prodigious, and her field of vision acknowledges films that break boundaries and uncover stories that are felt and heard long after people watch them.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me a little about your upbringing? What is your family like?  \r\n\t Growing up, music and art were the greatest sources of conversation and influence amongst our household. My parents met in Bali in the '80s. Mum, originally from the US, was there making a documentary about the Indonesian artists in Ubud. My Dad, a local Freo boy and musician at the time, was managing a bar in Legian. Their whirlwind romance saw them move to London, where they had my brother Luke and I. They continued to live in the art world and today work as painters and writers. So much of what they taught came from travelling to far-flung places and being amongst the locals, listening to live music, and visiting exhibitions. I was incredibly lucky to have parents who looked for culture and connection in that world & encouraged us to do the same.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“I'm drawn to the unknown \r\n\tin the world       \r\n\tof documentary...\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\"I don't remember  \r\n\t\r\n\t a time\r\n\twhen I wasn't obsessed with film\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nHow would you best describe what you do professionally?  \r\n\tI love being asked this question because no one ever really knows what a film producer does. My role oscillates between the business of film - finance, deal-making, negotiation; to the creative elements- working with editors, directors, and cinematographers. In the early stages, when we only have a script or the beginnings of an idea, I drive the film's financing so that we can bring it to life. As we move towards production, I will work alongside the director to drive the vision of the film, bring in the best team, and work with investors. The multifaceted nature of the role is what I love most about producing.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you to filmmaking? Do you exclusively work in the realm of documentary film? \r\n\t \r\nI don't remember a time when I wasn't obsessed with film. One of my earliest memories is watching a film with my brother Luke on a family trip to New York. I work across both scripted and documentary films, and whilst I love both, I have a deep affection for documentary films. I'm drawn to the unknown in the world of documentary, walking onto a set and having no idea what you will get from the subject, and then looking at the realm of possibilities that exist when crafting the edit. There is also an element of education; constantly learning about the world through your subjects. And then, of course, trying to find ways to share that emotion and insight with the world is what I really love.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it?\r\n\t \r\nThe beginning and the end phases of filmmaking are my sweet spots. It's no secret amongst those I've worked with that the slow pace of being on set isn't so much for me. Where I find the most satisfaction is bringing everything together in those initial months; the challenge of financing a project and giving something structure has always come naturally. Then being able to sit in a dark room with an editor and director once we have wrapped shooting to workshop the story will always feel exciting.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat does a typical day look like for you? \r\n\t \r\nAs an incurable early riser, my most productive hours are 6-8 am. I wake and make coffee before sitting down to catch up on emails and then head to a Pilates class before going into the office. Across the course of a day, I will speak to directors, distributors, and writers, workshop ideas, and package films currently in production. When making a film, you quickly become immersed in the world of that subject matter. With Under the Volcano, that world was 1980's pop culture and music, so my office quickly became a shrine to this.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhy did you think the story of George Martin's AIR Studios was an important one to tell? \r\n\t \r\nWhen I first set out to make Under The Volcano, it was a personal story. I had grown up with the stories of AIR Studios in Montserrat. The importance of the film shifted over time from something personal to me to a story I felt needed to be shared with the world. The power of 'place' when it comes to creativity sits at the centre of Under the Volcano's story. The artists who escaped to the island did so with the belief that this hideaway provided a sort of sacred space —one where they could tap into their creative potential.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDid you feel like that would resonate with people experiencing lockdowns and isolation?\r\n\t \r\nThe last two years have forced us to reimagine/reinvent the corners of our spaces/places in entirely new ways; mourn them, miss them, and make way for new ones. For creativity and the arts, it has at times felt like a slow torture. For creatives, the world's new state of normal is here to stay & with it comes the chance to redefine how we create and connect going forward. Montserrat bred new heights of musical production technology, and already we are beginning to see similar evolutions across the arts as distance and travel continue to be restricted. As with any major world event, we are presented with an opportunity to reinvent the wheel and, in turn, parts of ourselves.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t“By the time it came to wrapping up under the Volcano, we were drawing eerie parallels with our subjects – farewelling a life that we knew and the places that we called upon in which to create. As an industry, it made us question whether we would be capable of continuing to create. It felt at times as though we would never be able to finish what we began as a team. However, what came of this forced change was not only an ability to adapt to this new world but a far deeper connection with the people around us.\"  \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires you professionally?\r\n\t \r\nThe opportunity to create content that shapes and shakes people. Films that break boundaries and uncover stories that are felt and heard long after people watch them. I also feel inspired to support and guide the next generation of Aussie talent so that they can thrive in our industry and be given the right opportunities to become world-class filmmakers.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWho do you create for? Is there an audience you have in mind during your process?\r\n\t \r\nMy ambition for Rush Films has always been to create high quality, international films with a distinct voice. So naturally, I've found myself creating for an audience who seek out stories of depth, diversity, and intrigue. Audience and story are so intertwined, and I've become significantly more selective in what I want to develop and who I want as part of the team. That will ultimately decide who my audience is.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style?\r\n\t \r\nRelaxed and minimalist. Jeans, a singlet, and sneakers are my day to day. But I love dressing up for an event. My go-to for this will often be structured suits or a statement dress.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you 'can't do without'?\r\n\t \r\nLV slides, a good pair of levis, and a vintage Fendi bag from my Grandmother's wardrobe. Her closet has given me most of my favourite pieces over the years.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat's next for you? What kind of stories do you think are essential to shed light on at this moment in time?\r\n\t \r\nIn November, my latest documentary Girl Like You will air on ABC. I worked on the film with an incredible team of female directors from Perth - Frances Elliott and Samantha Marlowe. The film was shot across six years and is a raw, intimate, and confronting insight into a young woman's experience as she transitions from male to female. I will also step into the drama realm over the coming year by developing two feature films to be filmed here in Western Australia.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat or who is inspiring your world at this moment?\r\n\t \r\nThe influx of Aussies returning from overseas who are hungry to make magic at home. The opportunity to collaborate with people from various industries whilst in Perth has been the silver lining for the last two years. From an industry perspective, female producers such as Liz Watts and Bruna Papandrea, who have carved their own pathway and are putting Australian voices on an international stage, are the ultimate inspiration for emerging Aussie filmmakers.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDescribe your workspace – where is it located, and what do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?\r\n\t \r\nI work from an office by the ocean in Cottesloe and have always needed light and space to work well. Being surrounded by like-minded people and an environment rich with ideas and collaboration is something I find so important to the creative process.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live?\r\n\t \r\nI live in Fremantle. My partner Gus and I bought a home last year in Byron Bay, and before COVID, our dream was to live between the two coasts. We met and lived in Indonesia and have always been drawn to living by the ocean. We love the pace of Byron Bay, but Fremantle has always been home. Having lived in LA and London, I'm looking forward to heading back overseas when the borders finally open.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tImages of Cody: Photographer: Ryan Murphy @telleragency / Make Up Artist: Jacinta Mcdonald @glossplus\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Cody Greenwood established Rush Films in late 2016 and has since earned herself a reputation as one of Australia’s most promising film producers, creating internationally acclaimed documentary and short films. Her work has taken her across the world, with a throughline of music, something she described as one of the greatest sources of conversation and influence in her household growing up. Her newly released feature documentary Under the Volcano, which premiered at SXSW, brings back the heady 80s music industry. It was an era when recording budgets were limitless, and some of the world’s most influential musical artists flew or sailed to George Martin’s music studio on the Caribbean Island, Montserrat. Tucked below a volcano, AIR Studios created a temporary island home to Sting, Elton John, Earth, Wind and Fire. Exploring creativity and liminal space, Martin said it best; “Everything has a period. You bring something out of nothing, and it always goes back to nothing.”\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1344, 1764, 1710, 1518, 221]","tags":[{"name":"Muses","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Muses"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Muse: Cody Greenwood","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/cody-greenwood-47-of-66-.jpg?t=1633689737"},"title":"Muse: Cody Greenwood","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/muse-cody-greenwood/"}
Muse: Cody Greenwood

Muse: Cody Greenwood

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"1st Oct 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Clementine Stoney Maconachie\r\n\tClementine Stoney Maconachie is a sculptor of precise and evocative works. She grew up on a big hill outside Albury with her parents, grandmother, and an ever-expanding garden. Clementine was born of artistic lineage, surrounded by her mother's abstract and landscape oil paintings, and credits the creative immersion of her childhood as a key influence in her art.\r\nHer work is centred on simplicity, embracing imperfection, and the contrast of hard materials with soft shapes. Clementine predominantly sculpts with metal and stone, and in 2015, founded the creative agency The Visuals. In conversation with Clementine, we discuss her seeking inspiration in \"Isamu Noguchi, Barbara Hepworth, Henri Matisse, Frida Kahlo, and all the amazing women who came before and did awesome things.\" And Clementine notes she is often hit with ideas in moments of in-between, when driving, waiting, or daydreaming. Clementine channels her life's energy into art and family, and we were humbled to talk with this grounded and impassioned woman.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"An idea can strike  \r\n\tanywhere often when driving, waiting for something, or just daydreaming.\"\r\n“I have a large amount of \r\n\t\r\n\tshiny,    \r\n\t\r\n\tsparkly,\r\n\tfancy clothes\r\n\tfor a life I don't lead.“\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n What drew you to the practice of sculpture?  \r\n\t I’m not sure what originally drew me to sculpture. I grew up surrounded by art and sculpture. For as long as I can remember I have been drawn to sculptures. I love contemporary art, but I didn’t study art at school, choosing workshop instead, which I adored.\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it?\r\n\t \r\nI enjoy everything about it. I just love turning an idea into a physical object. It's very satisfying.\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires your creative practice?\r\n\t \r\nOh, so much. I definitely get inspired by materials. If I come across a building material or anything that I haven’t used before, I love thinking of the different things I could create with it.\r\nShape, line and contrast are the other things that inspire me. It always comes back down to these things, and the relationship between them.\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live?\r\n\t \r\nI live in a little terrace in Edgecliff in Sydney’s eastern suburbs. It fronts onto a park which is really calming and especially incredible being that it’s so close to the city.\r\n\t“Shape, line and contrast are the other things that inspire me. It always comes back down to these things, and the relationship between them.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat does a typical day look like for  you?\r\n\t \r\nA busy breakfast with the five of us getting ready and out the door. I drop the kids, Maximilla, Hendrix, and Matisse, to school. I then continue to my studio in Alexandria and get to work or play. If I'm in the studio, I am making. It's a short day in the studio, so there are not many breaks, as I need to be back for school pick up. But I have two longer days thanks to some after school activities. On those days I can really get into the zone.\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape?\r\n\t \r\nI think in challenging times there is opportunity if you look for it and have the capacity to adapt.I feel like a lot of creativity has come out of this crazy period in our lives. For me personally, it changed my business. It pushed me to do the things I really wanted to do, but was not able to be all-in with, due to taking on other work and projects.\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style?\r\n\t \r\nIt’s pretty eclectic. I have a good range of staple wardrobe pieces that I have collected over years. I then have a few fun statement pieces. I have a large amount of shiny, sparkly, fancy clothes for a life I don't lead. They’re there just in case, so I’m all set if I get invited at the last minute to a black tie event, an opening, or some other formal occasion.\r\n\t\r\n\tWho are some of your favourite designers (local and international)?\r\n\t \r\nLocally, I love Esse Studios, Matteau, Sir the Label, Macgraw, Camilla and Marc, ARTCLUB, Sarah-Jane Clark, Lee Matthews and Kit X. Internationally, The Row, Celine and Dries Van Norten\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you ‘can’t do without’?\r\n\t \r\nA great pair of jeans, leather jacket, perfectly worn t-shirt. I love a classic, well-made, quality staple piece. Then I need something with a bit more personality, like a kimono, some interesting sunglasses, something a little extra.\r\n\t\r\n\tWho are your idols?\r\n\t \r\nIsamu Noguchi, Barbara Hepworth, Henri Matisse, Frida Kahlo, and all the amazing women who came before and did awesome things.\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat or who is currently inspiring your world at the moment (music, art, literature, etc) \r\n\t \r\nMargel Hinder, the Australian-American modernist sculptor. I just finished the books ‘Mythos’ and ‘Heroes’ by Stephen Fry, so all things surrounding Greek mythology. I’m also looking forward to seeing what Cj Hendry does for her ‘STRAYA’ show.\r\n\t\r\n\tDescribe your workspace - where is it located and what do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?\r\n\t \r\nMy studio is located in Alexandria in Sydney’s Inner west. I don’t need much to feel creatively motivated, just materials or offcuts, so that when I think of something I can test it out straight away. It does mean the studio is always full of bits and pieces, but often it's just looking at one of those bits in a different way which will be the catalyst for the next series.\r\n\t\r\nCan you take me through the creative and physical process in making one of your works, from inception to the final piece.\r\n\t \r\nAn idea can strike anywhere, often when driving, waiting for something, or just daydreaming. Then it sort of just floats around in my head for a while.  If it happens in the studio, I usually try to make it straight away,  but otherwise it evolves in my head until I have a chance to realise it or test it out. Today I had one while waiting for a doctor's appointment. I made it this afternoon, and now I can feel a whole series coming on. Other ideas are still waiting patiently to get made. Then there are other sculptures that seem to just happen with little or no plan. They come out of holding something in my hands, and just playing, or testing if something will work.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Clementine Stoney Maconachie is a sculptor of precise and evocative works. She grew up on a big hill outside Albury with her parents, grandmother, and an ever-expanding garden. Clementine was born of artistic lineage, surrounded by her mother's abstract and landscape oil paintings, and credits the creative immersion of her childhood as a key influence in her art. \r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/kitty-clark/\r\n        - /musings/what-you-need-to-know-about-fabric-dyeing/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-merino-wool/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1797, 1796, 1795]","tags":[{"name":"portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Artist in Residence: Clementine Stoney Maconachie","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/clemstudio-1.jpeg?t=1633073863"},"title":"Artist in Residence: Clementine Stoney Maconachie","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/artist-in-residence-clementine-stoney-maconachie/"}
Artist in Residence: Clementine Stoney Maconachie

Artist in Residence: Clementine Stoney Maconachie

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"24th Sep 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Let’s talk about Vegan Leather\r\n\tVegan leather goes by many monikers; faux leather, pleather, leatherette, alternative leather and synthetic leather. It’s easy to assume that ‘vegan leather’ is the most commonly used on the labels of our clothes due to its moralistic connotations. The growing adoption of vegan leather in the accessories, ready to wear, and luxury fashion market has been a watershed moment for those living with the dichotomy of loving leather while equally concerned with the welfare of animals. The global vegan leather market is predicted to be worth a staggering $85 billion within the next decade. As a relatively new material, vegan leather sits towards the top of an industry riddled by inconsistency, irregularity and ambiguity. It is made under a range of methods from even more sources, both natural and synthetic. Not all vegan leathers are created equal.\r\n\t\r\n\tThis is Part II of our Leather Diptych. It’s impossible to talk about vegan leather without covering what it is an alternative for, being animal leather, most commonly made from the skin of cows. Part I covered the challenges and our advice for shopping real leather sustainably and ethically. Now, for Part II, we discuss its vegan alternative.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n             \"Apple, mushroom, cactus and mango \r\n\tare increasingly being used to create sustainable vegan leather substitutes.\"\r\n\t\"Vegetable-based leather is \r\n\tbecoming a leader\r\n\t\r\n\tin the \r\n\talternative\r\n\tleather\r\n\t market...\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAs we covered in our leather learning, the reasons for brands and consumers opting out of real leather are multifaceted; the material poses issues concerning animal welfare, human rights and the wellbeing of our planet. Real fur has been all but cancelled; meanwhile, leather has been a slower fade. Leather is less explicit, meaning consumers are able to divorce the material from its animal source. However, in recent years, stringent laws regarding the production and usage of real leather are propelling the demand for its synthetic counterpart. Animal rights lobbying from groups like PETA and WWF has also increased consumer and industry discomfort with real leather.\r\n\t\r\n\t\tFrom Stella McCartney, cult-favourite Telfar, to Bianca Spender, many luxury brands have taken an unwavering stance against the use of real leather in their designs. Australian designer Bianca Spender explains that animal rights and environmental concerns were key factors in the label’s decision to use vegan leather.\r\n\t\r\n\t“Our focus as a business has always been on ethical practices, and I’m always seeking change to make sure people and our planet come first. Our core focus is on reducing the impact of climate change through the reduction of our carbon footprint. Our decision to use leatherette has been influenced by the environmental impacts the meat industry has on the Earth, and animal welfare is also a part of it.” Bianca Spender\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\t“Our focus as a business has always been on ethical practices, and I’m always seeking change to make sure people and our planet come first. Our core focus is on reducing the impact of climate change through the reduction of our carbon footprint. Our decision to use leatherette has been influenced by the environmental impacts the meat industry has on the Earth, and animal welfare is also a part of it.”\r\n\t\r\n\tThose working within the fashion industry are starting to see the advantages of utilising vegan alternatives. Its application is getting nearer to genuine leather, replacing its use in crafting handbags, briefcases, car furnishings and clothing at a pacing rate. Synthetic leather materials offer some superior properties, such as high gloss finish, durability, strength, UV resistance, and easy maintenance. Paired with the lower cost of producing animal-free goods, with an estimated one-third of the cost of leather, it’s also more accessible to everyday consumers.\r\n\t\r\n\tHowever, when assessing the credentials of synthetic leather, we need to look at its raw properties and how it’s made. Simply swapping out leather for any vegan alternative does not solve all the problems of the leather industry. Yes, animal welfare issues no longer stand, but the material a designer chooses can significantly alter the vegan leather garment's carbon footprint and environmental impact.\r\n\t\r\n\tA vast majority of vegan leather on the market is made from the plastic polymers most commonly used due to their wrinkled texture, which helps to give the effect of real leather. Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) is a widely used plastic polymer because of its affordability. It is a material you’ll commonly find in cheap leather products. The plastic is softened with chemicals called plasticisers, and PVC is made with approximately 57% chloride and 43% carbons, which comes from oil, gas or petrol. Being predominantly made with fossil fuels and heavy chemical treatments, PVC poses severe environmental issues.\r\n\t\r\n\tIncreasingly preferred by the fashion industry is Polyurethane (PU), which is less sticky and can retain body heat. PU is made with a more regulated chemical process and biodegrades faster than PVC, which can take upwards of 500 years to decompose. Even then, PVC breaks down into micro-beads which get washed into our oceans.\r\n\t\r\n\t For this reason, It’s been argued that vegan leather is worse than using real leather, which is a natural textile that biodegrades. But this does fail to consider the ways leather contributes to climate change, land devastation, pollution and water contamination (all of which we covered in Part I of our Leather Diptych). Marked skin and the irregular shape of animal hides can also mean 20 to 30 per cent of animal skins go to waste, something vegan leather prevents. The 2018 Environmental Profit & Loss report by Kering states that the impact of vegan leather production can be up to a third lower than real leather.\r\n\t\r\n\tMany designers, including our labels Bianca Spender and Strateas Carlucci, are choosing to use remnant or recycled plastic polymers to tackle animal rights and sustainability issues. Bianca explains that,\r\n\t\r\n\t“One of the biggest environmental impacts of the fashion industry is the production of raw materials. We incorporate remnant fabrics where possible and as the first port of call. 50% of the fabrics we use across the range are remnants, which have been overproduced and would have otherwise been destroyed. A significant portion of our leatherette comes from remnants.”\r\n\t\r\n\tThat being said, some designers do see a drawback in the functionality of vegan leather for certain products. Strateas Carlucci, who uses vegan leather for their main collections, has been opting for the real thing when crafting their luxury accessories.\r\n\t\r\n\t“The Meta Bag is our very first leather accessory. Being our first item in this category, we wanted to launch with an accessory which would be a functional, quality product. As we had a specific design in mind, we ended up using leather due to the structural integrity of the bag.”\r\n\t\r\n\t However, Strateas Carlucci are working towards using vegan leather wherever possible.\r\n\t\r\n\t“Although it’s currently made from calf leather, like our main collection, our plan is to grow this category and introduce vegan alternatives… We are currently in the process of designing a second release, which will include a softer, more un-structured design, whereby a vegan leather alternative will be perfectly suited.”\r\n\t\r\n\t Many mid-high end fashion houses are hesitant to adopt vegan leather due to customer perception. Leather is renowned for its longevity. New materials, often used in fast fashion, have somewhat hindered the reputation of vegan leather accessories and clothing.\r\n\t\r\n\t“Being a new category, we did have some concerns around customer-perception around the use of vegan and real leather, and we knew there would be an argument for each side.”\r\n\t\r\n\tVegan leather seemed to be coasting for a few years, but being cruelty-free yet unsustainable is no longer enough to satisfy educated consumers and designers. There have been fascinating developments for viable, consistent, transparent alternatives to the animal trade entering the market in the last few years.\r\n\t\r\n\tVegetable-based leather is becoming a leader in the vegan leather market, being lighter in its environmental impact and maintaining a cruelty-free process. Apple, mushroom, cactus and mango are sources for leather substitutes that are manufactured without the same toxic chemicals used in leather tanning and PVC production. Rapid industrialisation and constant research and development in this area are starting to transform the industry. Several of our own labels are making efforts to remain informed and agile with their collections. Bianca Spender explains that,\r\n\t\r\n\t “Leather alternatives are an area of innovation that is still being explored globally. We’re looking at some leather alternatives ourselves – pineapple, apple, mushroom and cactus leather can provide a similar look and feel to leather; however, the quality and longevity of the fabrics are still in their exploratory stages.”\r\n\t\r\n\t Our soon to launch label A_C Official has launched a Desserto Cactus Leather collection. They are the first Australian brand to produce a collection from this innovative cactus-based leather, preferring it for its environmental benefits and functionality. A_C Official’s Creative Director Tessa Carrol describes that “[C]acti fields are a huge carbon sink which means the growing process alone is a great help when sequestering carbon from the atmosphere.” The plants themselves are also never removed from the Earth, which aids carbon capture.\r\n\t\r\n\t Mushroom leather is also in the development stages. It’s a natural resource that can be grown on sawdust or agricultural waste, meaning it is not region-specific for farming and utilises waste to create something productive. Luxury brands seem to be heading the front in R&D for this new material, as they tend to be focused on quality, differentiation and know the competitive advantage of good PR. MycoWorks, the company Hermès is partnering with, closed a $45 million series B funding round last year.\r\n\t\r\n\t It’s a complex issue, one rich in nuances and contradictions. But as a general rule, keep in mind transparency, visibility and sustainability. Always try to purchase from brands that are transparent around their sourcing. If the information is not available on their website, they’re likely not following best practice. And when you choose vegan leather, don’t choose brands that use virgin plastic. Opt for recycled plastic polymers or vegetable-based leather. The best option is to do your research as thoroughly as possible on a case by case basis to help you make informed choices. Find out who you’re giving your money to and whether it’s something you want to support, regardless of the latest trends or aesthetics, unless it’s a mushroom leather trend. We’re on board for that.\r\n\t\r\n\tSources:\r\n\tA_C Official\r\n\tKering\r\n\tThe Guardian\r\n\tHarpers Bazaar\r\n\tGrand View Research\r\n\tHarpers Bazaar\r\n\tPlant Based News\r\n\tGrand View Research\r\n\tThe Sydney Morning Herald\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Vegan leather goes by many monikers; faux leather, pleather, leatherette, alternative leather and synthetic leather. It’s easy to assume that ‘vegan leather’ is the most commonly used on the labels of our clothes due to its moralistic connotations.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-linen/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1613,1616,1615,786,431,1386]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Let's Talk About Vegan Leather","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/v-parallax-3-asset-10.jpg?t=1632468591"},"title":"Let's Talk About Vegan Leather","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/lets-talk-about-vegan-leather/"}
Let's Talk About Vegan Leather

Let's Talk About Vegan Leather

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"9th Sep 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Ginger & Smart\r\n\r\n\tFounded in 2002 by Sydney-based sisters Alexandra and Genevieve Smart, Ginger & Smart designs for spirited women whose style is an expression of their individuality. A sense of cool confidence and discovery underpins the Ginger & Smart design aesthetic, deftly combining the polished and the playful aspects of a woman. We have come to expect beautifully considered and timeless pieces from the label, but dig a little deeper, and there is a throughline of social responsibility and respect for the planet in everything they create. From their approach to design, fabric selection and manufacturing partners, Ginger & Smart live by three pillars; sustainability, ethical trading and giving back to the community. As part of introducing the label to the Showroom-X family, we met with Genevieve Smart to discuss inspiration, sustainable practice and hopes for what lies ahead. In conversation with Genevieve, her reverence for the industry to which she has dedicated her life and optimism for its future speak volumes.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tIt’s beautiful that you two sisters have built something meaningful together… What was your upbringing like?  \r\n\tWe spent much of our early childhood in the UK. Our parents were in book publishing, so we were surrounded by creative artists and writers from a young age. There are three Smart sisters; Eloise, Alexandra and I. We were all educated in Sydney.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"The clothes we wear are one of the truest forms of \r\n\tself-expression and a reflection of the world in which we      \r\n\tlive.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"I enjoy the  \r\n\t\r\n\thuman\r\n\telement of fashion.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nHow would you best describe what you do professionally?  \r\n\t I’m Creative Director and Designer for Ginger & Smart, so I lead the creative and design the collections. Alex is Managing Director, and she would be described as a creative business leader.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you both to fashion design? \r\n\t \r\nAs a young teen, I knew I was going to be a fashion designer. I’ve often wondered what drew me to it so strongly. I’ve always loved the transformative and intuitive element of fashion. Alex worked in fashion magazines and was the first editor of Oyster magazine, so she also had a passion for the industry.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me a little about Ginger & Smart. What motivated you to start the label?\r\n\t \r\nAt the heart of it, we wanted to create something meaningful - A brand that combined luxury, sustainability and a legacy we could be proud of. We knew our completely different skill sets together could create something special together.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it? \r\n\t \r\nI enjoy the human element of fashion. The clothes we wear are one of the truest forms of self-expression and a reflection of the world in which we live. Fashion design takes intuition and comes from a sixth sense of what will resonate months before its release. When a design lands and customers really feel it... that’s the moment.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style?\r\n\t \r\nPragmatically femme.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you ‘can’t do without’?\r\n\t \r\nI live in our Edition 3 blazer. I wear it a few sizes too big to amplify the oversized feel. Our Collective leather track pants are also on rotation in my wardrobe in tan and black. All these core Ginger & Smart pieces pair effortlessly with our new season prints and colours and are perennial.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat role do colour and print have in your designs?\r\n\t \r\nPrints are how we tell the story of the collection and often where it all begins. Our prints are never conventional. A floral will always have a twist. This season, the Night Grass print began as photographs of wet grass taken on a phone during a moonlit walk in the Summer lockdown. The tiny grass flowers were ginger coloured under the moon. Our colour palette has always been a way to set the temperature for the collection.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t“The fabric content in a garment has the greatest impact on the planet, so sustainable sourcing is non-negotiable.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWho do you design for? \r\n\t \r\nThe Ginger & Smart customer is a spirited woman whose style is an expression of her individuality. We design for women who appreciate quality and longevity and to whom sustainability is essential. She is drawn to print and colour and loves the feel of silk on her skin.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow do you ensure a high standard of ethical practise is upheld?\r\n\t \r\nWe only work with global suppliers who have transparent ethical policies regarding their impact on people and the planet and who are regularly audited. Locally we engage in the process of an audit on our ethical practices with ECA. It’s a great process for full transparency across the business.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tYou also focus on selecting sustainable fabrics. What is your ethos and method for having a sustainable approach to design? \r\n\t \r\nThe fabric content in a garment has the greatest impact on the planet, so sustainable sourcing is non-negotiable. It’s at the core of what we do, from the linings to labels, zipper tapes and buttons. They are mostly recycled or from sustainable materials. We approach design with longevity as a high priority through enduring quality but also in style. We hope our pieces stay in our customers’ wardrobes for years and are handed down with love.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat are some changes you’ve noted in the fashion industry in recent times?\r\n\t \r\nDiversity, sustainability and social responsibility are now becoming business as usual for most leading Australian designers. Designers realise that we can influence social change by setting the right standards within our businesses and advocating for change.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape? \r\n\t \r\nI’m excited about the new generation of First Nation fashion designers in Australia and the stories of their connection to Country.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity? Something within the realm of design or dressing that feels innately Australian?\r\n\t \r\nThere is a sense of space and connection to the landscape and the light, which I see reflected in Australian design, particularly architecture and interior design. Australian design isn’t so tied to conventional ideas, so we can break the rules and be bold and inventive.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat or who is inspiring your world at this moment? And what inspires you professionally? \r\n\t \r\nBeauty and learning inspire me. At this moment in time, the Arts, kindness and good leadership are particularly inspiring.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat does luxury mean to you?  \r\n\t \r\nTime is a luxury to me. Sustainability is luxury. It takes time to create things that don’t take from the precious resources of future generations. Time with my loved ones is also priceless.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhere is your studio located? Is there anything you need around you to feel creatively motivated? \r\n\t \r\nOur studio is in Rosebery in Sydney. In usual times it’s full of the buzzing infectious energy of our team that I’ve really missed in lockdown. But I always design remotely in Avalon with my fabrics, a mannequin, an Apple pen, and Procreate. Music motivates me when I’m designing, so I’m forever trading playlists with friends.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live? \r\n\t \r\nI live in Avalon on Sydney’s Northern Beaches. In lockdown, it’s hard to recall a typical day. Right now, my day starts with some form of mental or physical exercise in nature, followed by a strong coffee. Most days, I’m working on the collection or creative directing shoots remotely or on an endless procession of Zooms with my team. I try to break for a sunset walk with a friend at Palm Beach to capture the last beauty of the day. The sunset is wildly different every day, which somehow reminds me that every day is different.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Founded in 2002 by Sydney-based sisters Alexandra and Genevieve Smart, Ginger & Smart designs for spirited women whose style is an expression of their individuality. A sense of cool confidence and discovery underpins the Ginger & Smart design aesthetic, deftly combining the polished and the playful aspects of a woman. We have come to expect beautifully considered and timeless pieces from the label, but dig a little deeper, and there is a throughline of social responsibility and respect for the planet in everything they create. From their approach to design, fabric selection and manufacturing partners, Ginger & Smart live by three pillars; sustainability, ethical trading and giving back to the community. As part of introducing the label to the Showroom-X family, we met with Genevieve Smart to discuss inspiration, sustainable practice and hopes for what lies ahead. In conversation with Genevieve, her reverence for the industry to which she has dedicated her life and optimism for its future speak volumes. \r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1784, 1783, 1781, 1755, 1758]","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Ginger & Smart","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/ginger-smart-blog-tile.jpg?t=1631244257"},"title":"Ginger & Smart","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/ginger-smart/"}
Ginger & Smart

Ginger & Smart

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"7th Sep 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Anya Brock\r\n\r\n\tAnya Brock is an Australian painter who has quickly gained notoriety for her spirited and bold use of colour and strokes. Effervescent, pragmatic and unreserved, Anya is a woman who contains multitudes. Her energy is contagious and flows through her painted works which are recognisably figurative without entering realism. She identifies strongly with the abstract expressionists of 1950's America. A self-proclaimed hermit, Anya has perfected the balance of planting her feet in reality while keeping her head in the clouds. Anya lives in South Fremantle with her husband and two children and dedicates her life to her family and art. And a short description of her personal style has us wanting to raid her wardrobe. Speaking with Anya reminds us to take risks, be bold, and embrace wonder in our daily lives.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tTell me a little about your upbringing.  \r\n\t I was brought up in a very stable and normal middle-class family in Alfred Cove. My parents owned their own business called Chair Repair which, as you can guess, fixed chairs! So we always went to the workshop after school and made things out of scrap wood and fabric. I think we were encouraged to make things out of what we had instead of buying shiny new things. My sister and I have always been makers with entrepreneurial spirits.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Without it, I’d be completely lost. It also teaches me discipline but equally allows me to \r\n\tescape      \r\n\tthe realities of being an adult human being and mother.\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\"Rationality is thrown out and \r\n\t\r\n\t in its place is \r\n\tproblem-solving \r\n\t risk-taking, wonder and bold moves.\"\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nHow would you best describe what you do professionally?  \r\n\tI’d say I’m a painter, but I’m also a designer and businesswoman. I generally swap between any of these identities depending on what day of the week it is and where the moon is at. I bounce between abstraction and figuration and try to involve a little of each in everything I do.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you to painting? \r\n\t \r\nI actually didn’t love painting in high school. Mainly because we were taught very traditional techniques, and that didn’t interest me. I then studied fashion textiles at TAFE. We had a pretty loose drawing lecturer called John Greuw. He taught us super experimental mark-making, like taking away our paintbrushes and giving us jars and forks to paint with. He also made us make our paintbrushes out of our own hair. I loved this irreverent approach. The idea that perfection is the enemy opened up a light and enjoyable way of creating for me. Knowing that accidents or mistakes are what give an artwork character was incredibly freeing. It meant that I could create (and live) courageously, knowing that everything is just problem-solving. Nothing is futile.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires you professionally?\r\n\t \r\nI think, like most artists, I find “the professional world” a weird place to be. I guess I’ve always felt like “being a professional” is somewhat of an act because, in reality, I’m a child. So I don’t really think about what inspires me in that space. I just try not to be too inappropriate.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity? Something within the realm of design or dressing that feels innately Australian? \r\n\t \r\nI think there’s a colour palette that is quintessentially Australian and an aesthetic expansivity that can only be a result of our spacious terrain. I think we embrace colour and comfort, which translates into a laid back approachability.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style?\r\n\t \r\nAggressive pattern clashing, considering silhouettes and absolute embracing of colour.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you ‘can’t do without’?\r\n\t \r\nI’m fairly transient with clothes. There are a few pieces that I keep coming back to season after season- a heavy, vintage, embroidered jacket with faux fur collar that we affectionately refer to as “the couch” and my collection of flared pants that I make from ridiculous fabrics. My day bag (when not painting) is a printed Ganni tote, and my cross-body green Gucci still seems the most appropriate bag from most evening ensembles these days. So, in short, there’s probably 10-15 pieces I can’t do without, and these will likely be different next season.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is inspiring your world at this moment?\r\n\t \r\nColour-wise, I’m obsessing over warm hues; terracotta, rust, nude, apricot. Perhaps it’s a reaction to this endless cold weather or the collective interior aesthetic, which is heading in this direction (and has been for some time- I take a while to cotton on). I’m also exploring super large scale abstracts inspired by Brancusian shapes and a feeling of lazy Mediterranean afternoons as well as large cropped florals- loose and textural. Sonically I’m loving Ngaiire’s new album and, slightly more embarrassingly, the Vivo soundtrack. Lin-Manuel Miranda is a genius.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t“The idea that perfection is the enemy opened up a light and enjoyable way of creating for me. Knowing that accidents or mistakes are what give an artwork character was incredibly freeing. It meant that I could create (and live) courageously, knowing that everything is just problem-solving. Nothing is futile.”  \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me a little about your relationship with the natural world.\r\n\t \r\nI often forget about nature. I literally have visual diaries from when I was younger saying, “I forgot about nature”. I’m a workaholic who’s addicted to productivity, so I rarely carve out time to just be in nature. Having kids helps with that as you’re often doing something out in the elements. We just bought a farm down south, so there’s much more time walking through paddocks, finding animal bones.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live?\r\n\t \r\nWe live in South Fremantle, which we love. We also have two small children, so our day usually starts anywhere between 5-6 am, which is either a brutal beginning or a luxurious sleep-in depending on where it falls on that scale. I work four days a week, and my husband and I share the school drop off and pickups, so I usually get around 6 hours of work in on most days. These vary between adult-like-admin such as quoting on jobs, putting together proposals, general website upkeep, editing images and my painting days, where I disappear into my own world and try not to partake in too much rational behaviour. I find, more than ever, it’s important to really separate these mindsets as they’re two completely different humans that are non-transferable. After school, I have to play anywhere between 2 and 12 games of UNO with Harry and usually a dance or tea party with Luella. Then I drink two glasses of Chardonnay while I watch my husband cook dinner and discuss whether it’s food reactions or the current moon that is making our kids crazy. I bathe the kids, Ross cleans the kitchen, kids are in bed by 7 pm, and we retire to tv and chocolate on the couch. Bedtime is around 9 pm. Rosco and I share all the parenting and house roles fairly evenly, which I love.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDescribe your workspace – where is it located, and what do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?\r\n\t \r\nI’m at the Pakenham St Artist Studios in Fremantle, which is not unlike a large prison cell with high windows and the occasional pigeon. I’ve been there for ten years now, so I know how to ride out the icy winters and oven-like summers. My studio is generally a total mess which sometimes helps and sometimes hinders my process. I need something inspiring in my ears to start painting- an album I’m obsessed with or a movie that moves me. Then I’ll usually move onto something slightly trashier for the afternoon. It’s like an afternoon treat to myself when I’m less energetic and just want to be entertained.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Anya Brock is an Australian painter who has quickly gained notoriety for her spirited and bold use of colour and strokes. Effervescent, pragmatic and unreserved, Anya is a woman who contains multitudes. Her energy is contagious and flows through her painted works which are recognisably figurative without entering realism. She identifies strongly with the abstract expressionists of 1950's America. A self-proclaimed hermit, Anya has perfected the balance of planting her feet in reality while keeping her head in the clouds. Anya lives in South Fremantle with her husband and two children and dedicates her life to her family and art. And a short description of her personal style has us wanting to raid her wardrobe. Speaking with Anya reminds us to take risks, be bold, and embrace wonder in our daily lives.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1673, 1678, 1676, 1674]","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Artist in Residence: Anya Brock","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/189090040-290166886103403-3169482135244637754-n.jpg?t=1631003787"},"title":"Artist in Residence: Anya Brock","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/artist-in-residence-anya-brock/"}
Artist in Residence: Anya Brock

Artist in Residence: Anya Brock

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"3rd Sep 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Let’s talk about Leather\r\n\r\n\tBoots, bags, briefcases, car seats, wallets; Start looking for leather, and you'll find it everywhere. Leather is one of man's earliest and most valuable materials, unique for its strength, stretch and warmth. Not to mention its aesthetic appeal and links to powerful cultural archetypes and icons; Robert Mapplethorpe, Marianne Faithful, Mel Gibson as Mad Max. Dressing in leather is synonymous with subcultures of the rebellious, sexy and tough. But sub no more, leather's gone mainstream.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tToday, the global leather goods business is worth over $100 billion a year, with roughly half of all leather produced used to make shoes and about 25% for clothing. As a resource derived from an animal source, it's impossible to talk about leather without discussing animal ethics. Less obvious are the human rights issues and environmental impact involved in creating the material. This is Part I of a two-part series. Next week we cover Vegan Leather, a similarly complex industry that is only getting more intriguing. But for now, to help you buy leather pieces with consideration and care, we’re talking about real leather.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n             It is estimated\r\n\t that 17,000 litres of water are required to make 1kg of leather.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tProducing leather\r\n\t\r\n\tis a resource-intensive\r\n\t\r\n\t process\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tOur ancestors used leather to protect themselves from the elements. The process of creating leather is dependent on animal skins. Many animal species are used to make leather - pigs, goats, sheep, crocodiles - but most commonly, leather comes from the hide of cows. And if you've read anything about the meat industry, you're already familiar with the reputation the cattle industry has for wreaking havoc on the natural world.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\tRaising and slaughtering the billions of animals whose skins sustain the leather industry each year can be inefficient, cruel and comes with huge environmental impact. A rising global middle class has bolstered the demand for leather goods and the farming of cows. Around 290 million cows are killed annually, and the global herd is approaching 1 billion. It's projected that in order to keep us accessorised with leather wallets, handbags and shoes, the industry will have a yearly slaughter of 430 million cows by 2025.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t“Legacy brand R.M. Williams has been creating leather goods since 1932 and offer full transparency on their website as to where they source their materials.”\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\tProducing leather is a resource-intensive process, driven by land use, greenhouse gas emissions, and vast water use. It is estimated that 17,000 litres of water are required to make 1kg of leather. Cattle ranching is the world's largest user of agricultural land. The Brazilian cattle industry alone is responsible for 14% of the world's annual deforestation, primarily the Amazon rainforest. The Amazon is home to about three million species of plants and animals and one million indigenous people. It is a vital carbon store that slows down the pace of global warming, and biodiversity loss and climate change directly result from the growing demand for cattle rearing.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTraditional leather supply chains can be long and challenging to manage. We buy leather goods without knowing where the hide originates or the conditions the animals lived through. If all the ‘Italian leather’ goods were truly reared in Italy, you’d be pushing through cows for a better view of the Duomo. This stamp most often indicates that the piece was merely finished in Italy. In reality, nearly half of the global leather trade is carried out in developing countries, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, and Cambodia, which have negligent environmental regulations and safety protocols for workers. These conditions put workers' health at risk and cause the exploitation of animals and humans alike.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tThe process of turning raw hide into leather is a hazardous and polluting business. A great deal of energy and chemicals are needed to transform the skin into the leather material we know so well. From the farm to the end product, the list of toxic chemicals used to make leather is daunting. It involves pesticides, chromium salts, tanning liquor, sulphide, acidic effluents and many more noxious substances, all of which are harmful to people and the environment.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tOnce an animal's skin is removed, chemicals are used to break down protein in the raw hide. This process is known as ‘tanning’ and prevents the skin from decomposing. Without proper regulation and safety protocols inside factories, the chemicals used in the tanning process are incredibly harmful to leatherworkers. Worldwide, the majority of leather tanneries use chrome, most commonly in developing countries, where workers breathe in and have direct contact with chrome daily.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tAustralian label Ginger & Smart use real leather sourced from New Zealand and have taken a stance against chrome tanning, stating that,\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t \"Chrome tanning is still the main method used by 85% of tanneries as it is quick and cost-effective. But the hidden cost of chrome tanning is with the toxic wastewater that can seep into the ground and affect soil and groundwater, often harming the people in nearby villages.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tLeatherworkers face health consequences from working in tanneries, from debilitating skin conditions to bronchitis, pneumonia, cancer and permanent blindness. Due to the levels of toxic chemicals in the soil, Environmental Protection Agencies deem previous leather tannery sites as defunct for a period after their use, much like a petrol station. The sites are rendered infertile, restricting our ability to grow anything or safely live in the area until they are regenerated.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tGinger & Smart opt for vegetable tanning, an increasingly popular alternative to chrome. Purchasing vegetable tanned leather is significantly less harmful to the planet, and you guarantee that workers have not been in contact with hazardous chemicals. When the garment reaches the end of its life, vegetable tanned leather is decomposable and does not leach toxins into the soil.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tThe animals' livelihood also needs to be taken into account. For brands to use leather for high-end, luxury goods, the animal's skin must be pristine. Animals are often confined to small, barren enclosures to prevent damage to their hide. These pens have been described by reptile experts as “overly-restrictive, understimulating and inhumane”. Marked skin and the irregular shape of animal hides can mean 20 to 30 per cent of animal skins regularly go to waste.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIt is unlikely that the world's ever-increasing consumer population will be dissuaded from buying leather altogether. Part of the solution is to exclusively source leather that is a by-product. Many tanneries reclaim hides from the meat industry to prevent waste, which encourages a closed-loop system. Strateas Carlucci explains that this ensures that every part of the animal has been utilised,\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t \"We are working with a well-established luxury handbag and shoe manufacturer who produces items for many of the larger luxury houses, and also working with suppliers who can ensure we are working with cruelty-free leather products, where the leather is a by-product, not the primary. We know this is not perfect and understand there is much work to be done in this space; however, we do want to be honest and transparent with our customers.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tAnother method to ensure workers and animals are treated humanely is to buy from designers who have transparent supply chains. Many tanneries are rated on their energy and water use, emissions and chemical input. Access to supply chain information also means the treatment of the animal can be traced back to the farm and slaughterhouse. Labels who are conscious of humane sourcing will supply this information on their websites.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t If you choose to buy real leather, it is important to research the brands and materials you're spending your money on, both processes and products. Legacy brand R.M. Williams has been creating leather goods since 1932 and offer full transparency on their website as to where they source their materials. R.M. also build their leather pieces to last and offer a boot repair service and maintenance guide to increase the longevity of their footwear.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIt is essential to look after your wardrobe to ensure you can wear it for years to come. And beyond this, focus on only purchasing pieces which are timeless and which you cherish. That way, you're buying less and are able to spend a little more on each piece to ensure that the animal's life, the craftsmanship of the leatherworker, and the Earth is being respected.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTune in for our learning on Vegan Leather soon.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tSources:\r\n\r\n\r\n\tAlta Andina\r\n\r\n\r\n\tBBC\r\n\r\n\r\n\tGinger and Smart\r\n\r\n\r\n\tFluence Corporation\r\n\r\n\r\n\tGrand View Research\r\n\r\n\r\n\tHarpers Bazaar\r\n\r\n\r\n\tPeta\r\n\r\n\r\n\tR.M. Williams\r\n\r\n\r\n\tThe Guardian\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Dressing in leather is synonymous with subcultures of the rebellious, sexy and tough. But sub no more, leather's gone mainstream. Today, the global leather goods business is worth over $100 billion a year, with roughly half of all leather produced used to make shoes and about 25% for clothing.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/art-of-the-land/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-viscose/\r\n        - /musings/lets-talk-about-linen/\r\n        - /musings/regenerative-fashion-with-kitx/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1221,330,1051,475]","tags":[{"name":"Learnings","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Learnings"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Let's talk about Leather","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/leather-parallax-2-asset-5.jpg?t=1630645170"},"title":"Let's talk about Leather","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/lets-talk-about-leather/"}
Let's talk about Leather

Let's talk about Leather

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"27th Aug 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Ken Leung\r\n\r\n\tIn the lead-up to our WeWearAustralia 2021 campaign launch, Showroom-X Founder Richard Poulson and seasoned creative visionary Ken Leung met to discuss brand purpose and the Japanese concept of ‘ikigai’ or ‘reason for being’. Ken Leung has over 20 years of experience creating the visual language of global brands, including DKNY, 3.1 Phillip Lim, and is responsible for elevating Uniqlo to a global audience in his role as creative director. Ken has an extensive background in inspiring and empowering multi-disciplinary creative teams to produce unique, innovative and engaging brand experiences. Who better to share their knowledge with the Australian Retail Round Table - a meeting of minds that first gathered as an antidote to the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020. This forum provides a virtual meeting place to share stories, advice, support and bolster the retail community. Above all else, it serves as a reminder that we are all in this together and are capable of mutually uplifting all those who are part of the Australian fashion industry. We were so lucky to have Ken Leung join us to discuss ikigai, the intersection where your passions and talent converge with the things that the world needs and is willing to pay for. Ken reminded us all that we each have a purpose, higher than profit and short-term gain. The best won success synchronously uplifts your community, respects the planet, and puts authenticity first.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tYou're a Perth boy. What brings you back?  \r\n\t The nexus of coming back was to renew my U.S. work visa for Uniqlo. And after being here for four months, my family loved it so much, we decided to stay, and I'm not going back. So I’m officially the former Creative Director of Uniqlo.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"I'm taking a look at this      \r\n\tJapanese concept of ikigai\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\"your reason for being\r\n\t\r\n\tand reason to get up\r\n\t\r\n\t every morning.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nYou've worked in creative design for your entire professional career for some of the biggest brands in the world. We're here to talk about ikigai; Your reason for being in the context of branding, and how your reason for being relates to your brand.  \r\n\t It's the whole reason for me moving back to Perth. I had to re-evaluate my career and the lifestyle choices I've been making based around my career. I'm taking a look at this Japanese concept of ikigai: your reason for being and reason to get up every morning. It's what drives you as a person - your purpose. I've been looking at how I want to live my life moving forward. I've lived overseas for almost 20 years, in busy, the very work driven cities of London and New York. I've done work that I'm incredibly proud of. I've had amazing opportunities, but now the opportunity is here for me to shape my life and what I want to prioritise and what kind of work I want to do. That's my ikigai at the moment. And how that relates to brand purpose - It's about taking the time to sit and consider what you stand for as a brand.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tAnd I'm sure there are a lot of people on the other side of the call who are feeling like it's groundhog day and thinking about what they want out of their lives. Did you feel as if your life was out of balance before moving back here? \r\n\t \r\nI definitely did. In 2019, I had a new place in New York, and from August to November, I only slept there for three nights because I was always on the road. That continued during the pandemic. I was on endless zoom calls, especially with Uniqlo. If you could see my alarm list, there were calls every 10 minutes through the night because I was on New York hours. It overtook my life and took its mental toll.  It really made me think about how I want to live my life, where I want to spend most of my time, and how I want to work as efficiently and creatively as possible.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell us a little about your career arc up until now... \r\n\t \r\nMy most recent role was as the global creative director for Uniqlo. I was overseeing all the luxury collaborations, from Jil Sander, JW Anderson, to Marimekko. It was a global role, and I had teams reporting to me from Paris, Shanghai, New York and Portland. Prior to that, I was at DKNY, where my role was to relaunch the brand and bring back its relevance from the 90s when it was in the ultimate urban, cool New York label. I oversaw the creative, advertising, runway shows. We did this runway show on the High Line, where we took over the meatpacking district and created a futuristic vision of New York. Before that, I was at Phillip Lim for six years. That was my first job in fashion. I went to New York, convinced Phillip to move me over from London, and then started the in-house branding team. I had the luxury of working alongside Phillip for six years and helped craft the vision of that brand. I really learned fashion on the job. Before that, I was in the magazine industry.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tBeyond a more balanced lifestyle, what motivates you to stay here in Australia?\r\n\t \r\nMy idea behind ikigai is to use my background, creativity, and connections to elevate my community - Perth, Western Australia, Australia. I can empathise with those of you in fashion retail at the moment. I know it's a tough time. We were in the same position all through 2020 during the pandemic in America. There is a light at the end of the tunnel, and retail did come back stronger. The brands who took time to re-evaluate the messaging and efficiencies of their business seem to be coming out stronger. I want to work with Australian brands and help them scale and represent Australia in the best way possible.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWe're very lucky to have you back on Australian soil! What do you think modern customers are looking for from brands?\r\n\t \r\nGlobally, modern customers are overwhelmed by choice. The things I've seen in the states and certainly here in Australia that have resonated with customers is when they find that emotional connection. That emotional connection is built with brands that stand for something. For example, a brand like Patagonia is very clear about what they stand for, such as their emphasis on sustainability, and they put this cause before profit. When you choose another brand that isn't communicating their brand purpose as well, they can't stand up to Patagonia.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhy is brand purpose important?\r\n\t \r\nFirstly, brand purpose is important for self-motivation, to drive yourself and your team towards a cause larger than profit. And secondly, smart consumers need an emotional connection with your brand beyond the product and a logo. I find that with the brands I work with, we need to define that brand purpose so that it's a clear message to the customer.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat steps can brands take to create authentic messaging around their brand purpose?\r\n\t \r\nDefining an authentic brand purpose beyond making a product starts with leaders asking themselves, \"why do we exist?\" and inspiring alignment from everyone in the team. You need to hire smart people that authentically align with your purpose. Every team member needs to live and breathe your purpose authentically. This will then transfer outwards to the customer. Finally, you also need to think about how you are communicating your purpose to your customer. Keep messaging simple. Maintain confidence in what you stand for. Try not to lose sight of the bigger picture in pursuit of short term profit.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t“Finally, you also need to think about how you are communicating your purpose to your customer. Keep messaging simple. Maintain confidence in what you stand for. Try not to lose sight of the bigger picture in pursuit of short term profit.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWho are some brands doing it right?\r\n\t \r\nWe talked about Patagonia. Other brands who are doing well out of this cause - I would say Stella McCartney. They have very clear messaging. Tesla, for instance, are doing very well. It's clear to the world what this company stands for, love them or hate them. It's almost like the cult of Tesla.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tYou worked with MoMA and The Lourve with Uniqlo. How does the art world differ from fashion?\r\n\t \r\nThe brand purpose of Uniqlo is to make quality clothing democratic. The tagline was 'made for all', which is intended to infiltrate all our communication. Working with MOMA and Louvre was an idea to democratise art. In a sense, it's just a different creative expression but making it more accessible to a public who may see it as intimidating. In terms of how the art world works, they have freedom of expression, but fashion needs more of a purpose. It needs to be driven towards more of a consumer need.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat role do you think brick and mortar stores play today?\r\n\t \r\nI think it's still important. Clothing, there's such a tactility to it. The fabric, details, you can try to capture as much as possible. You talk about the emotional connection to the customer. Of course, you can get that at some level through digital, but that emotional connection comes through human contact. How you're greeted by store staff, how it smells, how they talk to you and explain their knowledge of clothes with the touch of the fabric - you can see the craftsmanship that goes into it better in the store. I think it's a balance. A lot of people say that brick and mortar is on the way out, but I think it's just a matter of finding that balance and what works for whatever you produce.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat does the future of the industry look like to you?\r\n\t \r\nFor me, my hope, I think we produce way too many products right now. I hope we become more efficient and more measured in our quantities and the way that we produce. I know personally, out of the pandemic, I am approaching life with a less is more, and better quality is more mindset. I hope we're not so driven by this relentless pursuit of the new in fashion and that we choose more investment pieces that are timeless. I know that fashion is driven by the seasons, but I do hope that some change can come. The pace is too relentless right now. And I hope we can find a way to slow down and take a more measured approach to fashion.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tAround the east coast of Australia, there are all these snap shutdowns. Was this the case in the US? And what can we learn from that in order to safeguard our retail spaces and our retail sector?\r\n\t \r\nI was in New York, and I was also working with markets around the world. New York was shut down for pretty much March through to July and then started to scale their store hours up slowly. I understand that on the East Coast, it's challenging to plan. We didn't have that experience in New York. It was a flat shutdown, and once stores were given the green light to reopen, they were able to remain open. Once they opened again, retail sales went through the roof for those who were able to weather the storm. Because consumers weren't able to spend their money, they went out in droves. We saw that in Asia too. In China, when the Hermes store reopened, it did a record first day, a couple of million. And the same went for Uniqlo there. Hopefully, it's the same in Australia, and the customers will all come back once it reopens. But with everything changing so rapidly, I understand how hard it is.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWas there anything you learned during the pandemic that Australian brands may be able to use to help support their businesses during lockdowns?\r\n\t \r\nI would imagine people at home are more engaged with social media. I know I personally was engaging with brands and learning a lot of things about the industry when I wasn't able to go into the office. There is an opportunity to engage with more customers through thoughtful content and telling them different parts of your brand story. And it doesn't need to be a huge investment in creating content. You can do it very nimbly. I learned during the lockdown that a lot of the things that we were doing before, we can do a lot more efficiently, cost and speed wise. You don't need that full production we thought we did. We ironed out a lot of inefficiencies.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDuring your experiences working across the world, did you see the industry coming together to collaborate and support each other during the pandemic?\r\n\t \r\nIn New York, we didn't get government assistance. The US government do things their own way. Due to that lack of support, everyone had to band together. That kind of group, shared community mentality was something positive that came out of it. It was across all industries, in fashion and definitely in hospitality and restaurants, people were pulling together to keep each other motivated and support each other emotionally and with exposure to help with sales.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nHow can brands better engage their audience?\r\n\t \r\nIn the US, I'm seeing many brands engaging their customers and asking for their feedback on product. That consumer engagement, where the consumer feels like they are part of and have a voice in the brand, is incalculable. There is a brand in the US called glossier, owned by Emily Whyte, and she has been really good at speaking directly to the customer via socials to talk about what products people are missing. It really engages the consumer and makes them feel like they are part of the brand, and the brand becomes a living thing with back and forth communication.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nHow can we uplift the Australian fashion industry at this time?\r\n\t \r\nWell, here we are now, people from all parts of our industry, coming together. We have, right now, a community of people sharing each other's content and making sure people are aware of each other's brands.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nHow can we uplift the Australian fashion industry at this time?\r\n\t \r\nWell, here we are now, people from all parts of our industry, coming together. We have, right now, a community of people sharing each other's content and making sure people are aware of each other's brands.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWave Photo by @ryanmurphystudio\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        In the lead-up to our #WeWearAustralia 2021 campaign launch, Showroom-X Founder Richard Poulson and seasoned creative visionary Ken Leung met to discuss brand purpose and the Japanese concept of ‘ikigai’ or ‘reason for being’. Ken Leung has over 20 years of experience creating the visual language of global brands, including DKNY, 3.1 Phillip Lim, and is responsible for elevating Uniqlo to a global audience in his role as creative director.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Conversation with Ken Leung - Minutes of Meeting","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/ken-and-rich.jpeg?t=1629962662"},"title":"Conversation with Ken Leung - Minutes of Meeting","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/conversation-with-ken-leung-minutes-of-meeting/"}
Conversation with Ken Leung - Minutes of Meeting

Conversation with Ken Leung - Minutes of Meeting

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"27th Aug 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Young Blood\r\n\r\n\tFor the newest injection into our Art Annex, we have gathered four of Australia’s up and coming artists to discuss their works, daily pleasures and the places they’re finding inspiration. While talking with these young Australians, each spoke to an undercurrent of intensified creative energy and collaboration in our country. One of the by-products of this challenging period in history has been a collective craving for art and beauty in the home, and these artists are answering the call. \r\n\tSaxon Quinn, Giorgia Bel, Milly Dent, and Giorgia McRae all spoke of increased time spent idly, with room to explore ideas and expand their perspectives. It was Einstein who said, “The monotony and solitude of a quiet life stimulates the creative mind.” The current landscape of our country has our artists from Saint Cloche finding beauty in the everyday; long walks, plants poking between concrete, bubblegum littered footpaths, and resoundingly, music.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            Each artist embraces the      \r\n\ttactile nature of their practice\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\tFinding beauty\r\n\t\r\n\tin the\r\n\t\r\n\t everyday\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nWhat do you need around you to feel creatively motivated? \r\nSaxon Quinn: Music. I’ve been getting into some older stuff lately. I find music a great way to get the balance of works created, working with negative space and the positioning of details.\r\n\r\nGiorgia Bel: I can’t think of a time when I haven’t had music on. Softly or loudly, it’s there. \r\n\r\nMilly Dent:\r\nA clean space, the right tools, some music and a clear mind.\r\n\r\nGiorgia McRae:\r\nI need my studio to be clear… or at least not chaotic.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tSAXON QUINN \r\n\t Saxon is an emerging artist from Melbourne. Each one of Saxon’s works created for Showroom-X tie into his signature aesthetics - the use of cement, strays and texture. These elements tie together with the calming use of balance and placement. The ‘Fall Apart Together’ series explores the idea of finding strength in each other's weaknesses. Saxon’s work takes a cue from the asphalt sprawl streetscapes of our cities.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you best describe your art practice?\r\n\t \r\nAbstract, brutalist, wabi-sabi. Much of my art is focused around being within the urban landscape – in particular, the cement material of our concrete jungles. Works represent the scarred, coarse-aggregate pavements, and walls found throughout cities and towns;  from children scribbling in chalk on suburban bitumen streets to tagged walls and bubblegum littered footpaths downtown.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you to this practice? Did you always want to be an artist?\r\n\t \r\nMy mother is an artist and works with texture in a lot of her work. I grew up surrounded by art and always knew that I would end up creating works in some medium.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it? \r\n\t \r\nI love the fact that it allows me to escape and reset. I’m generally quite anxious and always on the go, but when I paint, I am able to relax and focus on painting alone.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape? Do you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity?\r\n\t \r\nI like the fact that creatives from all walks of life can get together and collaborate on projects. I’ve found that local artists have been very approachable when it comes to sharing knowledge and experiences.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWho are your idols?\r\n\t \r\nMum. She has a neverending positive attitude and is always sharing down knowledge. She’s the life of the party. People blossom around her.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\tGIORGIA BEL\r\n\t \r\nGiorgia Bel is a self-taught artist who predominantly works with acrylic and oil-based paint. She began playing with paint and sketch five years ago, aspiring to simply create beauty from a darker place of ill health & recovery. Giorgia uses colour and texture to create depth in her works which focus on imagined and seen landscapes, undersea-scapes and the human form.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you best describe your art practice?\r\n\t \r\nMy art practice is my medicine, my meditation. I go, I wander in my mind, and I begin. The practice is not careful, my hand is free, and I sketch rough lines and start to fill in; colours over colours, layering, in textured strokes. It’s not a formal practice that I have learnt. It’s just exactly what I feel.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you to this practice? Did you always want to be an artist?\r\n\t \r\nI wanted to be a designer or an architect. I studied this but fell ill in my early twenties, putting a halt to my first years of working. My doctor told me to paint to help still my mind. I couldn’t do much at the time, so I took the advice and picked up a brush. I didn’t like it much at first, but I found rest in it. Ultimately it helped me heal. It is a great love of my life.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?\r\n\t \r\nI am lucky enough to be in a studio that is surrounded by plants. I walk through the alley often when taking a break to stretch. This is really stimulating.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat or who is currently inspiring your world?\r\n\t \r\nI’m taking long walks being in lockdown. Using my camera to capture specks of colour I see in the path or a flower that stands out. The rocks and crashing water at the beach. There is so much to stimulate your mind as you step out of the house.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\tMILLY DENT\r\n\t \r\nMilly Dent is a Sydney based ceramic artist. Milly reimagines everyday routines through uniquely handcrafted, exclusive ceramic works, underlied with the philosophy of creating pieces that are both utilitarian and sculptural. In her body of work for Showroom X, Milly uses white porcelain stained with black pigments to create a statement series of wares which fire to a beautiful black graphite colour, a wonderful contrast to any white space in which they sit.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you best describe your art practice?\r\n\t \r\nMy evolving collections are a continued study of the intimate, tangible and ever-challenging nature of porcelain. Learning from its history as well as new processes to create innovative, interesting work.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it? \r\n\t \r\nThere is something so rewarding about crafting an object from essentially nothing with your hands. Porcelain has many wonderful qualities that draw me in, including the whiteness, the translucency and the vitrified-stoney feel once fired, as well as the soft, malleable, gentle feel of the unfired material.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nAre there any Australian designers you love?\r\n\t \r\nYes! Lots! Clever friends such as Evi O, Pip Stent, Tara Burke and Claire Johnson.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWho are your idols?\r\n\t \r\nMy creative friends!\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat or who is currently inspiring your world?\r\n\t \r\nThe ocean. It’s refreshing, humbling and best of all, inspiring.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\tGIORGIA MCRAE\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\tGiorgia McRae is a multi-disciplinary artist based in Sydney. The series of drawings she has created for Showroom-X is an ode to balance and weight, and how we need both to keep grounded in our daily lives. She explores both sculpture and drawing and has created a playful relationship between the two mediums. There is a nod to yin and yang in her work, and the beauty in simplicity, which is ever present in these pastels.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nHow would you best describe your art practice?\r\n\t \r\nI like to think that my work is part abstract, modernist, and cubist plus a little Art Deco and a little Bauhaus – I’m maybe a little greedy with that mouthful. My process is intuitive, so each line, shape, and colour will influence the next. I don’t think I’ve ever known how one of my pieces was going to turn out - which is sometimes a blessing and sometimes a curse depending on the end result.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat drew you to this practice? Did you always want to be an artist?\r\n\t \r\nStrangely enough, I always thought that I’d be a ceramicist – But almost straight away, drawing took on a life of its own. The ‘drawn’ sculptures were impossible, without bases, just floating in space.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat do you enjoy about it? \r\n\t \r\nSo many things! But if I had to pick one, it would have to be creating a composition that works. It’s always such a wonderful moment when you feel your mind go ‘yup, that’s enough, that’s finished.’ Or even the feeling of being on the clear road to that feeling.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape? Do you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity?\r\n\t \r\nIt feels like there’s a nice little hum of excitement and creativity in the air – maybe because we’ve been in and out of lockdowns and people are spending money on things that will make their houses feel beautiful instead of on travel? If I’m completely honest, I’ve also quite enjoyed being able to lock myself away in my studio during the latest lockdown. It will be so nice to see what we’ve all been working on when this is all over.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nWhat or who is currently inspiring your world?\r\n\t \r\nOh gosh, so many artists. Le Corbusier, Joan Miro, Helen Frankenthaler, Alexander Calder, Mark Rothko, Jean-Michel Basquiat – the list could go on forever.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        For the newest injection into our Art Annex, we have gathered four of Australia’s up and coming artists to discuss their works, daily pleasures and the places they’re finding inspiration. While talking with these young Australians, each spoke to an undercurrent of intensified creative energy and collaboration in our country.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1701, 1702, 1703, 1700,1705,1706,1707]","tags":[{"name":"portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Artist In Residence - The Collective","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/artist-in-residence-collective-banner.jpg?t=1630044451"},"title":"Artist In Residence - The Collective","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/artist-in-residence-the-collective/"}
Artist In Residence - The Collective

Artist In Residence - The Collective

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"20th Aug 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"Poppy Lissiman\r\n\r\n\tHandmade, eye-catching, and always a little left of centre, Poppy Lissiman is for the spirited and self-assured. Poppy makes eyewear in an eclectic range of colours and shapes that bring to life the face of every muse who wears them. It is scientifically proven that different colours impact the beholder's mood, feelings, and even behaviour. Yet, the psychology of colour is something we rarely consider when it comes to compiling our closets. Colour plays a huge role in Poppy's designs and personal aesthetic, and a shade or hue will often be the starting point in her designs. This passion culminates into a technicolour dreamscape, with Poppy's love of bright shades, natural wine and 80s Japanese pop music steeped into her unique designs. Talking to Poppy is a welcome reminder that our modern 'uniforms' of black and beige come to life with some pops of colour, and our appetite for a wardrobe that is truly uplifting has never been bigger. Accessories with a flourish feel like a perfect place to start.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tTell me a little about your upbringing. What is your family like?  \r\n\t I’m really close with my family. Both my parents are directors of my label and have big roles in the day to day running of the business. I also have a younger brother who’s a graphic designer and has also done quite a bit of work at Poppy Lissiman when it comes to designing prints and updating lookbooks!\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"I often start with an idea of the \r\n\tcolour      \r\n\tof something I want to design first and think about how it looks afterwards.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"Colour plays a huge role \r\n\t\r\n\t in my designs,\r\n\tinspiration \r\n\t and \r\n\tpersonal aesthetic.\"\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nHow would you best describe what you do professionally?  \r\n\t I’m a designer and run my e-commerce store.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat drew you to fashion design? \r\n\t \r\nI’ve always been very into fashion and making my own outfits and clothes. My mum taught me to sew from a young age. When I left school, I started working in fashion retail and immediately felt like I had found my calling. I initially didn’t think I could make a career out of it, but the more I worked with other people who were just as obsessed with fashion as me. I realised there wasn’t any other industry I could imagine myself in.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me a little about Poppy Lissiman. What motivated you to start the label?\r\n\t \r\nWhen I started my label, the intention was to create a stepping stone to have my own brick and mortar store one day. I saw having a label as being the first step to getting my name out there. It was initially dressy, occasion wear for women, way back in 2008. I was 19! I’m not the same person I was then, and the label is completely different to how it started. I think that’s a testament to still being in business today, adapting to survive.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat do you enjoy about it? \r\n\t \r\nI get to be creative almost every day and have the freedom of working for myself with people I love. I love the business side of having a brand as well, problem-solving and strategic planning. I’ve also had the pleasure of collaborating with some of my favourite artists, which has been such a treat.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live?\r\n\t \r\nCurrently, I am living in a house my husband and I bought in Fremantle, which we have almost finished renovating. My office is nearby, and I am there most days.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat does a typical day look like for you?\r\n\t \r\nI try to start most days with a bit of exercise, usually pilates or weight training. Then I have a cup of tea and listen to my favourite news podcasts (The Economist, The Guardian’s Full Story & The New York Times’ The Daily) while I get ready for work. Then I head into my office, where I usually spend the first half of the day replying to emails. It’s always the goal to quash the most pressing ones before lunch, so I can have lunch and return to the office to spend the remainder of the afternoon being creative. I usually leave the office at five to come home and spend some time with my husband and dog Skuttle. We usually like to go for a bit of a walk then make dinner together. After dinner, I will sometimes spend another hour or so replying to emails followed by doom scrolling in bed.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires you professionally?\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t“I love learning new skills or working with new mediums. I’ve really enjoyed working across new categories as my design career has progressed. For example, making sunglasses was such a learning curve compared to making dresses. At the moment, I am working on a homewares line which has been super inspiring and enjoyable.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style?\r\n\t \r\nComfortable and colourful.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat role does colour play in your designs? And in your personal aesthetic?\r\n\t \r\nColour plays a huge role in my designs, inspiration and personal aesthetic. I often start with an idea of the colour of something I want to design first and think about how it looks afterwards. I go through massive stages with colours where I become obsessed with a certain hue.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you ‘can’t do without’?\r\n\t \r\nSocks. My feet are always cold.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat or who is inspiring your world at this moment?\r\n\t \r\nProbably interiors at the moment. I’ve been quite obsessed with architecture and interiors for a while, but in recent years and definitely more since the pandemic and being shuttered in, I found my obsession escalated.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDescribe your workspace – where is it located, and what do you need around you to feel creatively motivated?\r\n\t \r\nI’ve been working in Sydney for the last four years, so I’ve just refreshed my office here now that I am back in WA. I’ve got a lovely forward-facing bookshelf with some of my favourite design books and a desk I designed and had made out of walnut burl, and an offcut of a slab of dark green marble. To be motivated, I usually need my space around me to be relatively tidy. Otherwise, I will procrastinate until it’s all in order again. I often struggle to design at home because there are too many chores I get distracted by! I’m lucky that I can work almost anywhere so long as I have my laptop and a notebook to sketch. However, when I’m really deep in the design development stage, I do need a bit more space for all my materials swatch cards. They can be a bit chaotic when they are all spread out.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Handmade, eye-catching, and always a little left of centre, Poppy Lissiman is for the spirited and self-assured. Poppy makes eyewear in an eclectic range of colours and shapes that bring to life the face of every muse who wears them. It is scientifically proven that different colours impact the beholder's mood, feelings, and even behaviour. Yet, the psychology of colour is something we rarely consider when it comes to compiling our closets. Colour plays a huge role in Poppy's designs and personal aesthetic, and a shade or hue will often be the starting point in her designs. This passion culminates into a technicolour dreamscape, with Poppy's love of bright shades, natural wine and 80s Japanese pop music steeped into her unique designs. Talking to Poppy is a welcome reminder that our modern 'uniforms' of black and beige come to life with some pops of colour, and our appetite for a wardrobe that is truly uplifting has never been bigger. Accessories with a flourish feel like a perfect place to start. \r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1683, 1602, 1601, 1600]\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\t<","tags":[{"name":"Moodboards","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Moodboards"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Poppy Lissiman talks Colour","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/poppy.jpeg?t=1629435467"},"title":"Poppy Lissiman talks Colour","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/poppy-lissiman-talks-colour/"}
Poppy Lissiman talks Colour

Poppy Lissiman talks Colour

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{"author":"Sally Paton","date_published":"12th Aug 2021","show_read_more":false,"summary":"STRATEAS CARLUCCI\r\n\r\n\tHailing from Melbourne, Australia, STRATEAS CARLUCCI is a creative collaboration between Peter Strateas and Mario-Luca Carlucci. Founded in 2013, the label quickly garnered impressive accolades for its expertly constructed designs where structure, texture and fabric are of the utmost importance. While Peter and Mario-Luca remain highly focused on the principles of design, they know that fashion has a cultural significance that extends beyond aesthetics. Their vision expanded into creating designs for men and women that are both timeless and subversive. Each garment has hand-crafted elements, contributing to the structured, minimalist aesthetic of the designs, which unite with subtle references to underground subcultures and art movements.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nMeeting with Peter and Mario-Luca to discuss their designs feels more akin to speaking with conceptual artists. The label is fascinated by duality and the merging of binary opposites, particularly art and design and masculinity and femininity, creating collections led by a concept. Working in a small team, they are able to remain highly reactive to conversations and questions surrounding the industry and have attracted an audience who “won’t compromise quality over cost, who are curious about the processes involved, and the creative, conceptual storytelling behind each garment.” Through their thoughtful design and art series, they can live with the questions, actively seeking solutions and new modes of operating in the world to activate the minds and spirits of their audience and beyond.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nThe STRATEAS CARLUCCI studio is always buzzing and busy. Mario-Luca has two children, River, aged 4, and Ryder, aged 10, who spends days after school involved in little projects (we have heard rumblings of a new kids line!). They also have their studio pup, Raf, roaming the floor, creating a familial, happy mix alongside their small and close-knit team. STRATEAS CARLUCCI is more of a lifestyle of Mario-Luca and Peter, so it always includes their private worlds, with the personal and the professional feeding into each other. We are lucky to have shared a conversation with the two designers to discuss their practice of finding new mediums, perspectives and solutions to employ and express through the creation of their bold yet enduring designs.\r\n\r\n\r\n\tHow would you best describe what you do professionally?  \r\n\t We’d best describe ourselves as creatives. Although the main medium we work with is fashion, and the tangible element of that is garments, it’s much more than that for us. Like any art form, there is a deep conceptual component to our work, which lives beyond the physical garments. The research and storytelling combined with the cross-design disciplines, including art and design, are found in many shapes and forms.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n            \"If a garment hasn't been thoughtfully designed,     \r\n\tethically produced  and consciously sourced...\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\"It is most likely \r\n\t\r\n\tnot going to \r\n\tstand the test\r\n\t\r\n\tof time.\"\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nWhat drew you to fashion design? What do you enjoy about it?  \r\n\t We found that fashion allows us the freedom to explore both the conceptual and the commercial. It allows us to investigate many different ideas and concepts, as each season almost acts as a new project, where we can build on past concepts or explore new ideas. Fashion is a fast-paced industry, and we like challenging ourselves each season and developing new ways of working, including new techniques and technologies. It’s not stagnant, making it exciting and challenging, always allowing room for growth and development.\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat inspires you professionally?\r\n\t \r\nProfessionally, you face many challenges in this industry, so what inspires us is the pursuit of bettering ourselves and our brand. This includes being agile, adapting to the ever-changing industry, and learning to grow and accept change.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me about your day-to-day. Where do you live? What does a typical day look like for you?\r\n\t \r\nWe live and work in Melbourne, which is a very inspiring city to be as a creative. You are surrounded by other like-minded creatives, and there is a thriving cultural and arts scene. Our studio is based in Brunswick East, and our building was once a hosiery manufacturer, so there’s a link and history to the fashion and textile industry. Our team is small, and we spend most of our days multitasking and working on multiple projects, from new collection development to production, shoot planning, concept building and research. It’s a great environment to work in. We are fortunate enough to have lots of space with beautiful natural light. We manufacture all our collections in Melbourne and develop everything in-house.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is exciting for you about the current Australian creative landscape?\r\n\t \r\nAustralia has really become a major international contender when it comes to all things creative. From fashion, art, music, food and wine, design in general – Australia is certainly pushing boundaries and taking charge. We love being included in that and sharing our story. There are so many talented creatives in Australia. Personally, it seemed for a while that perhaps Australia was shadowed by other major markets like Europe and the USA, however over the past decade, it seems we are now breaking through and making our mark.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tDo you think there’s a common thread in Australian design and creativity? Something within the realm of design or dressing that feels innately Australian?\r\n\t \r\nWe believe that the ‘Australian attitude’ is the common thread. In Australia, the overall attitude feels more wholesome and relaxed. There is a value placed on having a work/life balance, and we pride ourselves on being caring, mindful and collaborative. No matter what aesthetic your brand or what style or categories you make, our collective attitude remains the same and reflects in all our work.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tHow would you describe your personal style?\r\n\t \r\nWe dress minimal, comfortable and almost always in black. We love textiles and surface design, so although garments may be black, they will always be textured. We enjoy mixing and matching styles, from a simple tailored pant, a pair of sneakers, or a quality tailored jacket, worn over a cotton baggy pleat pant. Our aim is to make garments that suit the modern wardrobe, have a classic sensibility and last the test of time. With that in mind, we love mixing past collection favourites with some new additions.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tIs there a piece from your wardrobe that you ‘can’t do without’?\r\n\t \r\nFor Peter, it would be his classic tailored Proto Blazer. He wears a version of this almost on the daily. For Mario-Luca, it’s the baggy pleated pant. Again, he owns multiple versions and wears them religiously.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat does luxury mean to you? \r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t“Luxury is time. Spend it wisely and concisely. Don’t waste it. The same mantra is applied to fashion.” \r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\t\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tTell me a little about Strateas Carlucci. What motivated you to start the label?\r\n\t \r\nSTRATEAS CARLUCCI was born organically and has grown organically over the years. We simply wanted to make beautiful collections, collaborate with amazing creatives and explore and push personal and creative boundaries.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWho do you design for? \r\n\t \r\nWe design for a customer who appreciates locally, ethically and consciously made products of quality. Those who won’t compromise quality over cost, who are curious about the processes involved, and the creative, conceptual storytelling behind each garment. They care for the planet and the people who occupy it and love great fashion.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat is your approach to design? How do you make a garment or accessory timeless? And lasting?\r\n\t \r\nWe tend to steer clear of trends and design our collections based off fundamental wardrobe essentials. Although we make new collections each season, you will find it’s like a continuation from one to the next. Good design, to us, will last the test of time, both physically in its quality and construction, and in its appearance. Fit and form are essential to this process, so we put in a lot of work to ensure garments fit how they are supposed to and are constructed in the best way, without compromise.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tAre the majority of your pieces designed to be unisex? \r\n\t \r\nWhen we design a collection, we begin with a concept. The collections are not driven by gender and categories; therefore, we think of this from a holistic approach. We have always championed the idea of genderless clothing, as it’s made for everyone. You will find most of our items are shot and styled on all genders, male, female and non-binary.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tYou produce everything ethically and locally in Melbourne. \r\n\t \r\nSince the brand’s inception, we have made 100% of our collections in Melbourne, working with local and accredited manufacturers. We love the idea of supporting and working with our local community. We are fortunate enough to still have some amazing and talented manufacturers in Melbourne, ranging in all kinds of specialised areas, from tailoring to knitwear, jerseys and more. We have built great relationships with our collaborators over the years, and they have become an extension of our team.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\n\tWhat are some changes you’ve noted in the fashion industry in recent times?  \r\n\t \r\nCustomers are much savvier and more researched nowadays, which has put a lot of much-welcomed pressure on the fashion industry. There are ongoing conversations around sustainability, ethical production, diversity in the industry, image diversity, gender equality and general transparency on how brands operate. Fashion brands are now being held accountable and scrutinised, which has opened up the conversation around these topics and makes it harder for larger corporations to hide. We are supportive of all these changes, and we know that we, too, have a long way to go. Being a small team, we are able to listen to these conversations and comments, some of which are directed to us from our customers, others that are general topics, and can take action and make changes where needed.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nYou’re also exploring the re-use and repurposing of deadstock and fashion waste in a series of non-fashion experiments called “Art-Series”. What ideas or issues does this series aim to explore?\r\n\t \r\nFashion for us is more than just a garment or finished product. It’s the concept and idea behind it. We explore other design disciplines to help us visually articulate these concepts, and over the years, have created a body of work called ‘Art-Series’. We aim to use deadstock fabric remnants in the majority of our collections, and we also have a zero-waste policy in our studio. If we can’t re-use the garments or fabrics in the collection for whatever reason (sometimes damaged, or off-cuts which would be considered waste), we include these in our Art-Series to help highlight a particular issue or message. We’ve explored concepts around sustainability in what we call ‘Co-Exist’.\r\n\r\n\r\n\t\r\nOh yes. I did read on your site - you describe it as a place “Where nature and civilisation live in harmony”. What are some pieces you’ve created under that banner? \r\n\t \r\nIn one instance, we buried biodegradable wool products and watched these decompose over time via a timelapse. In another instance, we did a shoot with native Australian flora intertwined with some vegan leather garments, highlighting the idea of fashion and nature living in harmony. In a series we called ‘Fab-briquette’, we made fabric sculptures constructed from waste. This is something we are hoping to continue to grow and evolve.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n# x-field x-format:yaml\r\nbodyTitle: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet\r\nteaserText: |\r\n        Hailing from Melbourne, Australia, STRATEAS CARLUCCI is a creative collaboration between Peter Strateas and Mario-Luca Carlucci. Founded in 2013, the label quickly garnered impressive accolades for its expertly constructed designs where structure, texture and fabric are of the utmost importance. While Peter and Mario-Luca remain highly focused on the principles of design, they know that fashion has a cultural significance that extends beyond aesthetics. Their vision expanded into creating designs for men and women that are both timeless and subversive. Each garment has hand-crafted elements, contributing to the structured, minimalist aesthetic of the designs, which unite with subtle references to underground subcultures and art movements.\r\npublication:\r\n    name: Sally Paton\r\n    image: https://store-s1mbbc7h64.mybigcommerce.com/product_images/import/Sally-headshot.JPG\r\n    note: |\r\nrelated:\r\n    title: More From The Journal\r\n    items: \r\n        - /musings/bianca-spender-/\r\n        - /musings/muse-charlee-fraser/\r\n        - /musings/brodie-neill-/\r\n        - /musings/introducing-tatsiana-shevarenkova/\r\nrelatedProduct:\r\n    title: Related Products\r\n    items: [1614, 1615, 1616, 1617, 1638, 1639]","tags":[{"name":"Portfolios","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/tag/Portfolios"}],"thumbnail":{"alt":"Strateas Carlucci","data":"https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-s1mbbc7h64/images/stencil/{:size}/uploaded_images/screen-shot-2021-08-12-at-10.17.12-am.png?t=1628739106"},"title":"Strateas Carlucci","url":"https://showroom-x.com/musings/strateas-carlucci/"}
Strateas Carlucci

Strateas Carlucci

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